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Glow, Lewis L.

Lewis L. Glow Photograph Album

1936-1939
1 photograph album 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 050 G53
Image of Lewis L. Glow, May 1939
Lewis L. Glow, May 1939

Born in East Pepperell, Mass., on May 1, 1916, the son of Edward and Angela Glow, Lewis Lyman Glow studied chemistry at Massachusetts State College during the latter years of the Great Depression. Graduating with the class of 1939, Glow continued his studies at Norwich University before serving aboard the USS New Jersey during the Second World War and Korean conflict. Glow died in East Pepperell on Sept. 23, 1986.

A well-labeled, thorough, and thoroughly personal photograph album, this documents the four years spent at Mass. State College. In addition to numerous images of Glow’s classmates and friends, his rooms at the Colonial Inn, beer parties and student highjinks such as the annual rope pull and horticultural show, the album includes numerous images of the cattle barn fire of September 1937 and the extensive damage to the MSC campus and surrounding town from the Hurricane of 1938.

Subjects

  • Fires--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Massachusetts State College--Students
  • New England Hurricane, 1938

Contributors

  • Glow, Lewis L.

Types of material

  • Photographs
Stockwell, E. Sidney

E. Sidney Stockwell Papers

1910-1928
7 boxes 3.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 691
Image of Sid Stockwell
Sid Stockwell

A member of the Massachusetts Agricultural College class of 1919, Ervin Sidney Stockwell, Jr. (1898-1983) was born in Winthrop, Mass., to Grace Cobb and E. Sidney Cobb, Sr., a successful business man and owner of a wholesale dairy. Entering MAC as a freshman in 1915, Stockwell, Jr., studied agricultural economics and during his time in Amherst, took part in the college debate team, winning his class award for oratory, and dramatics with the Roister Doisters. He performed military service in 1918 at Plattsburgh, N.Y., and Camp Lee, Va. Stockwell went on to found a successful custom-house brokerage in Boston, E. Sidney Import Export, and was followed at his alma mater by his son and great-grandson.

The extensive correspondence between Sidney Stockwell and his mother, going in both directions, provides a remarkably in-depth perspective on a typical undergraduate’s life at Massachusetts Agricultural College during the time of the First World War, a period when MAC was considered an innovator in popular education. The letters touch on the typical issues of academic life and social activity, Stockwell’s hopes for the future, his military service and the war. Following graduation, Stockwell undertook an adventurous two year trip in which he worked his way westward across the country, traveling by rail and foot through the Dakotas, Wyoming and Montana, Washington state and California, taking odd jobs to earn his keep and writing home regularly to describe his journey. An oral history with Stockwell is available in the University Archives as part of the Class of 1919 project.

Subjects

  • Agricultural education--Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students
  • Montana--Description and travel
  • North Dakota--Description and travel
  • Washington--Description and travel
  • World War, 1914-1918

Contributors

  • Stockwell, E. Sidney
  • Stockwell, Helen Cobb
University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Massachusetts Amherst Sound Recordings Collection

1928-2015
26 28.5 linear feet
Call no.: RG 185

Established in 1863 as the Massachusetts Agricultural College, the University of Massachusetts Amherst is a national research university and the flagship campus of the states five-campus University system. UMass, one of the founding members of the Five College Consortium established in 1965, offers reciprocal student access among the University and Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges. The University currently enrolls approximately 24,000 undergraduate and graduate students, and offers 87 bachelor’s degree programs, 6 associate’s, 73 masters, and 51 doctoral programs in 10 schools and colleges.

Collocated for reasons of preservation and convenience of storage, the sound recordings in this series were produced under a variety of circumstances by a range of individuals and units in the university. Although they represent only a small proportion of the audio materials in UMass collections, they include a handful of recordings of administration activities, such as the Board of Trustees meetings and the Chancellor’s Committee investigating the women’s occupation of the Daily Collegian offices, along with selected recordings from the Distinguished Visitors Program.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst

Contributors

  • Distinguished Visitors Program (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Types of material

  • Audiocassettes
  • Audiotapes
  • Open reel audiotapes
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Alumni

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Alumni

1871-2007
146.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 050

This record group contains materials that document alumni and alumni activities throughout the history of the Amherst campus. Included are annual reports, constitutions and by-laws, board and committee minutes, cash books and financial statements, correspondence, alumni directories, class lists, obituaries, biographies, bibliographies of alumni writings, photographs, alumni periodicals, brochures from alumni events, newsclippings, handbooks and manuals, reunion and dinner programs, scrapbooks, memorabilia and artifacts.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Alumni

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Alumni Office

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Scrapobooks
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Library

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Library

1876-2007
75 linear feet
Call no.: RG 008

Beginning in a room in the first South College building, filled with books donated by faculty, staff, and students, the University Library has grown to include over three million items. After expanding into larger quarters in the Old Chapel Building in 1884 (the first campus building designed as a library), the library was relocated to Goodell Hall (1935) and the University Library tower (1973), named the W.E.B. Du Bois Library in 1996. Other library facilities on campus have included libraries for the biological sciences, physical sciences, and the Music Library, as well as the Integrated Science and Engineering Library in the Lederle Graduate Research Center.

The collection consists of basic administrative records of many library departments, the records of the Library Director (1924-1975), other materials that document the library, its staff and activities, and information about the design, construction, and dedication of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library tower, the Hampshire Inter-Library Center (HILC), and Five College cooperation.

Subjects

  • Academic libraries--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Library
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Public Affairs

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Public Affairs

1866-2007
73.75 linear feet
Call no.: RG 005

Public relations efforts at UMass have shifted over the years from an early emphasis on education in agriculture and home economics to contemporary efforts to manage the torrent of information generated by a research university. The first news editor at UMass was not appointed until 1948, and as late as 1961, the entire central Public Relations staff consisted only of a news and publications editor, although the College of Agriculture hosted a separate staff of five. Since the 1960s, however, the public relations efforts have expanded as rapidly as the University as a whole. The position of Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development was created in 1983, (called Vice Chancellor for University Advancement after 1993) to oversee public affairs, alumni relations, and development activities.

This record group consists of materials from the several offices concerned with the production of University publications and publicity. The records include press releases, brochures, guidebooks, newsclippings, newsletters, bulletins, weekly newspapers, semi-monthly feature publications, special publications and photographic negatives. Also included in this group are the following publications: Chancellor’s Monthly Press Briefings, Chancellor’s Annual Review of NewsClips, Commonwealth Research Reports, Campus Guidebooks, University Newsletter, Weekly Bulletin, Executive Bulletin, University Bulletin, brochures, Contact, UMass, Science Journal, University Notebook, Tips, News Summary, and the Commonwealth Journal.

Subjects

  • Public relations--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Office of Public Affairs
University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Education

University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Education

1967-2007
46.5 linear feet
Call no.: RG 013

In 1906, the Massachusetts Legislature enacted a law supporting the development of agricultural teaching in elementary schools in the Commonwealth, and in the following year, President Kenyon L. Butterfield, a leader in the rural life movement, organized a separate Department of Agricultural Education at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, introducing training courses for the preparation of teachers of agriculture. The Board of Trustees changed the name of the Department of Agricultural Education to the Department of Education in 1932, which became the School of Education in 1955.

The records of the School of Education group chart the evolution of teacher training at UMass from its agricultural origins to the current broad-based curriculum. Of particular note in the record group are materials the early collection of Teacher Training: Vocational Agriculture materials (1912-1964) and the National School Alternative Programs films and related materials.

Access restrictions: The National School Alternative Program films and related materials are housed off-site and require 24-hour retrieval notification.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Education
University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Physical Education

University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Physical Education

1868-2000
18 linear feet
Call no.: RG 018

Physical education was required of all students during the early years of Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC), enforced through required courses in the Department of Military Science and Tactics. Although intermural competition began shortly thereafter with a loss by the Wilder Baseball Association (Mass Aggies) to Amherst College 57-38, athletics were slow to catch on, due largely to a lack of student interest and faculty opposition. By 1909, a formal department of Physical Education and Hygiene was established to provide fitness training and coordinate the sports teams, with a separate women’s program following in 1940, however unlike most other universities, athletics were de-emphasized at UMass for many years, remaining more or less stagnant until the post-1960 expansion of the University.

This record group consists of annual reports, Athletic Board records, committee meeting minutes, policies, financial statements (1911-1921), histories, handbooks, Varsity “M” Club records, Hall of Fame records, athletic field records, correspondence and memoranda, curriculum and teacher training courses, colloquia and conference materials, schedules and scores (1871-1923), newsletters and newsclippings, media programs and guides, brochures and catalogs, pamphlets and fliers, and related materials.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Sports

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Athletic Board
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Physical Education
University of Massachusetts Amherst. University as a Whole

University of Massachusetts Amherst. University as a Whole

1849-2007
82.75 linear feet
Call no.: RG 001

Established under the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1863, the Massachusetts Agricultural College began with four faculty members and 56 students distributed among four wooden buildings and acres of farms, orchards, and fields. In keeping with the progressive educational principles of its early years, the College offered advanced instruction in the eminently practical pursuit of agriculture, while its fellow land grant college, MIT, covered the mechanical arts. Although “Mass Aggie’s” fortunes waxed and waned, it grew to become Massachusetts State College in 1931, and the University of Massachusetts in 1947.

Among the official publications of the University in Record Group 1 are institutional histories, annual reports, special reports, minutes, directories, catalogs, newsclippings, press releases, and memorabilia.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Theses and Dissertations

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Theses and Dissertations

1894-2011

Most masters theses and dissertations written by UMass Amherst students are available in electronic form through the university’s institutional repository, ScholarWorks. The Record Group also includes a nearly complete run of undergraduate honors theses, arranged chronologically by year and then alphabetically by author. Honors theses titles can be viewed on site at Special Collections and University Archives, and may take up to one business day to retrieve. The most recent undergraduate honors theses are held by the Commonwealth Honors College and can be requested directly through the CHC.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst