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Collection area: UMass alumni (page 3 of 5)

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Kraner, Doug

Doug Kraner Collection, 1978-2014
3 boxes, 7 tubes (4 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 942
Image of Doug Kraner (right)<br />© Photo By <a href=Myles Aronowitz" title="Image of Doug Kraner (right)
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Doug Kraner (right)
© Photo By Myles Aronowitz

With an MFA in theater from UMass Amherst (1979), Doug Kraner built a career of thirty five years that grew from scenic design for the stage into production design for feature films and television. After his time in Amherst, Kraner taught at SUNY Stonybrook and worked on and off-Broadway, but by 1981, he moved to Hollywood and began a film career as set decorator for My Dinner With Andre (1981). Among dozens of credits as art director or production designer, Kraner worked on commercially successful films such as Uncle Buck, Lean on Me, Sleeping with the Enemy (which was the start of a long and productive working relationship with the director Danny Cannon), Extreme Measures, and I Still Know What You Did Last Summer. He received an Emmy nomination in 1983 for Little Gloria… Happy at Last, and in his work on the television show Gotham in 2014-2015 earned both Emmy and Art Directors Guild Award nominations. After a lengthy struggle with cancer, Kraner died on April 4, 2016.

Organized project by project, the Kraner collection includes a cross-section of work from a production designer in the film and television industries from the 1980s to 2010s. Although the depth of coverage and contents vary from film to film, the files may contain anything from rough concept sketches to finished designs, photographs of three-dimensional models, and schematics for the construction of sets, and in the aggregate, the work documents the transition from paper-based to purely digital production techniques. Kraner retained a small number of sketches from his time as a graduate student at UMass Amherst, two sketchbooks, and a portfolio of his work for film.

Gift of Ron Duby, Sept. 2016

Lenn, Marjorie Peace

Marjorie Peace Lenn Papers, ca.1980-2010
40 boxes (60 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 838
Image of Marjorie Peace Lenn
Marjorie Peace Lenn

A leader in the global quality assurance movement in higher education, Marjorie Peace Lenn was founding president of the Center for Quality Assurance in International Education (CQAIE). Born in Bowling Green, Ohio, in 1946, and educated at Transylvania University (BA, 1968), Yale (MAR, 1970), and UMass Amherst (MEd and EdD, 1978), Lenn began her career in education as as assistant area director of student life at UMass Amherst, rising over the course of twelve years (1970-1982) to become the Director of Residential Life. From UMass, Lenn went on to senior positions with the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (1982-1992) before founding the CQAIE in 1991. Throughout her career, Lenn was in high demand internationally as a consultant on quality assurance and accreditation systems. Working with dozens of governments, ministries of education, universities, and intergovernmental agencies such as the World Bank, UNESCO, OECD, Organization of American States, United Nations Development Program, and the Asia Development Bank, she also became an official advisor to the U.S. government on trade in education services as a member of the International Trade Advisory Commission, influencing the development of accreditation infrastructure in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. After a long battle with cancer, Lenn died at home in Alexandria, Va., on Oct. 16, 2010.

The Lenn Papers offer rich documentation of the international development of accreditation systems in higher education and the impact of Lenn’s ideas on quality assurance. The bulk of the records stem from Lenn’s work with the Center for Quality Assurance in International Education and Council on Postsecondary Accreditation, but also reflect her role as advisor to the US government and her varied consultancies.

Subjects
  • Center for Quality Assurance in International Education
  • Council on Postsecondary Accreditation
  • Education, Higher--Evaluation
  • Quality assurance

Lyons, Louis Martin

Louis Martin Lyons Papers, 1918-1980
(4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: RG 002/3 L96
Image of Louis M. Lyons
Louis M. Lyons

As a journalist with the Boston Globe, a news commentator on WGBH television, and Curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, Louis M. Lyons was an important public figure in the New England media for over fifty years. A 1918 graduate of Massachusetts Agricultural College and later trustee of UMass Amherst, Lyons was an vocal advocate for freedom of the press and a highly regarded commentator on the evolving role of media in American society.

The Lyons Papers contain a selection of correspondence, lectures, and transcripts of broadcasts relating primarily to Lyons’ career in television and radio. From the McCarthy era through the end of American involvement in Vietnam, Lyons addressed topics ranging from local news to international events, and the collection offers insight into transformations in American media following the onset of television and reaction both in the media and the public to events such as the assassinations of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, the war in Vietnam, and the social and political turmoil of the 1960s.

Subjects
  • Boston Globe
  • Civil rights movements
  • Freedom of the Press
  • Frost, Robert, 1874-1963
  • Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973
  • Journalistic ethics
  • Journalists--Massachusetts--Boston
  • Kennedy, John Fitzgerald, 1917-1963
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • Television
  • University of Massachusetts. Trustees
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975
  • WGBH (Television station : Boston, Mass.)
  • World War, 1914-1918
Contributors
  • Lyons, Louis Martin, 1897-
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Speeches

Maginnis, John J.

John J. Maginnis and Arthur Howard Military Government of Europe Collection, 1944-1946
12 boxes (9.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 405

Papers of General John J. Maginnis and Colonel Arthur Howard, both of the MAC Class of 1918, from their experience as part of the American Military Government of Europe following World War II.

The Arthur Howard Papers (8 linear feet) deal with the restoration of food production in the war ravaged “breadbasket of South Germany,” Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, and the Wurttemberg Baden area. Col. Howard (at that time a Major) was a specialist in food and food processing, and his charge extended to the rehabilitation of supporting industries; he also made repairs of the Karlsruhe and Mannheim harbors.

The John J. Maginnis papers (1.5 linear feet) deal with the processes of government of European areas just delivered from German occupation, and of German areas newly occupied by Allied troops. General Maginnis (at that time a Major and then a Colonel) was an administrator successively in Normandy and Ardennes in France; Hainaut, Belgium; and Berlin.

Subjects
  • Military government--Germany
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Howard, Arthur

Manchester, William Raymond, 1922-

William Manchester Papers, 1941-1988
4 boxes (1.75 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 433

William Manchester was a journalist, educator, and author, best known for his biographies of President John F. Kennedy, Douglas MacArthur and Winston Churchill. This collection consists primarily of letters from Manchester to his mother written during his service with the 29th Marines in World War II. Manchester later described his war-time experiences in a memoir entitled Goodbye, Darkness.

Subjects
  • Massachusetts State College--Students
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Manchester, William Raymond, 1922-
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Marino, Michella M.

Michella Marino Oral History Collection, 2011-2012
23 items
Call no.: MS 812

Michella Marino received her doctorate from the Department History of at UMass Amherst in May 2013. Her dissertation, Sweating femininity: women athletes, masculine culture, and American inequality from 1930 to the present, drew on extensive oral historical and archival research to examine how feminist women negotiated the cultural boundaries surrounding gender to carve out identities as women, athletes, and mothers. Focusing on women’s participation in two sports, basketball and roller derby, Marino wrote that her goal was to “explain the tension between women’s representation and agency, between cultural constructs and women’s lives, between images of women and their individual identities.”

The Marino Collection consists of 23 oral historical interviews with female and male participants in roller derby and basketball.

Gift of Michella Marino, Feb. 2014
Subjects
  • Roller derby
  • Sex discrimination in sports--History
  • Sports for women
  • Women athletes
  • Women's basketball
Types of material
  • Oral histories

Memory Corps

Memory Corps oral histories, 2011-2012

Memory Corps was launched in 2011 to collect brief oral histories of the alumni of UMass Amherst. Interviews will include alumni from throughout the history of the university and center on memories of their experiences at UMass and their careers since.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Alumni
Types of material
  • Oral histories

Millman, George H. (George Harold), 1919-

George Millman Papers, 1944-1945
3 boxes (3 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 728
Image of George and Lillian Millman
George and Lillian Millman

Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1919, George Millman attended Massachusetts State College briefly, but was forced to drop out after his freshman year due to financial hardship. After attending a three-month intensive training course, Millman was employed by the War Department in 1941 as a civilian inspector in the munitions plant in New London, Connecticut. In the months that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor, he felt it was his patriotic duty to join the armed forces and enlisted on May 28, 1942. Called to active duty six months later, Millman was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps on April 29, 1943. Already dating his soon-to-be-bride Lillian, the couple decided to marry immediately before he could be sent overseas. Assigned to a class on the theoretical aspects of radar at Harvard University, Millman was ordered to report to the Army Air Force Technical School in Boca Raton in late 1943. On June 24, 1944, he received secret travel orders assigning him to the 5th Air Force Service Command in Brisbane, Australia. There he began training fighter pilots on the use and operation of the newly developed airborne radar, AN/APS-4. Throughout his tour in the Pacific, which ended in early 1946, Millman traveled throughout the region, including time in Australia, the Netherlands East Indies, the Netherlands New Guinea, and the Philippines.

Containing almost 400 letters written to his wife Lillian during World War II, Millman’s papers detail nearly every aspect of life in the service during wartime. From chronicling extreme environmental conditions to his feelings of frustration while awaiting assignment, Millman’s letters offer a personal perspective of the impact of war on an individual and his loved ones. While his letters carefully avoid any details about his work that could have been censored, they capture in extraordinary detail the day-to-day life of a serviceman in the Pacific theater during WWII. Millman published his letters to his wife in 2011 in a book entitled Letters to Lillian.

Subjects
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Millman, George H. (George Harold), 1919-
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Mosakowski, Ken

Ken Mosakowski Papers, 1970s-2006
80 boxes (120 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 560

As a student at the University of Massachusetts in the late 1960s, Ken Mosakowski first became a political activist when he protested the Vietnam War. Seeking an outlet to spread his message of peace and justice, he reached out to the student radio station WMUA, and started a weekly talk show Focus. For 38 years Mosakowski hosted the radio program every Sunday afternoon discussing topics of both local and national significance. Deeply involved in Amherst politics, he ran for the Amherst Select Board and lost; the loss, however, did not diminish his passion for serving the town and community he loved. Vocal on many issues, Mosakowski was known for being an activist in electoral politics and more recently an advocate for the homeless in Amherst, urging the creation of the Emergency Homelessness Task Force created in April 2006.

The Ken Mosakowski Papers document more than thirty years of his political activism. Saving everything from flyers and newspaper clippings to campaign buttons and posters, the collection documents a wide array of local and national issues. More importanly, it sheds light on issues of personal importance to Mosakowski, and as such chronicles his contributions as a lifelong activist.

Subjects
  • Activists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Political activists--Massachusetts
  • Social action--Massachusetts--History
Contributors
  • Mosakowski, Ken
Restrictions: The Mosakowski collection has temporarily been moved offsite; it is closed to research. Contact SCUA for more information.

Nguyen, Lucy Hong Nhiem, 1939-

Lucy Nguyen Papers, 1983-2001
2 boxes (0.75 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 026

A scholar of Francophone literature in Asia and Director of the United Asia Learning Resource Center, Lucy Nguyen Hong Nhiem was born in Kontum, Vietnam, in 1939. A graduate of the University of Saigon and teacher of French, she fled Saigon in 1975 just three days before its fall. From a refugee camp in Arkansas, she traveled through Connecticut and then to Springfield, Mass., before arriving at UMass in 1976 to resume her studies. After completing her MA (1978) and PhD (1982), she held positions at Smith, Amherst, and Mount Holyoke Colleges before beginning her tenure at UMass in 1984. An Adjunct Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures, she also served as Academic Advisor to the Bilingual Collegiate Program and Vice-Chair of the Governor’s Advisory Council on Refugees and Immigrants.

Nguyen’s papers are a small but critical collection of materials on Southeast Asian Refugees. Included among the papers are materials relating to the resettlement of Southeast Asian refugees, materials relating to the Governor’s Advisory Council on Refugees and Immigrants (1983), and a paper on the status of refugees in Massachusetts in 1987, along with unpublished writings, professional correspondence, and a handful of notes from a search committee.

Subjects
  • Refugees--Vietnam
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Bilingual Collegiate Program
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Program in Asian Languages and Literatures
  • Vietnamese--Massachusetts
Contributors
  • Nguyen, Lucy Hong Nhiem, 1939-
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