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Dartmouth Monthly Meeting of Friends (Wilburite: 1845-1944)

Dartmouth Monthly Meeting of Friends (Wilburite) Records

1845-1990
2 boxes, 12 vols. 1.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 W553 D378
Depiction of North Dartmouth Meeting House, 1981
North Dartmouth Meeting House, 1981

Separating from the main body of the Dartmouth Monthly Meeting in 1845, the Dartmouth Monthly Meeting became one the more successful Wilburite meetings, strengthened by the absorption of smaller peers including Westport (1850), New Bedford (1865), and Berwick (1881). In 1944, just prior to the New England Friends’ reunification, Dartmouth Monthly changed its name to North Dartmouth Monthly to distinguish itself from the Dartmouth Monthly Meeting situated in South Dartmouth.

The relatively rich documentation for Dartmouth Monthly Meeting (Wilburite) begins with the meeting’s establishment in the separation of 1845 and continues through reunification as the North Dartmouth Monthly Meeting. This collection includes continuous minutes from 1845 through 1989 (including the men’s and women’s minutes), with less thorough records from the Treasurer and, for a brief period only, for the Ministers and Elders. The vital records are restricted to a single volume of certificates of removal.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends, April 2017
Subjects
Dartmouth (Mass.)--Religious life and customs
Quakers--Massachusetts--Dartmouth
Society of Friends--Massachusetts
Wilburites
Contributors
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Types of material
Deeds
Minutes (Administrative records)
Dover Friends Meeting

Dover Friends Meeting Records

1678-2007
23 vols., 2 boxes 6 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 D684

The Friends Meeting at Dover, New Hampshire, is one of the oldest in British North America, with worship held there as early as 1662 when three Quaker women missionaries arrived on Dover Neck. Originally called Piscataqua, the meeting emerged as Dover Monthly Meeting by the latter decades of the seventeenth century and became the hub of a thriving Quaker community and the font from which several other New Hampshire meetings derived. In addition to overseeing a number of worship groups and preparatory meetings, Dover became the mother of monthlies and Berwick and Sandwich, which were set off in 1802, and Gonic in 1981.

The records of Dover Monthly Meeting offer extensive documentation of one of the oldest Quaker meetings in northern New England. Although most of the earliest records have not survived, the collection includes a nearly unbroken set of minutes from the turn of the eighteen century to 1981; extensive records of births, deaths, and marriages; spotty records for Ministry and Oversight and finance, and an array of recent newsletters. Minutes for the Women’s Meeting for the years 1783-1814 are not present and presumed lost.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting
Subjects
Dover (N.H.)--History
Quakers--New Hampshire
Society of Friends--New Hampshire
Types of material
Minutes (Administrative records)
Newsletters
Vital records (Document genre)
Dover Quarterly Meeting of Friends

Dover Quarterly Meeting of Friends Records

1728-1998
6 vols., 1 box 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 D6848

The Society of Friends’ Quarterly Meeting in Dover, N.H., was formed from Salem Quarterly Meeting in 1815. It has coordinaed four active monthly meetings: Concord (since 1967), Dover (1815), Gonic (1891), and Weare (1958), plus two that have been laid down: Sandwich (1815-1888) and Berwick (1815-1952).

In addition to a comprehensive set of minutes for Dover Quarterly since its establishment in 1815, the collection includes extensive records for Ministers and Elders and a small quantity of material on meeting history.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends, April 2017
Subjects
Concord (N.H.)--Religious life and customs
Quakers--New Hampshire
Society of Friends--New Hampshire
Contributors
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Types of material
Minutes (Administrative records)
Dudley, Joseph

Joseph Dudley Memoir and Diary

1866-1893
1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 650 bd

Born in Cheshire, Conn., in 1822, Joseph Dudley learned “the marble business” from his father Elias, who had in turn been trained by David Ritter of New Haven. A staunch Methodist swept up in the religious ferment of the Second Great Awakening, Dudley joined his father’s business as a stonecutter in about 1845 and notes that he was among the first to letter tombstones in the rural Ever Green Cemetery in Woodstock, Conn., when it opened in 1848. He later worked in Meriden, Conn.

By generations, this volume has served as an account book, diary and memorandum book, memoir, geneaological record, and scrapbook, with each layer accumulated over all previous. Dudley’s memoir (beginning p. 78) includes a discussion of his upbringing in Cheshire, the tumultuous religious revivals during the 1840s and his reception into the Methodist Church and the Millerites, and much on his introduction to the marble business and work as a stonecutter through about 1853. The diary somewhat erratically covers the years 1873-1893.

Subjects
Gravestones--Connecticut
Marble industry and trade--Connecticut
Millerite movement
Stonecutters
Contributors
Association for Gravestone Studies
Dudley, Joseph
Types of material
Diaries
Memoirs
Durham Friends Meeting

Durham Friends Meeting Records

1967-2015
7 vols., 2 boxes 2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 D874
Depiction of Durham Friends Meetinghouse
Durham Friends Meetinghouse

Durham Friends Meeting was set off as a monthly meeting under Salem Quarter in 1790, and was transferred to Falmouth Quarter in 1794. Leeds Monthly was set off from Durham in 1813, and Durham over saw a preparative meeting in the adjoining town of Lewiston until it, too, was set off in 1980.

The records of Durham Monthly Meeting consist of minutes of the meeting for business since 1987 and newsletters from 1967 to the present. Older records for the meeting are held at the Maine Historical Society

Gift of NEYM and Durham Friends Meeting
Subjects
Durham (N.H.)--Religious life and customs
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Quakers--Maine
Society of Friends--Maine
Contributors
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Types of material
Minutes (Administrative records)
Newsletters
Enfield (Mass.)

Enfield (Mass.) Collection

1800-1939
8 boxes 4 linear feet
Call no.: MS 010
Depiction of Birdseye view of Enfield, ca.1915
Birdseye view of Enfield, ca.1915

Situated at the confluence of the east and west branches of the Swift River in western Massachusetts, Enfield was the largest and southernmost of the four towns inundated in 1939 to create the Quabbin Reservoir. Incorporated as a town in 1816, Enfield was relatively prosperous in the nineteenth century on an economy based on agriculture and small-scale manufacturing, reaching a population of just over 1,000 by 1837. After thirty years of seeking a suitably large and reliable water supply for Boston, the state designated the Swift River Valley as the site for a new reservoir and with its population relocated, Enfield was officially disincorporated on April 28, 1938.

The records of the town of Enfield, Mass., document nearly the entire history of the largest of four towns inundated to create the Quabbin Reservoir. The core of the collection consists of records of town meetings and of the activities of the town Selectmen, 1804-1938, but there are substantial records for the Enfield Congregational Church. The School Committee, Overseers of the Poor, the town Library Association, and groups such as the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Bethel Masonic Lodge.

Subjects
Enfield (Mass.)--History
Enfield (Mass.)--Politics and government
Enfield (Mass.)--Religious life and customs
Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Women--Societies and clubs
Contributors
Daughters of the American Revolution. Captain Joseph Hooker Chapter (Enfield, Mass.)
Enfield (Mass. : Town)
Enfield (Mass. : Town). Overseers of the Poor
Enfield (Mass. : Town). Prudential Committee
Enfield (Mass. : Town). School Committee
Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.)
Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.). Women's Auxiliary
Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.). Women's Missionary Society
Types of material
Account books
Church records
Photographs
Sermons
Falmouth Quarterly Meeting of Friends

Falmouth Quarterly Meeting Records

1965-1996
3 vols. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 F3568

Part of the Society of Friends’ New England Yearly Meeting, Falmouth Quarterly Meeting was set off from Salem Quarter in 1794 and has subsequently given rise to quarterlies in Vassalboro (1813) and Parsonsfield (1888-1938).

With the majority of records for Falmouth Quarterly Meeting housed at the Maine Historical Society, SCUA maintains records that include only the minutes from 1988 to 1996, and records of Ministry and Counsel, 1965-1988, with a small gap near that end.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends, April 2017
Subjects
New Hampshire--Religious life and customs
Quakers--New Hampshire
Society of Friends--New Hampshire
Contributors
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Types of material
Minutes (Administrative records)
Farmington Monthly Meeting of Friends

Farmington Monthly Meeting Records

1984-2012
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 F376

After eight years as a Quaker worship group, Farmington Monthly Meeting was set off from Pondtown in 1991, becoming one of the newest members of Vassalboro Quarterly Meeting. Worship at Farmington is unprogammed.

Particularly for the early years, minutes for the Farmington Monthly Meeting were recorded (or preserved) somewhat irregularly, though continuously from 1984 to 2012. The collection also contains a set of state of the society reports. information on membership, and memorials.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends, April 2017
Subjects
Farmington (Me.)--Religious life and customs
Quakers--Maine
Society of Friends--Maine
Contributors
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Types of material
Minutes (Administrative records)
Flint and Lawrence Family

Flint and Lawrence Family Papers

1642-1798
2 boxes 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 273

Personal, financial and legal papers of Flint and Lawrence families of Lincoln, Massachusetts including wills, estate inventories, indenture documents, receipts of payment for slaves and education, correspondence; and records of town and church meetings, town petitions and receipts relating to the construction of the meeting house. Papers of Reverend William Lawrence include letter of acceptance of Lincoln, Massachusetts ministry, record of salary, a sermon and daybook. Personal papers of loyalist Dr. Joseph Adams, who fled to England in 1777, contain letters documenting conditions in England in the late 1700s and the legal and personal problems experienced by emigres and their families in the years following the Revolutionary War.

Subjects
American loyalists--Great Britain
American loyalists--Massachusetts
Church buildings--Massachusetts--Lincoln--Costs
England--Emigration and immigration--18th century
Flint family
Immigrants--England--17th century
Land tenure--Massachusetts--Lincoln
Landowners--Massachusetts--Lincoln
Lawrence family
Lincoln (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century
Lincoln (Mass.)--History
Lincoln (Mass.)--Social conditions--18th century
Massachusetts--Emigration and immigation--18th century
Slaves--Prices--Massachusetts--Lincoln
Contributors
Adams, Joseph, 1749-1803
Flint, Edward, 1685-1754
Flint, Ephraim, b. 1714
Flint, Love Adams, d. 1772
Flint, Thomas, d. 1653
Lawrence, William, 1723-1780
Types of material
Accounts
Genealogies
Indentures
Inventories of decedents estates
Wills
Fowler, Robert

Robert Fowler Diary

1831-1854
1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 174 bd

A native of Salisbury, Massachusetts, Robert Fowler (b.1805) was a prosperous shipbuilder and merchant with a trade extending from Nova Scotia to the Gulf South. He and his wife Susan Edwards, whom he married in 1830, had at least four children.

Kept by Robert Fowler between 1831 and 1854, the volume includes both diary entries (primarily 1841-1846) and accounts. With occasional commentary on local political matters, commerce, weather, and family matters, the diary is largely a record of Fowler’s spiritual concerns and his wrestling with doctrinal matters and the relationship of religion and daily life. An ardent temperance man, he commented on religious topics ranging from the Millerite movement to the resurrection, salvation, and the duty of prayer.

Subjects
Fatherhood
Fitch, Charles, 1805-1844
Merchants--Massachusetts--Salisbury
Millerite movement
Religious life--Massachusetts--Salisbury
Salisbury (Mass.)--History
Second Advent
Temperance
Types of material
Account books
Diaries