Results for: “Germany, East” (245 collections)SCUA

Dobrowski, Elaine

Elaine Dobrowski Boston Polish Community Collection, ca.1935-1995.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 376

Compiled by Elaine Dobrowski, this collection of photographs, printed materials, and news clippings documents the Polish community in Boston during the 1930s through the 1990s. Includes photographs of the Kosciusko Monument in the Boston Public Gardens, a children’s dance festival, and a Polish Women’s circle outing at Blinstrub’s Village as well as images of parades, receptions, and conventions.

Subjects

  • Boston (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Dobrowski, Elaine

Farber, Daniel

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Daniel and Jessie Lie Farber Photograph Collection, 1973.

9 boxes (5.75 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 022
Jonathan Butterfield, Chelmsford, 1750
Jonathan Butterfield, Chelmsford, 1750

A businessman from Worcester, Mass., Daniel Farber (1906-1998) was among the best known photographers of early American gravestone art. Over the course of twenty years beginning in about 1970, he and his wife Jessie Lie Farber (a faculty member at Mount Holyoke College) took thousands of photographs of gravestones throughout New England and the eastern United States, eventually extending their work internationally. Interested in both the artistic and cultural value of gravestones, the Farbers were founding members of the Association for Gravestone Studies in 1976 and influenced a generation of fellow researchers in gravestone studies.

Printed in 1973, the Farber Collection includes 326 black and white prints (5×7″),mounted on rag board, of of colonial and early national gravestones in Massachusetts. The towns represented, most by multiple images, include Auburn, Billerica, Boylston, Brookfield, Cambridge, Charlestown, Chelmsford, Concord. Holden, Leicester, Lexington, Marlboro, Northboro, North Brookfield, Oxford, Paxton, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Sudbury, Watertown, Wayland, and Westboro.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Farber, Daniel
  • Farber, Jessie Lie

Types of material

  • Photographs

Fowler, Robert

Robert Fowler Diary, 1831-1854.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 174

A native of Salisbury, Massachusetts, Robert Fowler (b.1805) was a prosperous shipbuilder and merchant with a trade extending from Nova Scotia to the Gulf South. He and his wife Susan Edwards, whom he married in 1830, had at least four children.

Kept by Robert Fowler between 1831 and 1854, the volume includes both diary entries (primarily 1841-1846) and accounts. With occasional commentary on local political matters, commerce, weather, and family matters, the diary is largely a record of Fowler’s spiritual concerns and his wrestling with doctrinal matters and the relationship of religion and daily life. An ardent temperance man, he commented on religious topics ranging from the Millerite movement to the resurrection, salvation, and the duty of prayer.

Subjects

  • Fatherhood
  • Fitch, Charles, 1805-1844
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Salisbury
  • Millerite movement
  • Religious life--Massachusetts--Salisbury
  • Salisbury (Mass.)--History
  • Second Advent
  • Temperance

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Diaries

German Military Personnel

German Military Personnel Photograph Collection, ca. 1930-1939.

2 boxes (0.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 384

Photographs from the 1930s and 1940s featuring both major government officials such as Hitler, Goebbels, and Himmler, and lower ranking officials such as regional party leaders. Photographs of German soldiers with their various weapons, some possibly fighting, are also depicted. Includes film stills from the Allied invasion of Normandy and German Communist refugees in the Soviet Union.

Subjects

  • Germans--Photographs
  • Nazis--Photographs
  • World War, 1939-1945

Types of material

  • Photographs

Hill, Aurin F.

Aurin F. Hill Papers, 1885-1929.

8 boxes (6 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 579
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,<br />ca.1928
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,
ca.1928

The self-styled “insane architect” Aurin F. Hill (b. 1853) was a free thinking carpenter and architect in Boston who waged a concerted campaign for his vision of social reform at the turn of the twentieth century. A Spiritualist, social radical, and union man, Hill carried the torch for issues ranging from the nationalization of railroads and corporations to civil rights and women’s rights, and joined in opposition to vaccination, Comstockery and censorship, capital punishment, and lynching. A writing medium, married to the Spiritual evangelist Izetta Sears-Hill, he became President of the National Spiritual Alliance in 1915, a Spiritualist organization based in Lake Pleasant, Mass.

Esoteric, rambling, and often difficult to follow, the Hill papers provide profound insight into the eclectic mind of an important Boston Spiritualist and labor activist at the turn of the twentieth century. Whether written as a diary or scattered notes, a scrapbook, essays, or letters to the editor, Hill’s writings cover a wide range of topics, from spirit influence to labor law, from his confinements for insanity to police strikes, hypnotism, reincarnation, and housing. More than just a reflection of one man’s psychology, the collection reveals much about broader social attitudes toward gender and race, sexuality, urban life, politics, and religion, and the collection is a particularly important resource for the history of the American Spiritualist movement between 1890 and 1920.

Subjects

  • Architects--Massachusetts--Boston
  • Boston (Mass.)--History
  • Carpenters--Labor unions
  • Hypnotism
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Lake Pleasant (Mass.)--History
  • Mediums--Massachusetts
  • Montague (Mass.)--History
  • National Spiritual Alliance
  • Spiritualism
  • United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America

Contributors

  • Hill, Aurin F.
  • Sears-Hill, Izetta B.

Types of material

  • Diaries
  • Scrapbooks

Historic Burying Grounds Initiative

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Historic Burying Grounds Initiative Collection, 1876-1985.

2 boxes (0.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 689

With the approach of the American Bicentennial in 1976, concern grew among historic preservationists in Boston that the city’s old cemeteries and grave markers were showing the damage of many decades of harsh weather and poor maintenance. Led by the Boston Parks and Recreation Department, the Boston Landmarks Commission, and The Bostonian Society, with the collaboration of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, and the Association for Gravestone Studies, among others, the Historic Burying Grounds Initiative was established to develop a plan to inventory over 15,000 markers and assemble a master plan (1985, updated 1998) to care for the cemeteries in the long term. Supported by both public and private funds, the HBGI focused initially on stabilization, preservation, and restoration of historic artifacts, tomb structures, and retaining walls, and their efforts continue today.

The HBGI Collection contains reports and inventories from the first phase of work carried out by the Initiative, focusing on the Dorchester North, Central, Copp’s Hill, Eliot, Granary, Kings Chapel, and Phipps Street Burying Grounds. The collection also contains two editions of the Manual for Preservation prepared by the HBGI.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Conservation and restoration
  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Historic Burying Grounds Initiative

Hodges, C.W., b. 1824

C.W. and J.F. Hodges Account Books, 1862-1865.

2 vols. (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 209

In the 1860 census, brothers Charles W. (b. 1824) and Joseph F. (b. 1828) Hodges resided in the same house along with Charles’ wife Mary and their year old son Charles Jr. These two account books are presumed to be the customer ledgers of the Hodges and Messinger grocery store in Foxborough, Massachusetts, based on the list of customers and their proximity to the store in the 1876 county atlas.

Subjects

  • Foxborough (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Grocers--Massachusetts--Foxborough

Types of material

  • Account books

Holden, Flora A. M.

Flora A. M. Holden Cookbook, ca.1870-1896.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 488 bd

Born in Marlboro, Mass., on July 28, 1849, Flora Ann Martin Ellithorp married Frank B. Holden of the adjacent town of Hudson on Nov. 22, 1871. The couple had three children: Marion Carlton, Fred Tracy, and Beatrice Spurr. Flora was just 35 when she died of liver cancer on May 24, 1885.

Holden’s manuscript receipt book includes recipes for a variety of baked goods and desserts, but primarily cakes and custards. Although some of the recipes may be original to her or her family, others are clearly attributed to other writers and some may have been derived from published cookbooks. Among the recipes are some of the most popular dishes of the era, including Parker House rolls, Washington pie, and Graham bread.

Subjects

  • Bread
  • Cake
  • Cooking, American--Massachusetts--Hudson
  • Desserts
  • Puddings

Contributors

  • Lockey, Marion Carlton

Types of material

  • Cookbooks
  • Recipes

Judice, Edward

Edward Judice Photograph Collection, 1973-2010.

281 digital images, 2 videos
Call no.: PH 046
Lathe operator, Rodney Hunt co., 1974
Lathe operator, Rodney Hunt co., 1974

Raised on Long Island, Ed Judice embarked on a path in photography at the age of 13 when he took a job sweeping floors in a local photo studio. After picking up work photographing locally and a stint in the army, he moved to New York city, Judice began doing commercial work for ad agencies and magazines and eventually with Polaroid. Through Polaroid, he began developing contacts in western Massachusetts, eventually moving to Wendell in the early 1970s. He maintains an active studio in Northampton.

The Judice collection consists of a series of 59 digital images relating to a photo documentation project at the Rodney Hunt factory in Orange, Mass., in 1973 and 1974; a series of photographs documenting the bicentennial of Wendell in 1981; and two video documentaries of the Three County Fair, Northampton, Mass., 2007, and “Benny and Joe: A friendship,” 2010.

Subjects

  • Foundry workers--Massachusetts--Orange
  • Northampton (Mass.)
  • Rodney Hunt Company
  • Serrazina, Joe
  • Shoemakers--Massachusetts--Northampton
  • Shu-Fix (Northampton, Mass.)
  • Strojny, Benny.
  • Wendell (Mass.)--Centennial celebrations, etc.

Contributors

  • Judice, Edward

Types of material

  • Digital images
  • Video recordings

Kahn, Paul S.

Paul S. Kahn Papers, 1964-2009.

10 boxes (17 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 786
Paul Kahn
Paul Kahn

An artist, writer, and activist for the disabled, Paul S. Kahn was born on Nov. 6, 1945, into a second-generation family of Jewish immigrants in Auburndale, Mass. Early in life, Kahn rebelled against the perceived “powerlessness” of the neuromuscular disorder with which he was born, pursuing an artistic, academic, and activist life. While studying drawing, painting, and sculpture at Boston University and earning a MA in counseling at Northeastern (1982), Kahn became an activist in the independent living movement and a pioneer in advocating for personal care assistance. Living independently from 1979, he worked as staff therapist at the Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center, as leader of a support group for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, and as a member of the Massachusetts Governor’s Advisory Commission on Disability Policy. In 1980, Kahn met Ruth Stern, who would become his frequent collaborator and wife of 21 years. As Kahn’s physical condition weakened after 1987 and he became dependent upon a ventilator, his creative focus shifted increasingly from art to writing and editing. The last two decades of his life were remarkably productive, resulting in over twenty plays and dozens of published essays and poems, and he was the long-time editor of the newsletter Disability Issues. Kahn died on Jan. 1, 2010.

Paul Kahn’s papers are a reflection of the intensely creative life of a committed activist. The collection centers on Kahn’s literary work, including manuscripts of his plays, essays, and poetry, but it includes numerous examples of his artwork and a number of home movies and tape recordings from his childhood.

Subjects

  • People with disabilities and the arts
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights

Types of material

  • Paintings (Visual works)
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