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Wright, John

John Wright Account Books

1818-1859
9 vols. 3 linear feet
Call no.: MS 162

Descendants of one of the founding families of Northampton, Mass., John Wright and his brother Samuel were farmers and freight haulers during the first half of the nineteenth century. Before the 1840s, the brothers hauled freight by wagon from Northampton as far away as Hartford and Boston, however the advent of lower-cost carriers over canal and rail, led them to restrict their operations to a local clientele.

The Wright collection includes nine bound volumes and four folders of loose material associated with the businesses of John Wright, his brother Samuel, and son Edwin. They document the growth of a freight hauling firm that supported a substantial trade stretching to Boston, as well as the eventual decline of that business.

Subjects

Farmers--Massachusetts--NorthamptonFreight and freightage--MassachusettsNorthampton (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century

Types of material

Account books
Wyman, Eunice P.

Eunice P. Wyman Account Book

1814-1840
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 163 bd

Account book of Eunice P. Wyman of Concord, Massachusetts documenting financial transactions relating to her farm and homestead. She gained income not only from selling products (butter, soap, syrup for a sick man, pigs), but also through selling the services of her sons John and Franklin (picking apples, driving cows, digging potatoes, butchering, digging wells, shoveling gravel) and renting half her house to a man who paid, in part, by performing chores (putting rockers on an arm chair, white washing two rooms, making a flower box).

Wyman’s goods and her sons’ services were typically paid for in cash or by exchange of goods or services (cider and vinegar, wool, by driving her cattle home from Stoddard’s pasture, shoemaking, plowing the garden, by “himself and oxen to go into town to get 23 rails and 11 posts,” use of wagons, horses, carts, and oxen). Customers have been identified as being from Concord, Carlisle, Acton, and Westford. The account book includes records of grocer Porter Kimball of Sterling, Massachusetts (1814), and recipes.

Acquired from: Charles Apfelbaum, 1987

Subjects

Concord (Mass.)--History--19th centuryFarmers--Massachusetts--Concord

Types of material

Account books
Yeats, W. B. (William Butler), 1865-1939

Russell K. Alspach Collection of William Butler Yeats

1888-1984
ca.475 items 35 linear feet
Call no.: RB 014

The Irish poet W.B. Yeats was a key figure in the Celtic literary revival of the early twentieth century. Born into an artistic family in Dublin in 1865, Yeats was heavily influenced early in his career by Irish folk literature and Theosophical mysticism, but he was simultaneously rooted in the political issues of the day. An Irish nationalist by inclination, he became a two-term Senator in the Irish Free State and he was a key supporter of the arts and theatre in the new nation. His international reputation was cemented when he received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1923. Yeats died in 1939 at the age of 73.

The Alspach collection consists of hundreds of works by and about W.B. Yeats, collected by Yeats scholar Russell K. Alspach, a member of the UMass English faculty. An extensive assemblage with first editions of most of the key works, the collection also includes critical works on Yeats, works by his literary peers, bibliographies, and items published by the Cuala Press, a private press operated by Yeats’s sister Elizabeth that was a strong influence in the Celtic revival. A few items have been added to the collection since its acquisition in 1971.

Subjects

Irish poetry--20th century

Contributors

Alspach, Russell K. (Russell King), 1901-Cuala Press
Restrictions: Collection currently unavailable due to renovation in SCUA
Young Women’s City Club (Northhampton, Mass.)

Young Women's City Club Records

1931-1981
2 boxes 0.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 045

Known as Girl’s City Club until 1954, the Young Women’s City Club was a non-sectarian, self-governing, and largely self-supporting club in Northampton, Massachusetts, that developed educational and recreational opportunities for young women through programs, social events, volunteer services, and fund-raising activities. The club met regularly under the auspices of the People’s Institute until November 1979 when their rooms at James House were taken over by the Highland Valley Elder Service and the club relocated to the People’s Institute.

The records of the Young Women’s City Club document the growth and activities of the club from 1939 to 1981, with the exception of the decade 1961 to 1971. Consisting of photocopies of originals still held by the People’s Institute, the collection includes minutes of council and business meetings and scrapbook pages.

Gift of Margaret Hutchins, People's Institute, 1985

Subjects

Women--Societies and clubs--Massachusetts

Contributors

Young Women's City Club (Northampton, Mass.)
Zickler Family

Zickler Family Scrapbook

1952
1 vol. 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 446
Depiction of Zicklers on a picnic
Zicklers on a picnic

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Zickler of Leominster, Massachusetts began a 3 month cross-country road trip on March 27, 1952. Mrs. Zickler created a scrapbook to document the trip. The scrapbook includes souvenir and original photographs, postcards, maps, and other miscellaneous memorabilia from the journey. Their stops include various tourist attractions as well as scenic areas throughout the Midwest and Southwest of the United States. Most of their time was spent in Oraibi, the oldest continuously inhabited community in North America, on the Navajo Gospel Mission. The Zicklers returned to Leominster in July 1952, having traveled a total of 10,404 miles.

The scrapbook spans the entirety of the Zickler’s trip. It includes postcards, souvenir photographs from tourist locations such as the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone National Park, the Big Rock Candy Mountain, Hoover Dam, the Petrified Forest (as well as a piece of wood from the Forest), placemats and matchboxes from Las Vegas, and numerous souvenir photographs of the Navajo Gospel Mission.

Acquired from Peter Masi, Apr. 2005

Subjects

Arizona--Description and travelAutomobile travelCalifornia--Description and travelGrand Canyon (Ariz.)Navajo Gospel MissionNevada--Description and travelOraibi (Ariz.)United States--Description and travelYellowstone National ParkZickler family

Contributors

Zickler, Ernest

Types of material

PhotographsScrapbooks
Alvord, Henry E.

Henry E. Alvord Papers

1859-1866
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 037

An officer in the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry during the Civil War, Henry Alvord (1844-1904) became a Professor of Dairy Science at Massachusetts Agricultural College and a founder of the American Association of Land Grant Colleges. He went on to a distinguished career in education and work with agricultural experiment stations in Maryland and Oklahoma.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty

Contributors

Alvord, Henry E
Boardman, Charles M.

Charles M. Boardman Papers

1919-1949
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 035

A member of of QTV fraternity, Charles Meade Boardman graduated from the Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1920 with a degree in landscape gardening.

Boardman’s Papers include two of his college yearbooks, a smattering of correspondence from the 1920s relating to landscape gardening, and approximately 30 photographs, apparently taken during or shortly after his time at MAC.

Subjects

Landscape gardeningUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--Students

Contributors

Boardman, Charles M
Chadbourne, Paul A. (Paul Ansel),1823-1883

Paul A. Chadbourne Papers

1865-1883
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 003/1 C43
Depiction of Paul A. Chadbourne
Paul A. Chadbourne

After distinguishing himself as a chemist on the faculty at Williams College and serving one term in the State Senate, Paul Chadbourne was called upon in 1866 to become the second president of Massachusetts Agricultural College. Although he pressed an ambitious agenda for building a College from scratch, ill health forced him to resign only a year later. He returned to MAC after holding faculty positions in Wisconsin and at Williams, filling a second stint as president from 1882 until his death in 1883. Though brief, he set an important precedent by creating a “scientific and literary” track of study to complement the “agricultural and scientific” one, and by pushing for the financial support of poor students.

The collection includes correspondence of and about Chadbourne, drafts of speeches and sermons, published writings, biographical and genealogical material, and reports from the Massachusetts Board of Agriculture (1865-1881).

Subjects

Agricultural education--MassachusettsMassachusetts Agricultural College. President

Contributors

Chadbourne, Paul A. (Paul Ansel),1823-1883
Flint, Charles L. (Charles Louis), 1824-1889

Charles L. Flint Papers

1854-1887
3 boxes 1.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 003/1 F55
Depiction of Charles L. Flint
Charles L. Flint

Born in Middleton, Massachusetts, in 1824, Charles L. Flint worked his way through Harvard, graduating in 1849, taught for a short time, then returned to Harvard in 1850 to enter the Law School. In 1853, he left his law practice to become secretary of the newly formed Massachusetts Board of Agriculture, remaining in that position for 27 years. He had a part in the founding of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was a member of the Boston School Committee, and as one of the founders of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, he served as secretary of the Board of Trustees for 22 years. Selected during a budgetary crisis, Charles L. Flint agreed to serve as President of Massachusetts Agricultural College without a salary. For four years he gave lectures at the college on dairy farming. Upon the resignation of President William Smith Clark in 1879, Flint was elected President, though he served only until the spring of 1880.

The Flint collection contains an assortment of photographs; reports as Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Agriculture, 1854-1881; and printed versions of published writings.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College. PresidentMassachusetts. Board of Agriculture

Contributors

Flint, Charles L. (Charles Louis), 1824-1889

Types of material

Photographs
French, Henry F. (Henry Flagg), 1813-1885

Henry Flagg French Papers

1860-1974
40 items 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 003/1 F74
Depiction of Henry Flagg French
Henry Flagg French

Although Henry Flagg French was selected as the first president of the new Massachusetts Agricultural College, he served in that office for barely two years. A graduate of Dartmouth and Harvard Law School, French was a strong proponent of scientific agriculture, but in 1866, after falling out with the college administration over campus design, he resigned his office, leaving before the first students were actually admitted.

The French collection includes a suitably small body of correspondence, including 16 letters (1864-1866) from French to the original campus landscape designer, Frederick Law Olmsted, and letters and reports from French to college officials, together with published writings, biographical material about French and his son, sculptor Daniel Chester French (1850-1931), and photographs. In part, these are copies of originals in the Frederick Law Olmsted Papers at American University, Washington, DC.

Subjects

French, Daniel Chester, 1850-1931Massachusetts Agricultural CollegeMassachusetts Agricultural College. President

Contributors

French, Henry F. (Henry Flagg), 1813-1885Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903