Results for: “Freedom of the press” (161 collections)SCUA

UMass Amherst. Faculty and Staff

UMass Amherst. Faculty and Staff, 1863-2007.


Call no.: RG 40

The faculty at UMass Amherst has grown from five when Massachusetts Agricultural College opened its doors in 1869 to nearly 1,200 full time members in 2009.

In addition to extensive documentation of the Faculty Senate and other groups, RG 40 includes documentation of over 5,000 individual members of UMass Amherst faculty and staff, with information ranging from vitae and resumes to research notes, newsclippings, and publications, mostly originating with or gathered by the University or University Archives. The personal and professional papers of individual faculty members are housed and entered into UMarmot separately (with call numbers beginning FS), and materials for faculty who also held administrative posts may be filed in the relevant record group(s).

Subjects

  • Universities and colleges--Faculty--Labor unions
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty

Contributors

  • Massachusetts Society of Professors
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Faculty Senate

UMass Amherst. Faculty and Staff

UMass Amherst Faculty and Staff Collection, ca.1867-2008.

175 boxes (84 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 40/11
Pres. Hugh P. Baker and<br />Cabinet of Faculty, 1936
Pres. Hugh P. Baker and
Cabinet of Faculty, 1936

From its founding in 1863, UMass Amherst has grown from rural agricultural roots into a major research university, and the handful of instructors who present at the inauguration of the college has grown into a diverse faculty of over 1,100.

The Faculty and Staff Collection contains files accumulated by the University Archives relating to the faculty, staff, and administrators of UMass Amherst and its predecessors, the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Massachusetts State College. This list is not an exhaustive accounting of present or past members of the UMass community: although full-time, part-time, and visiting faculty are included, this listing includes only those for whom the University Office of Communications or University Archives collected information. Typically these files consist of some combination of resumes, notices of honors and awards, press releases and news clippings, articles about or by the subject, obituaries, and other miscellaneous information. In many cases, the subjects are represented by only one or two items.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts Agricultural College
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Staff
  • Massachusetts State College
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts State College--Staff
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Staff

Types of material

  • Clippings (Information artifacts)
  • Obituaries

UMass Amherst. Graduate School

UMass Amherst. Graduate School, 1896-2007.

(70 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 10

The University of Massachusetts Amherst has offered graduate education since 1896, awarding more than 11,360 doctoral and 37,480 master’s degrees. With a graduate faculty of 1,100 (2006), the Amherst campus offers 50 programs leading to a doctorate and 68 programs toward a master’s degree.

Included in the records of the Graduate School are files related to the the Dean of the School, its graduate programs, and the records of the Boston Office of the University Press.

Subjects

  • Graduate students--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Graduate School
  • University of Massachusetts Press

UMass Amherst. Public Affairs

UMass Amherst. Public Affairs, 1866-2007.

(73.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 5

Public relations efforts at UMass have shifted over the years from an early emphasis on education in agriculture and home economics to contemporary efforts to manage the torrent of information generated by a research university. The first news editor at UMass was not appointed until 1948, and as late as 1961, the entire central Public Relations staff consisted only of a news and publications editor, although the College of Agriculture hosted a separate staff of five. Since the 1960s, however, the public relations efforts have expanded as rapidly as the University as a whole. The position of Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development was created in 1983, (called Vice Chancellor for University Advancement after 1993) to oversee public affairs, alumni relations, and development activities.

This record group consists of materials from the several offices concerned with the production of University publications and publicity. The records include press releases, brochures, guidebooks, newsclippings, newsletters, bulletins, weekly newspapers, semi-monthly feature publications, special publications and photographic negatives. Also included in this group are the following publications: Chancellor’s Monthly Press Briefings, Chancellor’s Annual Review of NewsClips, Commonwealth Research Reports, Campus Guidebooks, University Newsletter, Weekly Bulletin, Executive Bulletin, University Bulletin, brochures, Contact, UMass, Science Journal, University Notebook, Tips, News Summary, and the Commonwealth Journal.

Subjects

  • Public relations--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Office of Public Affairs

UMass Amherst. University as a Whole

UMass Amherst. University as a Whole, 1849-2007.

(82.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 1

Established under the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1863, the Massachusetts Agricultural College began with four faculty members and 56 students distributed among four wooden buildings and acres of farms, orchards, and fields. In keeping with the progressive educational principles of its early years, the College offered advanced instruction in the eminently practical pursuit of agriculture, while its fellow land grant college, MIT, covered the mechanical arts. Although “Mass Aggie’s” fortunes waxed and waned, it grew to become Massachusetts State College in 1931, and the University of Massachusetts in 1947.

Among the official publications of the University in Record Group 1 are institutional histories, annual reports, special reports, minutes, directories, catalogs, newsclippings, press releases, and memorabilia.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst

Valley Women’s History Collaborative

Valley Women's History Collaborative Records, 1971-2008.

15 boxes (10 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 531

During the early phases of second wave feminism (1968-1978), the Pioneer Valley served as a center for lesbian and feminist activity in western Massachusetts, and was home to over 400 hundred, often ad hoc, groups, such as the Abortion and Birth Control (ABC) Committee, ISIS Women’s Center, the Mudpie Childcare Cooperative, and the Springfield Women’s Center.

The records of the Valley Women’s History Collaborative document the activities of these groups as well as the efforts of the founders of the Women Studies program and department at UMass Amherst to preserve this history. Of particular value are the many oral histories conducted by the collaborative that record the history of women’s activism in the Pioneer Valley, especially as it relates to reproductive rights.

Subjects

  • Abortion--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--History--20th century
  • Birth control--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--History--20th century
  • Feminism--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--History
  • Feminists--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity--History
  • Mary Vazquez Women's Softball League
  • Women--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity--History

Contributors

  • Valley Women's History Collaborative

Types of material

  • Oral histories

Wallace, Karl Richards, 1905-1973

Karl Richards Wallace Papers, 1898-1976.

(14.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 086

Educator, rhetorician, author, President of the Speech Association of America in 1954, and Professor of Speech at the University of Massachusetts Amherst from 1968-1973.

Includes the accumulated research notes and materials written and used by Wallace in his career as a teacher and author; drafts, reprints, and proofs of his speeches, papers, articles, and books, both published and unpublished, often with accompanying correspondence, research notes, and/or contracts; lecture notes and classroom materials dating from his years as a student through those as a teacher; drafts and reprints of papers and articles by students and colleagues; correspondence; the reports, memoranda, correspondence, resolutions, agenda, notes on meetings, minutes, committee recommendations, position papers, newsletters, audit reports, budget recommendations, membership lists, itineraries, and programs indicative of his leadership and active participation in the Speech Association of America and other professional organizations, conferences, and university committees.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English

Contributors

  • Wallace, Karl Richards, 1905-1973

Waugh, Frank A. (Frank Albert), 1869-1943

Frank A. Waugh Papers, 1896-1983.


Call no.: FS 088
Frank A Waugh with flute
Frank A Waugh with flute

Born in Wisconsin but raised and educated in Kansas, Frank Waugh got his first teaching job at Oklahoma State University. He went on to teach at the University of Vermont and finally settled down in Amherst, as a professor at Massachusetts Agricultural College. While at Mass Aggie, he became well know for establishing the second landscape gardening department in the country, later the department of landscape architecture. At a time when the field of landscape architecture was still taking root, Waugh’s influence was significant in shaping the profession. His contributions include numerous articles and books, the designs he planned and implemented, and the many students he taught and mentored. A natural offshoot of his work as a landscape architect, Waugh pursued other artistic avenues as well, most notably photography and etching. He served at MAC, later Massachusetts State College, for nearly forty years before retiring in 1939.

The collection includes an extensive representation of Waugh’s published articles along with biographical materials. The centerpiece, however, is the large number of photographs, lantern slides, and etchings. While his publications reveal the mind of a pioneer in his field, together these images portray the heart and soul of Waugh as an artist.

Subjects

  • Landscape architecture--United States--History
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Horticulture

Contributors

  • Waugh, Frank A. (Frank Albert), 1869-1943

Types of material

  • Etchings
  • Lantern slides
  • Photographs

Westhampton Congregational Church (Westhampton, Mass.)

Westhampton Congregational Church Records, 1817-1970.

17 vols. (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 806

The Congregational Church in Westhampton, Mass., was formally organized on Sept. 1, 1779, with the installation of a young graduate of Yale, Enoch Hale, brother of the patriot Nathan Hale. At the end of Hale’s fifty years in the Westhampton pulpit, the church experienced a crisis that resulted in the separation of a portion of the membership as the Union Church, led by the charismatic evangelical preacher John Truair. The churches were reunited in 1850.

The records of the Westhampton Congregational Church document nearly two hundreds of religious life in a rural western Massachusetts community. Beginning with the founding of the church in 1779, the collection include a nearly unbroken record of church activities including thorough records of membership, transfers, marriages, baptisms, deaths, and church discipline, and for the latter century, a complete record of church finances. Of particular note is a volume recording the activities of the secessionist Union Church, 1829-1849.

Subjects

  • Congregational churches--Massachusetts--Westhampton
  • Hale, Enoch, 1753-1837
  • Revivals--Massachusetts--Westhampton
  • Second Great Awakening
  • Truair, John, 1780-1845
  • Westhampton (Mass.)--Religious life and customs

Contributors

  • Union Church (Westhampton, Mass.)

Types of material

  • Account books

Wilder, Marshall P.

Marshall P. Wilder Collection, 1848-1929.

3 boxes (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 2/3 W55
Marshall P. Wilder
Marshall P. Wilder

A merchant and amateur horticulturalist from Dorchester, Mass., Marshall P. Wilder (1798-1886) was a key figure in American pomology during the mid-nineteenth century and a major supporter of agricultural education. A supreme organizer and institution builder, he was a founder and president of the American Pomological Society and United States Agricultural Society, and president of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and New England Historic Genealogical Society. His 1849 address before the Norfolk Agricultural Society is often credited as an important catalyst for the creation of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, and he served as trustee of the College from its opening in 1867 until his death in 1886.

The Wilder Collection consists primarily of printed works written or collected by Marshall P. Wilder, including materials pertaining to early meetings of the American Pomological Society and the United States Agricultural Society, his 1849 address to the Norfolk Agricultural Society, and his address to the first graduating class at MAC. Among the handful of manuscripts are a draft proposal to hold a national meeting of fruit growers (the inaugural meeting of the American Pomological Society), two letters regarding his donation of a large number of books to the MAC library, and a bound set of 22 beautiful watercolors of pear varieties painted by Louis B. Berckmans.

Subjects

  • Agricultural exhibitions
  • American Pomological Society
  • Horticulture--Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Trustees
  • New-England Historic Genealogical Society
  • Pomology--Massachusetts
  • United States Agricultural Society

Contributors

  • Wilder, Marshall P. (Marshall Pinckney), 1798-1886

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)
Special Collections and University Archives logo