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Burnett, Bela, 1778-

Bela Burnett Account Book
1801-1842
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 385 bd

A storeowner, farmer, and citizen of Granby, Mass., Bela Burnett was born October 4, 1778, the second of seven children of Jonathan and Mehitabel (Dickinson) Burnett. Having relocated from Southampton, New York, to Battleboro, Vermont, in 1770, Jonathan and Mehitable settled in Granby in 1774, purchasing the farm of Aaron Nash where in 2010, Burnett descendants still live. Burnett had at least five children by two marriages, first to Clarissa Warner (1801) and second to Sally Allen (1808). Burnett died in Granby on April 16, 1846.

The Burnett account book includes careful records of goods sold, customers’ accounts, and the form and method of payment (cash, credit, or barter), as well as some information on family members and boarders, along with a handful of miscellaneous items laid in, such as calculations, notes, and a remedy for yellow jaundice.

Subjects
  • Agricultural laborers--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Barter--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Boardinghouses--Massachusetts--Granby--19th century
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Food prices--Massachusetts--Granby
  • General stores--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Granby (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Jaundice
  • Marsh, Tim A. P
  • Medicine--Formulae, receipts, prescriptions
  • Produce trade--Massachusetts--Granby--19th century
  • Robbins, Asa
  • Shopping--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Smith, David
Contributors
  • Burnett, Bela, 1778-
Types of material
  • Account books

Calkins, David

David and Marshall Calkins Account Books
1848-1855
3 vols. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 178

Brothers from Wilbraham, Mass., David and Marshall Calkins received medical degrees together at the Worcester Medical Institution in 1848. Although David died at the age of 31 in 1855 while just beginning a career, Marshall went on to build a considerable reputation in medicine, working with the Springfield City Hospital for many years and teaching at the University of Vermont.

Kept during the Calkins brothers’ years in Monson, Mass., the three daybooks that comprise this collection list patients treated and their origin or race, along with medical class notes, services provided, remedies, and forms of pay, including bartering for goods. Also included is an account of a stay in Wilbraham.

Acquired from Charles Apfelbaum, 1987
Subjects
  • Monson (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Physicians--Massachusetts--Monson
Contributors
  • Calkins, David
  • Calkins, Marshall
Types of material
  • Account books

Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Judi Chamberlin Papers
ca.1970-2010
38 boxes (57 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 768
Image of Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Gift of National Empowerment Center, 2012
Subjects
  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.
  • Psychiatric survivors movement
Contributors
  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center
Types of material
  • Videotapes

Cushing, David F., 1814-1899

David F. Cushing Records
1851-1862
2 vols. (0.2 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 248 bd

Born in Newfane, Vermont in 1814, David F. Cushing journeyed to West Medway, Massachusetts, at the age of sixteen to learn the tailor’s trade. There he met and married Polly Adams (b. 1821), who gave birth to their son, Winfield, in 1843, the first of at least nine children. Shortly after starting his family, Cushing returned home to Vermont, establishing a general store in the village of Cambridgeport, situated on the border of Grafton and Rockingham. He enjoyed considerable success in his work, rising from being listed as a “retail dealer” in the early years to a merchant; by 1860, Cushing owned real estate valued at $4,000 and personal property worth $7,000. A deacon of the Congregational church, his frequent appointment as a postmaster hints at a degree of political connection within the community to accompany his financial and personal success. He remained active in his store for 56 years until his death in 1899.

Cushing’s daybook (1860) includes lists of stock, how he acquired his goods, and the method and form of payment (cash or exchange of goods and services). The receipt book, comprised of printed forms, records freight hauling activities, with records of the freight (usually hay or oxen), weight, and date.

Subjects
  • Barter--Vermnont--Cambridgeport--19th century
  • Cambridgeport (Vt.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Freight and freightage--Rates--Vermont--19th century
  • General stores--Vermont--Cambridgeport
Contributors
  • Cushing, David F., 1814-1899
Types of material
  • Account books
  • Daybooks

Double Edge Theater

Double Edge Theatre Records
1970-2002
28 boxes (15.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 455
Image of Bold Stroke for a Wife
Bold Stroke for a Wife

Since its founding, Double Edge Theatre has embraced a two-fold mission: to develop and promote the highest quality of original theatre performance, and to create a permanent center of performance, practice, training research, and cultural exchange.

The collection documents the Theatre’s focus on research, international collaboration, and the elevation of artistic performance above and beyond stage work into the realm of cultural exchange.

Subjects
  • Experimental theater
  • Theater and society
  • Theatrical companies--Massachusetts
Contributors
  • Arnoult, Philip
  • Double Edge Theatre
  • Durand, Carroll
  • Klein, Stacy
  • Odin teatret
  • Staniewski, Wlodzimierz
  • Stowarzyszenie Teatralne "Gardzienice"
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Posters
  • Programs

Drake, Friend

Friend Drake Daybook
1856-1878
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 622 bd

For most of his adult life, Capt. Friend Drake (1799-1882) farmed his property in Sharon, Mass., and raised a large family. Drake appears to have married twice, having three children with his first wife Sarah, and 10 with his second wife Sally. His son Melzar relocated to Texas in 1858 and served in the Confederate 24th Texas Cavalry during the Civil War.

Primarily a record of small purchases and labor, this daybook was kept by Friend Drake and his son Melzar — apparently interchangeably — during the years just prior to the Civil War. Interspersed throughout the text, however, are family references and interesting vignettes, including a mention of the great “Cold storm” of January 1857, which Drake called “the toughest storm I ever faced;” an agreement with a neighbor, allowing passage rights through a meadow in exchange for permission to take a valuable large white oak “root and branch;” and Melzar’s note from Oct. 25 1858 that his 121 year old grandfather Joseph Drake had died, just as Melzar was leaving for Texas.

Subjects
  • Farming--Massachusetts--Sharon
  • Sharon (Mass.)--History
Types of material
  • Daybooks

Drucker, Jeffrey I.

Jeffrey Drucker Photograph Collection
1966-1969
387 photographs
Call no.: RG 50/6 D78
Image of Roger McGuinn being interviewed, Feb. 25, 1968
Roger McGuinn being interviewed, Feb. 25, 1968

Jeffrey Drucker was a student and photographer at the University of Massachusetts Amherst from 1966 to 1969, where he majored in production management and was the WMUA station engineer. As a student, Drucker was a photography enthusiast, taking snapshots of events across campus, thoroughly documenting his years as an undergraduate at UMass in the late-sixties.

The Jeffrey Drucker Photograph Collection contains 387 photographs of a diverse array of campus events, including the Dow Chemical protest in 1968, parades, Roister Doisters productions, musicians like Stevie Wonder and Simon and Garfunkel performing at on-campus concerts, and iconic campus buildings. Many of Drucker’s photographs were printed in the Index yearbook as well as the University of Massachusetts Daily Collegian and give a clearly student perspective to life on campus.

Subjects
  • Protests and demonstrations--Photographs
  • Rock concerts--Massachusetts--Amherst--Photographs
  • Roister Doisters (University of Massachusetts Amherst)--Photographs
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Photographs
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Students and alumni--Photographs
Types of material
  • Black-and-white negatives
  • Gelatin silver prints

Finkelstein, Sidney Walter, 1909-1974

Sidney Finkelstein Papers
1914-1974
11 boxes (5.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 128

Noted critic of music, literature, and the arts, as well as a writer and an active member of the Communist Party U.S.A. Includes letters to and from Mr. Finkelstein; original manuscripts of reviews, articles, essays, and books; legal documents, educational, military, and personal records, financial papers, contracts, photographs, and lecture and course notes.

Gift of Maynard Solomon, 1986
Subjects
  • Art criticism--United States--History--20th century
  • Communism--United States--History
  • Communist Party of the United States of America--History--20th century
  • Communist aesthetics--History--Sources
  • Culture--Study and teaching--United States--History--20th century
  • Music--History and criticism
  • Musical criticism--United States--History
  • Socialist realism--History--Sources
Contributors
  • Cohen, R. S. (Robert Sonné)
  • Finkelstein, Sidney Walter, 1909-1974
  • Gorton, Sally Kent, 1915-2000
  • Hille, Waldemar, 1908-
  • Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971
  • Lawson, John Howard, 1894-
  • Richmond, Al, 1913-1987
  • Selsam, Millicent Ellis, 1912-
  • Siegmeister, Elie, 1909-
  • Thomson, Virgil, 1896-
  • Veinus, Abraham
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs

FLURA recipients

2016

First prize: Emily Esten (2016)
“A Peculiar Project: Ethics and Analysis of the WPA Slave Narrative Collection of Oklahoma”
Honorable mention: Madeline C. Hodgman (2016)
“‘Freedom’ to Freedwomen After the Civil War”

2015

First prize: Joshua Castillo (2015)
“A Life Well Lived”
Honorable mention: Joy Silvey (2015)
“Queering the Institution: A Look at LGB Life at the University in the 1970s and 80s”

2014

First prize: Celeste Guhl (2015)
“Baby, It’s Cold Outside: Curfews for Women at the University of Massachusetts”
Honorable mention: Andrew Clinton (2014)
“Yung Wing, the Chinese Educational Mission, and the Politics of Chinese Exclusion”

2013

First prize: Ken Lefebvre (2013)
‘A Wise Conservator’: The Life and Times of Henry Hill Goodell
Honorable mention: Daniel Stein (2013)
“David versus the State: Refusal to Serve in the Israeli Defense Forces during the Lebanon War and the First Intifada: 1982-1993

2012

First prize: Justine DeCamillis (2012)
Liminal Space and Identities: The Transitional and Juxtaposition of Opposites within the Prologue, Bisclavret and Lanval of Marie de France’s Lais
Honorable mention: Peter Arsenault (2012)
Poetic Liminality in the Middle Ages: The Case of Thomas Hoccleve

2011

First prize: Christopher Russell (2010)
A Tale of Two Cities: How the Government Caused and Maintained Racial Inequality in Oakland, ca. 1945-1970”
Honorable mention: Marjorie Connolly (2011)
Anarchy to Activism: Italian Immigrant Politics During Boston’s Great Molasses Flood
Honorable mention: Sarah Goldstein (2012)
Cambodian Immigration and the Cambodian Crisis Committee

2010

First prize: Paul Kinsman
Platonic and Pythagorean Ratios in the Formal Analysis of 15th Century Music”
Honorable mention: Vanessa De Santis
The Emergence of a Class of Informed, Working Italian Immigrant Women in the Early Twentieth Century
Honorable mention: Austin Powell
Woman-As-Witch
An Analysis of Gender in Pre to Early Modern Society

2009

First prize: Name removed upon request
Honorable mention: Amy Couto
Treaty of Canandaigua: The political necessity of peace
Honorable mention: Phil Jensen
We are history, we are legend: Perspectives of American volunteers in the Spanish Civil War

Fried, Lewis

Lewis Fried Collection of Jack Conroy
1969-1995
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 414

A voice of the radical working class during the Great Depression, Jack Conroy was the son of a union organizer, born and raised in the mining camps near Moberly, Mo. His novels The Disinherited (1933) and A World to Win (1935) were among the best known works of “proletarian” American fiction to appear in the 1930s.

The Conroy Collection includes a series of 24 letters from Jack Conroy to Lewis Fried, a professor of English at Kent State University and UMass PhD, along with a small number of letters by associates of Conroy, and a selection of publications associated with or including work by him. Of particular interest are Fried’s oral history interviews with Conroy (1971) and Sally Goodman (1978).

Subjects
  • Anvil
  • Bontemps, Arna Wendell, 1902-1973
  • Communists--United States
  • Depressions--1929
  • New Anvil
  • Working class authors
Contributors
  • Conroy, Jack, 1899-1990
  • Farrell, James T. (James Thomas), 1904-1979
  • Fried, Lewis Frederick, 1943-
  • Gold, Michael, 1894-1967
  • Goodman, Percival
  • Goodman, Sally
  • Snow, Walter
Types of material
  • Oral histories
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