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Lederer, Regina Berger, 1895-1988

Regina Lederer Oral History

1984
1 envelope 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 358 bd

Regina Berger Lederer was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1895 into the family of a successful manufacturing chemist. Her singing career was promising, but never fully realized. With the rise of the Nazi Party and increase in oppression of Jews, she and her husband escaped by leaving for Italy and the United States in 1939. Settling in New York, she worked as a skilled sweater repairer for many years. She died in Maryland in 1988, where she had gone to live near her son Paul.

Transcript of an oral history of Lederer.

Subjects
Jewish women--United States--Interviews
Jews, Austrian--United States--Interviews
Jews--Austria--History--20th century--Sources
Knit goods--Repairing--New York (State)--New York
Refugees, Jewish--United States--Interviews
Sweater industry--New York (State)--New York--Employees--Interviews
Contributors
Lederer, Regina Berger, 1895-1988
Types of material
Oral histories
Lipshires, Sidney

Sidney Lipshires Papers

1932-2012
7 boxes 3.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 730
Depiction of Sidney Lipshires
Sidney Lipshires

Born on April 15, 1919 in Baltimore, Maryland to David and Minnie Lipshires, Sidney was raised in Northampton, Massachusetts where his father owned two shoe stores, David Boot Shop and The Bootery. He attended the Massachusetts State College for one year before transferring to the University of Chicago and was awarded a BA in economics in 1940. His years at the University of Chicago were transformative, Lipshires became politically active there and joined the Communist Party in 1939. Following graduation in 1941, he married Shirley Dvorin, a student in early childhood education; together they had two sons, Ellis and Bernard. Lipshires returned to western Massachusetts with his young family in the early 1940s, working as a labor organizer. He served in the United States Army from 1943 to 1946 working as a clerk and interpreter with a medical battalion in France for over a year. Returning home, he ran for city alderman in Springfield on the Communist Party ticket in 1947. Lipshires married his second wife, Joann Breen Klein, in 1951 and on May 29, 1956, the same day his daughter Lisa was born, he was arrested under the Smith Act for his Communist Party activities. Before his case was brought to trial, the Smith Act was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. Disillusioned with the Communist Party, he severed his ties with it in 1957, but continued to remain active in organized labor for the rest of his life. Earning his masters in 1965 and Ph.D. in 1971, Lipshires taught history at Manchester Community College in Connecticut for thirty years. During that time he worked with other campus leaders to establish a statewide union for teachers and other community college professionals, an experience he wrote about in his book, Giving Them Hell: How a College Professor Organized and Led a Successful Statewide Union. Sidney Lipshires died on January 6, 2011 at the age of 91.

Ranging from an autobiographical account that outlines his development as an activist (prepared in anticipation of a trial for conspiracy charges under the Smith Act) to drafts and notes relating to his book Giving Them Hell, the Sidney Lipshires Papers offers an overview of his role in the Communist Party and as a labor organizer. The collection also contains his testimony in a 1955 public hearing before the Special Commission to Study and Investigate Communism and Subversive Activities, photographs, and biographical materials.

Subjects
Communism--United States--History
Communists--Massachusetts
Jews--Massachusetts--Northampton--History
Jews--Political activity--United States--History--20th century
Labor movement--United States--History--20th century
Labor unions--United States--Officials and employees--Biography
Contributors
Lipshires, David M
Lipshires, Joann B
Lipshires, Sidney
Types of material
Autobiographies
Photographs
Testimonies
Lipski family

Lipski Family Collection

1927-1990
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 357
Depiction of Stanley Lipski on the Finnish front, 1940
Stanley Lipski on the Finnish front, 1940

Antoni Lipski emigrated from Grodno, now Belarus, in 1907, and settled in the Oxbow neighborhood of Northampton, Mass. An employee of the Mount Tom Sulphite Pulp Company, he and his wife Marta had a family of twelve, ten of who survived to adulthood. Their oldest child Stanley Walter Lipski graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1935 and was killed in action aboard the USS Indianapolis in July 1945.

The slender record of two generations of a Polish immigrant family from Northampton, Mass., the Lipski collection includes two documents relating to Antoni Lipski and four photographs, two letters, and news clippings relating to his eldest son, Stanley Walter Lipski, a naval officer who was killed in action aboard the USS Indianapolis during the Second World War.

Gift of Anthony Lipski, Oct. 1991
Subjects
Polish Americans--Massachusetts
United States. Navy
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Lipski, Antoni, 1882-1953
Lipski, Stanley Walter, 1911-1945
Types of material
Photograph albums
Photographs
Macedonian Students

Macedonian Students' Scrapbook

1946
1 vol. 0.15 linear feet
Call no.: MS 262 bd
Depiction of Dancing the hora around a Red Cross flag, 1946
Dancing the hora around a Red Cross flag, 1946

The Red Cross played an important relief role in Yugoslavia, helping the still volatile region recover from the devastation of the Second World War.

The sketches and essays in this scrapbook, accompanied by a handful of photographs, were apparently made by grade school students in Skopje, Macedonia, just after the Second World War. The images depict the city, countryside, and people, with a handful of more abstract designs. Red Cross imagery is prominent throughout. Although the provenance of the album is uncertain, it seems possible that it was assembled to pay homage to the organization’s relief efforts.

Gift of Joel Halpern
Language(s): Macedonian
Subjects
Students--Macedonia
World War, 1939-1945--Macedonia
Types of material
Scrapbooks
Machmer, William L.

William L. Machmer Papers

1899-1953
18 boxes 9 linear feet
Call no.: RG 006/1 M33
Depiction of William L. Machmer
William L. Machmer

Enjoying one of the longest tenures of any administrator in the history of the University of Massachusetts, William Lawson Machmer served under five presidents across 42 years, helping to guide the university through an economic depression, two world wars, and three name changes. During his years as Dean, Machmer witnessed the growth of the university from fewer than 500 students to almost 3,800, and helped guide its transformation from a small agricultural college into Massachusetts State College (1931) and finally into the University of Massachusetts (1947).

Machmer’s papers chronicle the fitful development of the University of Massachusetts from the days of Kenyon Butterfield’s innovations of the 1920s through the time of the GI Bill. The collection is particularly strong in documenting the academic experience of students and the changes affecting the various departments and programs at the University, with particular depth for the period during and after the Second World War.

Connect to another siteView selected records on women's affairs at UMass, 1924-1951
Subjects
Agricultural education
Fort Devens (Mass.)
Massachusetts Agricultural College
Massachusetts State College
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Mathematics
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Baker, Hugh Potter, 1878-
Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935
Lewis, Edward M
Machmer, William L
Van Meter, Ralph Albert, 1893-
Types of material
Letters (Correspondence)
Student records
Maginnis, John J.

John J. Maginnis and Arthur Howard Military Government of Europe Collection

1944-1946
12 boxes 9.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 405

Papers of General John J. Maginnis and Colonel Arthur Howard, both of the MAC Class of 1918, from their experience as part of the American Military Government of Europe following World War II.

The Arthur Howard Papers (8 linear feet) deal with the restoration of food production in the war ravaged “breadbasket of South Germany,” Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, and the Wurttemberg Baden area. Col. Howard (at that time a Major) was a specialist in food and food processing, and his charge extended to the rehabilitation of supporting industries; he also made repairs of the Karlsruhe and Mannheim harbors.

The John J. Maginnis papers (1.5 linear feet) deal with the processes of government of European areas just delivered from German occupation, and of German areas newly occupied by Allied troops. General Maginnis (at that time a Major and then a Colonel) was an administrator successively in Normandy and Ardennes in France; Hainaut, Belgium; and Berlin.

Subjects
Military government--Germany
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Howard, Arthur
Maki, John M. (John McGilvrey), 1909-

John M. Maki Papers

1887-2005 Bulk: 1940-1990
14 boxes 21 linear feet
Call no.: FS 120
Depiction of Jack Maki, ca.1983
Jack Maki, ca.1983

Born to Japanese parents in Tacoma, Washington, in 1909, John Maki was adopted as an infant by a white couple and raised on their farm. After receiving both his bachelors (1932) and masters (1936) in English literature at the University of Washington, Maki was persuaded to switch fields to the study of Japan. Following a fellowship from the Japanese government to study in Tokyo in the late 1930s, the war interrupted his plans. After being ordered to internment, he served with the Foreign Broadcast Intelligence Service of the Federal Communications Commission and in psychological warfare planning with the Office of War Information, and after the war, he took a position with the occupation authority, assisting in the drafting of the Japanese Constitution. Returning stateside, he resumed his academic career, earning his doctorate in political science at Harvard in 1948. After eighteen years on the faculty at the University of Washington, Maki moved to UMass in 1966, where he served as chair of the Asian Studies Program and in administrative posts, including as vice dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. In recognition of his efforts to promote relations between the U.S. and Japan, he was awarded the Third Class Order of the Sacred Treasure by the emperor of Japan in 1983. Although he retired from the faculty in 1980, Maki remained active as a scholar until the time of his death in Amherst in December 2006.

The Maki Papers reflect a long career in the study of contemporary Japanese politics and culture. Beginning with his earliest academic work on Japan in the 1930s, the collection documents the range of Maki’s interests, from the origins of Japanese militarism and nationalism to the development of the post-war Constitution and his later studies of William Smith Clark and the long history of Japanese-American relations. The collection includes valuable documents from the early period of the Allied Occupation, including the extensive correspondence with his wife Mary (1946).

Subjects
Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
Constitutional law--Japan
Japan--History--Allied occupation, 1945-1952
Japan--Politics and government--20th century
University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Political Science
Contributors
Maki, John M. (John McGilvrey), 1909-
Manchester, William Raymond, 1922-

William Manchester Papers

1941-1988
4 boxes 1.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 433

The writer William Manchester interrupted his undergraduate education at Massachusetts State College to serve in the Marine Corps during the Second World War. After training in the V-12 Program at Dartmouth College and at Parris Island, and then washing out in Officers Candidate School, he was assigned to the 29th Marine Regiment. Sent to the South Pacific in July 1944, the 29th Marines became part of the landing force on Okinawa on April 1, 1945. After helping to clear the northern part of the island, they turned to the difficult operations on the Shuri line, including the capture of Sugar Loaf Hill, but on June 5, 1945, Manchester was severely wounded and spent the remainder of the war in hospital. He completed his degree at Mass. State after returning to civilian life, and went on to a graduate degree at the University of Missouri. During his years as a journalist, historian, and professor of Wesleyan University, he published 18 books ranging from biographies of H.L. Mencken, John F. Kennedy, and Winston Churchill, to a memoir of his experiences as a Marine. A recipient of the National Humanities Medal, Manchester died in 2004 at the age of 82.

This small, but noteworthy collection consists almost exclusively of letters written by William Manchester to his mother during his service with the 29th Marines in World War II.

Subjects
Massachusetts State College--Students
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Manchester, William Raymond, 1922-
Types of material
Letters (Correspondence)
Meier, August, 1923-2003

August Meier Collection

1837-1984
3 boxes, 329 titles 34.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 844
Depiction of

A pioneer in African American history, August Meier was a model of an engaged academic, a prolific writer, active participant in the civil rights struggle, and staunch member of the NAACP, SNCC, and CORE. While pursuing graduate work at Columbia under Henry Steele Commager, Meier taught at a succession of Historical Black Colleges, including Tougaloo (1945-1949), Fisk (1953-1956), and Morgan State (1957-1964). His dissertation, completed in 1957, became the first of eleven books he wrote or edited, Negro Thought in America, 1880-1915 (1963), with much of later work conducted in collaboration with Elliott Rudwick and John Bracey. Meier joined the faculty at Kent State University in 1967 and remained there until his retirement in 1993. His much-anticipated monograph on the history of the NAACP had not been completed at the time of death in 2003.

Organized in two discrete parts, the Meier collection bookends a long career in the study of African American history. The first part of the collection is centered on Meier’s association with the Pioneer Youth summer camp in Rifton, N.Y., and his growing consciousness of the fundamental problems of race and class in American society, with some materials from his wartime years as an undergraduate at Oberlin College. The second part of the collection includes books collected by Meier during his academic career, mostly on African American history and culture. Titles range from works on the Civil Rights movement to literature and poetry of the late nineteenth century and Harlem Renaissance, works on slavery and antislavery, race theory, the South, and African American education and religion.

Subjects
African Americans--History
Antislavery movements
Camps--New York (State)
Civil rights movements
Communists--United States
Depressions--1929
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt),1868-1963
Oberlin College--Students
Pioneer Youth of America
Race relations
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Braunthal, Gerard, 1923-
Types of material
Newsletters
Songbooks
Millman, George H. (George Harold), 1919-

George Millman Papers

1944-1945
3 boxes 3 linear feet
Call no.: MS 728
Depiction of George and Lillian Millman
George and Lillian Millman

Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1919, George Millman attended Massachusetts State College briefly, but was forced to drop out after his freshman year due to financial hardship. After attending a three-month intensive training course, Millman was employed by the War Department in 1941 as a civilian inspector in the munitions plant in New London, Connecticut. In the months that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor, he felt it was his patriotic duty to join the armed forces and enlisted on May 28, 1942. Called to active duty six months later, Millman was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps on April 29, 1943. Already dating his soon-to-be-bride Lillian, the couple decided to marry immediately before he could be sent overseas. Assigned to a class on the theoretical aspects of radar at Harvard University, Millman was ordered to report to the Army Air Force Technical School in Boca Raton in late 1943. On June 24, 1944, he received secret travel orders assigning him to the 5th Air Force Service Command in Brisbane, Australia. There he began training fighter pilots on the use and operation of the newly developed airborne radar, AN/APS-4. Throughout his tour in the Pacific, which ended in early 1946, Millman traveled throughout the region, including time in Australia, the Netherlands East Indies, the Netherlands New Guinea, and the Philippines.

Containing almost 400 letters written to his wife Lillian during World War II, Millman’s papers detail nearly every aspect of life in the service during wartime. From chronicling extreme environmental conditions to his feelings of frustration while awaiting assignment, Millman’s letters offer a personal perspective of the impact of war on an individual and his loved ones. While his letters carefully avoid any details about his work that could have been censored, they capture in extraordinary detail the day-to-day life of a serviceman in the Pacific theater during WWII. Millman published his letters to his wife in 2011 in a book entitled Letters to Lillian.

Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Millman, George H. (George Harold), 1919-
Types of material
Letters (Correspondence)