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Fall River Loom Fixers’ Association

Fall River Loom-Fixers' Association Records

1895-1917
2 boxes 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 003

Members of the Fall River Loom Fixers Association included some of the most skilled workers in the New England textile industry. The association, on behalf of its members, sought to improve poor working conditions, to provide assistance for members affected by pay reductions or layoffs, and to intervene in conflicts between members and management. The union also served a social function, organizing parades, social gatherings, and excursions. In the 1910s it became affiliated with the United Textile Workers for America.

Records of the Loom Fixers Association include executive committee minutes (1900-1901 and 1911-1917), a treasurer’s book (1901-1905), and six dues books (1895-1907).

Subjects
Labor unions--Massachusetts
Textile workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts
Fitzpatrick, Ken

Ken Fitzpatrick Collection

ca.1980-2010
3 boxes 3 linear feet
Call no.: MS 773

Ken Fitzpatrick was long time organizer and official of the American Postal Workers Union, serving as President of Local 497 and Secretary and Treasurer for the American Postal Workers Union of Massachusetts before his retirement in about 2010.

The Fitzpatrick collection includes a selection of posters, hats, and ephemera related to the APWU.

Gift of Ken Fitzpatrick, Mar. 2013
Subjects
American Postal Workers Union
Labor unions--Massachusetts
Postal workers--Labor unions
Types of material
Ephemera
Realia
Friedman, Alice H. (Alice Howell)

Alice Howell Friedman Papers

ca. 1967-2014
1 box 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 169

Alice Howell Friedman, a professor in the School of Nursing from 1967 until her retirement in 1984, was a strong advocate for the professionalization of nursing, and an activist for unionization and equitable compensation for nurses. Friedman arrived during a period of rapid growth for the School of Nursing and her push to broaden the educational content of nursing students played a significant role in the further growth and success of the program. This approach is exemplified in the International Experiences program she founded. After retirement, Friedman remained very involved in the field of nursing and, among many significant activities, focused on the history of nursing, becoming a tireless lay-archivist, forming the Nursing Archives at Boston University and developing the School of Nursing collections at UMass Amherst.

The Alice Howell Friedman papers document Friedman’s time as an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at UMass and her work as a labor activist, including lecture notes, publications, correspondence, clippings, and biographical materials.

Subjects
University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Nursing
Friedman, Harvey

Harvey Friedman Papers

1922-1992
3.75 linear feet
Call no.: FS 004

Born in June 1922, Harvey Friedman attended Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, and enrolled in the Boston University School of Law in 1941. After serving as a non-commissioned officer with an Army medical unit in France from 1942-1946, Friedman returned home to Massachusetts and became a member of the bar in 1948. For the next fifteen years, he was the Assistant New England Director for the Amalgamated Clothing Worker Union, AFL-CIO. After refusing the position several times, Friedman accepted an offer from the University of Massachusetts Amherst to become Assistant Director of the Labor Relations and Research Center in 1965, earning promotion to Director in 1970. During his tenure at UMass, Friedman taught classes in Political Science, Legal Studies, Government, and Education. He retired from UMass in 1990 and passed away in 1992.

The Friedman Papers contain correspondence, newsclippings, and course materials dating from Friedman’s time at UMass. Also included are materials related to unions with which Friedman worked and documentation of his relationship with the American Arbitration Association.

Subjects
University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Labor Relations and Research Center
Contributors
Friedman, Harvey
Granite Cutters International Association of America

Granite Cutters' International Association of America Records

1877-1978
27 boxes 19.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 004

Organized in Rockland, Maine in March 1877 as the Granite Cutters’ National Union, the association later adopted its present name in 1905. The trade union clearly had a strong sense of their identity and purpose claiming for itself “the jurisdiction over cutting, carving, dressing, sawing, and setting all granite and hard stone on which granite cutters tools are used,” and further claiming that “no other other trade, craft or calling has any right or jurisdiction over” the these activities.

Records include National Union Committee minutebooks from 1886-1954, monthly circulars, membership registers, and 100 years of the union’s official publication, the Granite Cutters’ Journal.

Subjects
Labor unions--New England
Stone-cutters--Labor unions
Contributors
Granite Cutters' International Association of America
Types of material
Minute books
Granite Cutters International Association of America. Tool Sharpeners Local 1

GCIAA Tool Sharpeners Local 1 Records

1898-1941
0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 005

The Tool Sharpeners Local 1 of Granite Cutters International Association of America was established in Quincy, Mass., in 1896. The local represented the interests of one of the skilled trades within the Grant Cutters, which claimed for itself “jurisdiction over cutting, carving, dressing, sawing, and setting all granite and hard stone on which granite cutters tools are used,” and further claiming that “no other other trade, craft or calling has any right or jurisdiction over” the these activities.

The minutebooks contain records of membership meetings of the Toolsharpeners Local 1 of the Granite Cutters’ International Association. Spartan documents, these include notice of the election of officers, summaries of business, and occasional brief notes on grievances, communications with other locals, and new and departing members.

Subjects
Labor unions--Massachusetts
Stone-cutters--Labor unions--Massachusetts
Contributors
Granite Cutters' International Association of America
Types of material
Minute books
Graphic Communications International Union. Local 48B

GCIU Local 48B Records

1952-1985
3 boxes 1.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 059

Local of the Graphic Communications International Union that represented over 1000 bindery workers in the Holyoke, Massachusetts area. Records include detailed minutes, shop reports, committee reports, reports of delegates sent to the Holyoke Central Labor Union and national conventions, copies of agreements, notes on contract negotiations, copies of three newsletters, and subject files that document activities as well as the emergence of factionalism within the union.

Subjects
Carrying on
Collective bargaining--Paper industry--Massachusetts --Holyoke--History--Sources
Holyoke (Mass.)--Economic conditions--Sources
Labor unions--Massachusetts--Holyoke
National Blank Book Co.--History
Old unionist
Paper industry workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts--Holyoke
Contributors
Graphic Arts International Union. Local 48B
International Brotherhood of Bookbinders. Local 48
Types of material
Newsletters
Greensboro Justice Fund

Greensboro Justice Fund Records

1966-2009 Bulk: 1979-2002
22 boxes 33 linear feet
Call no.: MS 697

Five organizers affiliated with the Communist Workers Party were murdered by Klansmen and Nazis in Greenboro, N.C., on Nov. 3, 1979. Although an all white jury acquitted the defendants of murder and a second jury acquitted them of civil rights violations, a civil suit filed by survivors of the assault resulted in eight Klansmen being found liable for wrongful death in 1985. First conceived in 1980 as an organization to support the survivors of the assault, the Greensboro Justice Fund grew to support grassroots organizations and activists working for civil rights, social change, and radical democracy in the South.

The records of the Greensboro Justice Fund offer dramatic testimony to the impact of the Greensboro Massacre of 1979, and the manner in which a community of survivors and supporters cooperated to establish an organization that supplied grants to support grassroots social justice initiatives throughout the South.

Subjects
Communists--United States
Greensboro (N.C.)--History
Ku Klux Klan
Neo-Nazis
Racism
Contributors
Greensboro Civil Rights Fund
Nathan, Marty
Nathan, Michael
Types of material
Newsclippings
Photographs
Hill, Aurin F.

Aurin F. Hill Papers

1885-1929
8 boxes 6 linear feet
Call no.: MS 579
Depiction of Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,<br />ca.1928
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,
ca.1928

The self-styled “insane architect” Aurin F. Hill (b. 1853) was a free thinking carpenter and architect in Boston who waged a concerted campaign for his vision of social reform at the turn of the twentieth century. A Spiritualist, social radical, and union man, Hill carried the torch for issues ranging from the nationalization of railroads and corporations to civil rights and women’s rights, and joined in opposition to vaccination, Comstockery and censorship, capital punishment, and lynching. A writing medium, married to the Spiritual evangelist Izetta Sears-Hill, he became President of the National Spiritual Alliance in 1915, a Spiritualist organization based in Lake Pleasant, Mass.

Esoteric, rambling, and often difficult to follow, the Hill papers provide profound insight into the eclectic mind of an important Boston Spiritualist and labor activist at the turn of the twentieth century. Whether written as a diary or scattered notes, a scrapbook, essays, or letters to the editor, Hill’s writings cover a wide range of topics, from spirit influence to labor law, from his confinements for insanity to police strikes, hypnotism, reincarnation, and housing. More than just a reflection of one man’s psychology, the collection reveals much about broader social attitudes toward gender and race, sexuality, urban life, politics, and religion, and the collection is a particularly important resource for the history of the American Spiritualist movement between 1890 and 1920.

Subjects
Architects--Massachusetts--Boston
Boston (Mass.)--History
Carpenters--Labor unions
Hypnotism
Labor unions--Massachusetts
Lake Pleasant (Mass.)--History
Mediums--Massachusetts
Montague (Mass.)--History
National Spiritual Alliance
Spiritualism
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
Contributors
Hill, Aurin F.
Sears-Hill, Izetta B.
Types of material
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Independent Condenser Workers Union. Local 200

Independent Condenser Workers Union Local 2 Records

1946-1973
4 boxes 2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 315

Local 2 of the Independent Condenser Workers Union represented employees of the Sprague Electric Company in North Adams, Massachusetts. Beginning in the 1930s, Sprague was one of the largest employers in the Berkshires. Employing 4,000 workers, Sprague provided one-third of the area’s jobs, many of them held by women. By the 1960s, however, Sprague began increasing layoffs, and in 1985 the company moved its world headquarters out of North Adams, closing all but two small facilities.

Records of Local 2 include by-laws, constitutions, correspondence, company publications, and minutes of meetings between management and union representatives.

Subjects
Electricians--Labor unions
Labor unions--Massachusetts
Sprague Electric Company