Logo and link to University of Massachusetts Amherst

Special Collections and University Archives : University Libraries

Collecting area: Photographs Page 6 of 17
Freeman, William H.

William H. Freeman Collection

1937-1946
2 vols., 1 letter 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: PH 068
Depiction of William H. Freeman, ca.1940
William H. Freeman, ca.1940

Attached to the 20th Air Base Group in 1941, Athol-native Bill Freeman was a first-hand witness to the beginnings of the war in the Pacific. Enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1940, Freeman was stationed at Nichols Field in the Philippines when the Japanese invaded, and after taken as prisoner or war, he was forced on the Bataan Death March. Freeman died of malaria in Cabanatuan Prison Camp in July 1942.

The Freeman scrapbook and photograph album that Bill Freeman kept offer a visually-intensive perspective on the brief life of an American serviceman in the Second World War. Kept during and immediately after high school, the scrapbook includes notices of his musical performances and other activities; the extensive photograph album documents his service in the Army Air Corps from the start of deployment through his travels in Hawaii and Guam to the early months of his service in the Philippines. The collection also includes a letter written from the Philippines during the summer 1941.

Subjects
Guam--Photographs
Hawaii--Photographs
Philippines--Photographs
United States. Army. Air Corps
World War, 1939-1945
Types of material
Photographs
Garboden, Clif

Clif Garboden Collection

ca.1965-2011
72 boxes 12 linear feet
Call no.: PH 075
Depiction of Clif Garboden, ca.1968. Photo by Jeff Albertson
Clif Garboden, ca.1968. Photo by Jeff Albertson

A noted figure in the alternative press and a former president of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, Clif Garboden was a long-time editor and writer for the Boston Phoenix. Arriving as a student at Boston University in 1966, Garboden was drawn into a close-knit, creative community on the BU News staff that included Raymond Mungo, Peter Simon, and Joe Pilati, filling a versatile role that entailed work as writer, editor, and photographer. After graduating in 1970, Garboden moved immediately to the Phoenix where he applied his signature wit and occasional snark to a wide range of topics. Apart from a six year period when he worked for the Boston Globe, Garboden was an indispensable part of the Phoenix editorial team until he was laid off in cost cutting moves in 2009. After a lengthy struggle with cancer, Garboden died of pneumonia on Feb. 10, 2011. He is survived by his wife, Susannah (Price), and children Molly and Phil.

The Garbdoen collection consists of hundreds of photographic prints, including work for both the Boston University News and the Phoenix and many personal images of family and friends.

Gift of Susannah Garboden, April 2017
Subjects
Boston Phoenix
Boston University News
Types of material
Photographs
Geisler, Bruce

Bruce Geisler Collection

1969-1984
14 boxes 21 linear feet
Call no.: PH 049
Depiction of Renaissance Community, ca.1974
Renaissance Community, ca.1974

In the early 1970s, the documentary filmmaker Bruce Geisler dropped out of Pomona College one semester short of graduation, drove across country, and joined the Brotherhood of the Spirit commune, then the largest commune in the eastern United States. During his four years living with the Brotherhood, later renamed the Renaissance Community, Geisler learned the craft of filmmaking, before returning west to earn an MFA at the film school of the University of Southern California. Geisler has received a number of awards as a screenwriter and filmmaker including the Grand Prize for Best Screenplay from Worldfest Houston and the Dominique Dunne Memorial Prize for Filmmaking, and, in 2007, he released his feature-length documentary, Free Spirits, about the Brotherhood of the Spirit/Renaissance Community and its ill-fated founder, Michael Metelica Rapunzel. Geisler is currently a Senior Lecturer in the UMass Amherst Department of Communication.

Documenting everyday life in a Massachusetts commune and performances by the commune bands (Spirit in Flesh and Rapunzel), the Geisler collection was assembled in conjunction with the making of the film Free Spirits. In addition to many hours of both raw and edited film footage taken by members of the Brotherhood of the Brotherhood of the Spirit and Renaissance Community, the collection includes a rich assemblage of still photographs, ephemera, and newspaper clippings relating to the commune.

Subjects
Brotherhood of the Spirit (Commune)
Communal living--Massachusetts
Renaissance Community (Commune)
Contributors
Geisler, Bruce
Types of material
Photographs
Videotapes
German Military Personnel

German Military Personnel Photograph Collection

ca. 1930-1939
2 boxes 0.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 384

Photographs from the 1930s and 1940s featuring both major government officials such as Hitler, Goebbels, and Himmler, and lower ranking officials such as regional party leaders. Photographs of German soldiers with their various weapons, some possibly fighting, are also depicted. Includes film stills from the Allied invasion of Normandy and German Communist refugees in the Soviet Union.

Subjects
Germans--Photographs
Nazis--Photographs
World War, 1939-1945
Types of material
Photographs
Glow, Lewis L.

Lewis L. Glow Photograph Album

1936-1939
1 photograph album 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 050 G53
Depiction of Lewis L. Glow, May 1939
Lewis L. Glow, May 1939

Born in East Pepperell, Mass., on May 1, 1916, the son of Edward and Angela Glow, Lewis Lyman Glow studied chemistry at Massachusetts State College during the latter years of the Great Depression. Graduating with the class of 1939, Glow continued his studies at Norwich University before serving aboard the USS New Jersey during the Second World War and Korean conflict. Glow died in East Pepperell on Sept. 23, 1986.

A well-labeled, thorough, and thoroughly personal photograph album, this documents the four years spent at Mass. State College. In addition to numerous images of Glow’s classmates and friends, his rooms at the Colonial Inn, beer parties and student highjinks such as the annual rope pull and horticultural show, the album includes numerous images of the cattle barn fire of September 1937 and the extensive damage to the MSC campus and surrounding town from the Hurricane of 1938.

Subjects
Fires--Massachusetts--Amherst
Massachusetts State College--Students
New England Hurricane, 1938
Contributors
Glow, Lewis L.
Types of material
Photographs
Goldfarb, Theodore D., 1935-

Theodore D. Goldfarb Collection

1978 June-July
389 digital images 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: PH 071
Part of: Science for the People Collection
Depiction of Oil processing plant machinery, June 1978
Oil processing plant machinery, June 1978

An environmental chemist, Ted Goldfarb was a founder of the Science for the People chapter at SUNY Stony Brook and an organizer of the group’s second trip to the People’s Republic of China in June 1978. The twelve delegates from SftP went with the intention of studying the organization of science and technology in China with respect to how it met people’s needs, and they were toured through a succession of factories, production facilities, farms, schools, and institutes in Guangzhou, Shanghai, Changsha, and Beijing, among other locations.

The nearly 400 slides in this collection were taken by Ted Goldfarb (and handful by his colleague Judith Weinstein) when they were members of the second Science for the People delegation to the People’s Republic of China in June 1978. Reflecting their interests in science and technology, the slides document a succession of factories, production facilities, schools, and institutes they visited, but include shots of typical street scenes, markets, artisans and factory workers, and tourist sites such as the Great Wall, Ming Tombs, and Forbidden City. In addition to the images of China, a handful were taken during a stopover in Delhi and Agra, India, on the way back to the United States.

Subjects
Acrobats--China--Shanghai
China--Photographs
Cotton manufacture--China--Shanghai--Photographs
Factories--China--Photographs
Forbidden City (Beijing, China)--Photographs
Great Wall of China (China)--Photographs
India--Photographs
Ming Tombs (China)--Photographs
Science for the People
Textile factories--China--Shanghai--Photographs
Contributors
Weinstein, Judith
Types of material
Photographs
Graham, Julie

Julie Graham Papers

1918-2009
33 boxes 49.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 144

The economic geographer Julie Graham (1945-2010) and her colleague Katherine Gibson have been influential in envisioning alternatives to capitalist economics and economic development. After studying at Smith College (BA, 1965) and Clark University (PhD, 1984), Graham joined the faculty at UMass Amherst where she helped shape the new graduate program in geography. From early in her career, she worked so closely with her Australian colleague Gibson that they often published jointly under the pen name J.K. Gibson-Graham, and Graham developed close working relationships across several departments at UMass. A prolific author and inspiring mentor for students, Graham’s academic work drew upon an innovative mix of political economy, poststructuralist theory, feminism, and community-based research. Among her more significant publications are the now-classic The End of Capitalism (As We Knew It): A Feminist Critique of Political Economy (1996), on representations of capitalism and their political effect, A Postcapitalist Politics (2006), which explores alternatives to capitalism, and two edited volumes, Class and Its Others (2000) and Re/Presenting Class (2001). Graham died in Nashville on April 4, 2010.

The Graham Papers offer a detailed perspective on the radical geographer Julie Graham. The collections documents Graham’s life and career beginning in her undergraduate years and extending through her last research projects in community economies. Through correspondence and writings, photographs, and research — closely intertwined with her colleague Katherine Gibson — the collection gives shape of Graham’s radical challenge to human geography tinged with an optimistic economic and social possibility. The collection also includes letters, photographs, and genealogical matter relating to Graham’s family, extending back to the time of the First World War.

Subjects
Capitalism
Economic geography
Feminist economics
Marxian economics
Social classes
University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Geosciences
Women geographers
Contributors
Gibson, Katherine
Gibson-Graham, J. K
Graham, Julie
Greenwich (Mass.)

Greenwich (Mass.) Collection

1734-1940
3 folders (plus digital) 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 011

Granted in 1737 and incorporated in 1754, Greenwich, Mass., was the first town in the Swift River Valley settled by Europeans. Sitting astride the East and Middle branches of the Swift River and forming the eastern boundary of Hampshire County, Greenwich was primarily an agricultural town with light manufacturing and, beginning in the later nineteenth century, an active tourist trade. The town’s population peaked at over 1,100 early in the nineteenth century, declining slowly thereafter.

The records of Greenwich, Mass., offer a long perspective on the history of the region inundated to create the Quabbin Reservoir. The core of this collection consists of the records of town meetings and the Selectmen of Greenwich from the Proprietary period in the 1730s through disincorporation in 1938, but there is some documentation of the town’s Congregational Church, a local school, the library, and the Greenwich Improvement Society. This finding aid reflects both materials held by SCUA and materials digitized in partnership with the Swift River Valley Historical Society in New Salem, Mass.

Subjects
Congregational churches--Massachusetts--Greenwich--History
Education--Massachusetts--Greenwich--History
Fires--Massachusetts--Greenwich--Histor
Greenwich (Mass.)--History
Greenwich (Mass.)--Politics and government
Greenwich (Mass.)--Religious life and customs
Greenwich (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Libraries--Massachusetts--Greenwich
Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Contributors
Greenwich (Mass. : Town)
Greenwich (Mass. : Town). School Committee
Greenwich (Mass. : Town). Treasurer
Greenwich Improvement Society
Types of material
Account books
Church records
Photographs
Haigis, John W., 1881-1960

John W. Haigis Papers

1903-1974
12 boxes 6 linear feet
Call no.: MS 304

Western Massachusetts political leader, publisher, and banker (1881-1960), Trustee of the University of Massachusetts (1940-1956), and founder, editor and publisher of the Greenfield Recorder newspaper (1912-1928); political positions included State Representative (1909-1913), State Senator (1913-1915, 1923-1927), and State Treasurer (1929-1930); in 1934, was Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor, and in 1936, candidate for Governor.

The Haigis collection includes scrapbooks (1903-1936), chiefly of clippings, together with speeches (1936), posters, badges, campaign material, and photographs, mainly from Haigis’s unsuccessful campaigns for lieutenant governor (1934) and governor (1936); and tape of an interview (1974) with Leverett Saltonstall about Haigis, conducted by Craig Wallwork.

Subjects
Campaign speeches--Massachusetts
Legislators--Massachusetts--History--20th century
Massachusetts--Politics and government--1865-1950
Montague (Mass. : Town)--Politics and government--20th century
Political candidates--Massachusetts--History--20th century
Republican Party (Mass.)--History--20th century
Contributors
Haigis, John W., 1881-1960
Saltonstall, Leverett, 1892-
Wallwork, Craig
Types of material
Phonograph records
Photographs
Posters
Scrapbooks
Halley, Anne

Anne Halley Papers

1886-2004
12 boxes 8.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 628

Writer, editor, and educator, Anne Halley was born in Bremerhaven, Germany in 1928. A child during the Holocaust, she relocated with her family to Olean, New York during the late 1930s so that her father, who was Jewish, could resume his practice of medicine. Graduating from Wellesley and the University of Minnesota, Halley married a fellow writer and educator, Jules Chametzky, in 1958. Together they raised three sons in Amherst, Massachusetts where Chametzky was a professor of English at UMass and Halley taught and wrote. It was during the late 1960s through the 1970s that she produced the first two of her three published collections of poetry. The last was published in 2003 the year before she died from complications of multiple myeloma at the age of 75.

Drafts of published and unpublished short stories and poems comprise the bulk of this collection. Letters to and from Halley, in particular those that depict her education at Wellesley and her professional life during the 1960s-1980s, make up another significant portion of her papers. Publisher’s correspondence and a draft of Halley’s afterward document the Chametzkys effort to release a new edition of Mary Doyle Curran’s book, The Parish and the Hill, for which Halley and Chametzky oversaw the literary rights. Photographs of Halley’s childhood in Germany and New York as well as later photographs that illustrate the growth of her own family in Minnesota and Massachusetts offer a visual representation of her remarkable professional and pesonal life.

Subjects
Curran, Mary Doyle, 1917-1981
Jews--Germany--History--1933-1945
Poets, American--20th century
Women authors, American
Women poets, American
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Chametzky, Jules
Halley, Anne