Logo and link to University of Massachusetts Amherst
Special Collections and University Archives : University Libraries

Collecting area: Science & technology (Page 6 of 12)

Hutner, S. H. (Seymour Herbert), 1911-

S.H. Hutner Papers

1971-1997
6 boxes 9 linear feet
Call no.: MS 549

A pioneer in the chemistry of protists, Seymour H. Hunter (1911-2003) was among the founders of the Haskins Laboratories in 1935, helping to establish its programs in microbiology, genetics, and nutrition (now affiliated with Pace University). His diverse research interests centered on protist nutrition, and he is credited with significant advances in understanding the ecology of marine plankton and the development of culturing methods for algae and protists. Stemming from his work on nutrition in Euglena, he developed microbiological assays for the determination of vitamin B12 in human tissues, and other research was foundational for understanding of the role of chelation for metals in culture systems and clinical use. Sometimes called a “protozoology missionary,” Hutner was a founding member of the Society of Protozoologists And was noted for his ability to recruit and inspire students and colleagues.

The Hutner Papers contain a significant run of scientific correspondence concentrated in the 1970s and 1980s, relating to Hutner’s research, publications, and the Haskins Lab, along with a small amount of material relating to his position at Pace University and some personal correspondence.

Subjects

Haskins LaboratoriesPace UniversityProtozoans--FoodProtozoans--Physiology

Contributors

Hutner, S. H. (Seymour Herbert), 1911-
Inglis, David R.

David R. Inglis Papers

1929-2003 Bulk: 1946-1980
12 boxes 5.75 linear feet
Call no.: FS 033
Depiction of David R. Inglis at Argonne N.L., ca.1953
David R. Inglis at Argonne N.L., ca.1953

David R. Inglis enjoyed a distinguished career in nuclear physics that ranged from theoretical work on the structure of the nucleus in the 1930s to the development of the atomic bomb in the 1940s and work on renewable energy in the 1960s and 1970s. A Professor of Physics at UMass from 1969-1975, Inglis was a founding member of the Federation of American Scientists and from the mid-1940s on, he dedicated himself to informing public policy on the dangers of nuclear technologies.

The Inglis Papers offer a perspective on the life and career of a theoretical physicist who grew from an early involvement in the Manhattan Project to becoming a committed critic of nuclear weaponry and nuclear power. Although the collection is relatively sparse in unpublished scientific work, it includes valuable correspondence relating to Inglis’s efforts with the Federation of American Scientists and other organizations to influence public policy on issues relating to disarmament and nuclear power.

Subjects

Allegiance--United StatesArgonne National LaboratoriesCondon, Edward Uhler, 1902-1974Federation of American ScientistsLos Alamos National LaboratoryNuclear disarmamentNuclear energyNuclear warfareOppenheimer, J. Robert, 1904-1967Physics--MassachusettsUnited States--History--1945-1953United States--History--1953-1961University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of PhysicsUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Institute for Man and His EnvironmentWorld Association of World FederalistsWorld Federation of Scientific Workers

Contributors

Bohr, AageInglis, David Rittenhouse, 1905-Teller, Edward, 1908-2003Wigner, Eugene Paul, 1902-1995

Types of material

Laboratory notesOral historiesPhotographs
Irvine, William M.

William M. Irvine Papers

1969-2001
3 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 157
Depiction of Five College Radio Observatory
Five College Radio Observatory

Beginning with his dissertation in theoretical astrophysics “Local irregularities in a universe satisfying the cosmological principle” (Harvard, 1961), William M. Irvine enjoyed a distinguished career as an astronomer and a role as one of the primary figures in developing astronomy at the Five Colleges. Arriving at UMass in 1966, Irvine helped build the graduate program in astronomy and beginning in 1969, he was a motive force in establishing the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory. Focused largely on the chemistry of dense interstellar clouds and the physics and chemistry of comets, and with a broad interest in bioastronomy/astrobiology, Irvine has been a prolific contributor to his field, and has served as President of the Commission on Bioastronomy at the International Astronomical Union, Chair of the Division for Planetary Sciences at the American Astronomical Society, a Councillor of the International Society for the Study of the origin of Life, and a member of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The Irvine Papers offer a thorough record of the establishment of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory from 1969 through its dedication in Oct. 1976, along with insights into the growth of astronomy at UMass. Correspondence, memoranda, grant applications, and many dozens of photographs offer insight into the financial and political challenges of building the Observatory in the Quabbin watershed. The collection also includes notes for teaching Astronomy 101 and 223 (planetary science). His history of the department, Reflections on the Growth of Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts and the Five College Astronomy Department (2006), is filed with the Physics and Astronomy Department records. Irvine’s published works are listed in the Libraries’ ScholarWorks author gallery.

Subjects

Astronomy--Study and teachingFive College Radio Astronomy Observatory (New Salem, Mass.)University of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Astronomy

Contributors

Irvine, William M.

Types of material

Photographs
Kloetzel, John

John Kloetzel Papers

1973-2003
5 boxes 7.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 550

John Kloetzel began his academic career in 1967 with his Johns Hopkins dissertation on the fine structure of the larval salivary gland in a dipteran. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado, however, he began publishing on the structure of the ciliate cytoskeleton, working on Euplotes for much of his nearly forty year career at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. A past president of the International Society of Protistologists, Kloetzel has retired to Oregon.

The bulk of the Kloetzel Papers consists of TEM and SEM micrographs of protists, along with some correspondence, grant proposals, and manuscripts. Other Kloetzel material is located in the records of the International Society of Protistologists at the University of Maryland Baltimore County Library.

Gift f John Kloetzel, Dec. 2008

Subjects

CytoskeletonProtozoans--CompositionUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County--Faculty

Contributors

Kloetzel, John

Types of material

Scanning electron micrographsTransmission electron micrographs
Kramsh, Samuel

Samuel Kramsh List of Plants Found in Pennsylvania and North-Carolina : manuscript notebook

1787-1789
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 431

During the last quarter of the eighteenth century, Samuel Kramsh worked as a collector and supplier of native plants for horticulturists and botanists, including Humphry and Moses Marshall and Benjamin Smith Barton.

This manuscript includes an exhaustive record of plant species collected in Pennsylvania and North Carolina during the years 1787-1789.

Acquired, Jan. 1919

Subjects

Botany--North Carolina--18th centuryBotany--Pennsylvania--18th centuryMarshall, Humphry, 1722-1801Thurber, George, 1821-1890

Contributors

Kramsh, Samuel

Types of material

Field notes
Kugrens, Paul

Paul Kugrens Papers

1994-2006
4 boxes 1.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 629

A specialist in the cryptophycaea, Paul Kugrens was born in Latvia in 1942 and lived in Pegnitz, Germany, until he emigrated to the United States with his parents at the age of eight. After receiving bachelors and masters degrees in zoology at the University of Nebraska and a doctorate at Berkeley (1971), Kugrens joined the faculty at Colorado State, remaining there for thirty-seven years. His research centered on the cell biology and ultrastructure of the cryptophytes Chroomonas, Cryptomonas, and Rhodomonas, and microalgae such as Prymnesium and Cyanophora.

The Kugrens papers include extensive documentation of the research and professional activities of a phycologist, including correspondence, grants proposals, manuscripts, and field data, along with thousands of electronic micrographs.

Gift of Terry Kugrens, Aug. 2009

Subjects

AlgologistsColorado State University--FacultyCyanobacteria--Composition

Contributors

Kugrens, Paul

Types of material

Scanning electron micrographs
Lindsey, Joseph B.

Joseph B. Lindsey Papers

1891-1945
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 077
Depiction of Joseph B. Lindsey
Joseph B. Lindsey

The career of the agricultural chemist Joseph Bridego Lindsey was tied closely to his alma mater, the Massachusetts Agricultural College. A brilliant student, Lindsey earned his bachelor’s degree in 1883 after only three years of study and he launched his professional life at the College, working with his mentor Charles A. Goessmann at MAC and then for the L.B. Darling Fertilizer Company in Pawtucket, Mass. After enrolling at the prestigious Gottingen University and earning his degree in 1891 after only two years, Lindsey returned to Amherst to work at the College’s Experimental Station, where he helped initiate an extension program. Noted for promoting legislation in the state to support research and purity in animal feed, Lindsey rose to become head of the MAC Chemistry Department from 1911 until 1928 and oversaw the creation of the Goessmann Chemistry Laboratory in 1921. He retired from the College in 1932 and died in Amherst on October 27, 1939.

The Lindsey collection includes published articles and pamphlets as well as an analysis of the water in the campus pond from 1901, where Lindsey demonstrated that the water was unsafe for human consumption. There is also correspondence from Lindsey’s son about a memorial plaque and portrait of Lindsey, along with several photographs of the former chemist.

Subjects

University of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Chemistry
Livers, Susie D.

Susie D. Livers Papers

1903-1907
1 flat box 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 122

Susie D. Livers arrived at Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1903 as a member of one of the college’s first co-ed classes. After graduating in 1907, Livers worked at Ginn & Company Publishers in Boston and then as a Detail Officer at the State School for Girls in Lancaster, Massachusetts.

Included in the scrapbook are handwritten personal correspondence in the form of letters, postcards, holiday cards, and telegrams; unidentified photographs; MAC report cards dated 1904 and 1907; class papers and a class notebook; and programs and tickets for sporting events, weddings, and campus socials. In the back of the scrapbook are 35 herbarium samples which include dried plants with notations of plant names as well as dates and locations indicating where the plants were found.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students

Contributors

Livers, Susie D

Types of material

EphemeraHerbariaScrapbooks
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920

Benjamin Smith Lyman Papers

1831-1921
52 boxes 42 linear feet
Call no.: MS 190
Depiction of Benjamin Smith Lyman, 1902
Benjamin Smith Lyman, 1902

A native of Northampton, Massachusetts, Benjamin Smith Lyman was a prominent geologist and mining engineer. At the request of the Meiji government in Japan, Lyman helped introduce modern geological surveying and mining techniques during the 1870s and 1880s, and his papers from that period illuminate aspects of late nineteenth century Japan, New England, and Pennsylvania, as well as the fields of geology and mining exploration and engineering. From his earliest financial records kept as a student at Phillips Exeter Academy through the journal notations of his later days in Philadelphia, Lyman’s meticulous record-keeping provides much detail about his life and work. Correspondents include his classmate, Franklin B. Sanborn, a friend of the Concord Transcendentalists and an active social reformer, abolitionist, and editor.

The papers, 1848-1911, have been organized into nine series: correspondence, financial records, writings, survey notebooks, survey maps, photographs, student notes and notebooks, collections, and miscellaneous (total 25 linear feet). A separate Lyman collection includes over 2,000 books in Japanese and Chinese acquired by Lyman, and in Western languages pertaining to Asia.

Language(s): EnglishJapanese

Subjects

Geological surveys--AlabamaGeological surveys--IllinoisGeological surveys--India--PunjabGeological surveys--JapanGeological surveys--Japan--MapsGeological surveys--MarylandGeological surveys--Nova ScotiaGeological surveys--PennsylvaniaGeological surveys--Pennsylvania--MapsGeologists--United StatesGeology--Equipment and supplies--CatalogsGeology--Japan--History--19th centuryJapan--Description and travel--19th centuryJapan--MapsJapan--PhotographsJapan--Social life and customs--1868-1912Mining engineering--Equipment and supplies--CatalogsMining engineering--Japan--History--19th centuryMining engineers--United States

Contributors

Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917

Types of material

Account booksBook jacketsField notesLetterpress copybooksMapsNotebooksPhotographsScrapbooksTrade catalogs
Lynton, E. A. (Ernest Albert)

E. A. Lynton Papers

1951-1975
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 132

An authority in the field of low-temperature physics and superconductivity, Ernest A. Lynton was brought to UMass Amherst in 1973 to serve as the first Vice President for Academic Affairs and Commonwealth Professor of Physics. Lynton was charged with diversifying the student body and broadening the curriculum to emphasize social issues. Born in Berlin Germany in 1926, Lynton received a doctorate in physics from Yale in 1951. He served in his administrative post until 1980, when he took a position as Commonwealth Professor at UMass Boston.

Centered largely on Ernest Lynton’s teaching, the collection contains lecture notes and handouts for Physics courses (Physics 107, 171, Concepts in Physics, Thermodynamics, Statistical Physics), a copy of his dissertation Second Sound in He3-He 4 mixtures, and copies of his book on superconductivity in English, German, and French editions.

Subjects

Physics--Study and teachingUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics

Contributors

Lynton, E. A. (Ernest Albert)