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Hawks, Alice Totman

Alice Totman Hawks Collection

1934-1978
4 boxes 5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 731
Depiction of

Born on January 29, 1908 in Conway, Massachusetts, Alice Totman spent her early years on her father’s family farm, Page Place, before he was forced to sell it due to a labor scarcity in 1916 and moved the family to Greenfield. She graduated from Greenfield High School in 1927 and enrolled at Massachusetts School of Art in Boston. She studied there for a year and a half before marrying Hart Mowry Hawks on June 16, 1929. The couple settled in Bellows Fall, Vermont where Mowry was recently assigned a permanent post with the Boston and Maine Railroad. Tragically, over the next fifteen years, Alice experienced seven pregnancies, only one of which resulted in a healthy child, Gertrude Ann, born in 1932. Alice’s interest in her family can be traced back to the earliest days of her marriage, during which time she worked on genealogies for both the Totman and Hawks families. Eager to share the knowledge she acquired and assembled, she often found ways to update her relatives, most notably in a family newsletter called Tot-Kin that she edited and published between the years 1935-1945.

Alice Totman Hawks’s collection consists of her extensive genealogical notes and writings, including a run of Tot-Kin, correspondence and some of Alice’s sketches.

Subjects
Hawks family
Massachusetts--Genealogy
Totman family
Contributors
Hawks, Alice Totman
Types of material
Genealogies
Letters (Correspondence)
Howe Family

Howe Family Papers

1730-1955
7 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 019

Personal, business, and legal papers of the Howe family of Enfield and Dana, Massachusetts, including correspondence between family members, genealogies, account books and printed materials. Account books record transactions of various family members whose occupations included general storekeeper, minister, printer, postmaster, telephone exchange and gas-station owner, and document the transactions of community businesses and individuals, some of whom were women involved in the beginnings of the local palm leaf hat and mat industry.

Subjects
Bookkeeping--History--Sources
Enfield (Mass.)--Biography
Enfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
Enfield (Mass.)--History
Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Howe family--Genealogy
Moneylenders--Massachusetts--Enfield--History
Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
Swift River Valley (Mass.)--History
Swift River Valley (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Contributors
Howe, Donald W. (Donald Wiliam), 1982-1977
Howe, Edwin H., 1859-1943
Howe, Henry Clay Milton, b. 1823
Howe, John M.
Howe, John, 1783-1845
Howe, Theodocia Johnson, 1824-1898
Types of material
Account books
Business records
Deeds
Genealogies
Scrapbooks
Wills
Hudson Family

Hudson family Papers

1780-1955 Bulk: 1825-1848
6 boxes 3 linear feet
Call no.: MS 332
Depiction of Three generations: including Erasmus Darwin Hudson Sr. and Jr.
Three generations: including Erasmus Darwin Hudson Sr. and Jr.

Born in Torringford, Connecticut in 1806, and educated at the Torringford Academy and Berkshire Medical College (MD 1827), Erasmus Darwin Hudson became well known as a radical reformer. While establishing his medical practice in Bloomfield, Conn., and later in Springfield, Mass., and New York City, Hudson emerged as a force in the antislavery struggle, hewing to the non-resistant line. Touring the northeastern states as a lecturing agent for the Connecticut Anti-Slavery Society and general agent of the American Anti-Slavery Society, he regularly contributing articles to an antislavery periodicals and befriended many of the movement’s leaders. In his professional life as an orthopedic surgeon, Hudson earned acclaim for his contributions to the development of modern prosthetics. During the carnage of the Civil War, he introduced remarkable improvements in artificial limb technology and innovations in the treatment of amputations and battle trauma, winning awards for his contributions at international expositions in Paris (1867) and Philadelphia (1876). Hudson died of pneumonia on Dec. 31, 1880.

Spanning five generations of a family of physicians and social reformers, the Hudson Family Papers include particularly significant content for Erasmus Darwin Hudson documenting his activities with the Connecticut and American Anti-Slavery societies. Hudson’s journals and writings are accompanied by a rich run of correspondence with antislavery figures such as Abby Kelley, Wendell Phillips, Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Isaac Hopper, and Samuel May and a unique antislavery campaign map of New York state and surrounding areas (1841). Hudson’s medical career and that of his son Erasmus Darwin Hudson, Jr. (1843-1887), a thoracic physician, is equally well documented through correspondence, medical notes, and handwritten drafts of lectures, with other material ranging from family records and writings of and other family members to genealogies of the Hudson, Shaw, Clarke, Fowler, and Cooke families, and printed material, memorabilia, clipping and photographs.

Subjects
Abolitionists
African Americans--History
American Anti-slavery Society
Antislavery movements--Massachusetts
Connecticut Anti-slavery Society
Connecticut--History--19th century
Massachusetts--History--19th century
Physicians--New York
United States--History--1783–1865
Contributors
Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895
Foster, Abby Kelley, 1810-1887
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879
Gay, Sydney Howard, 1814-1888
Hopper, Isaac T. (Isaac Tatem), 1771-1852
Hudson Family
Hudson, Daniel Coe, 1774–1840
Hudson, Erasmus Darwin, 1806–1880
Hudson, Erasmus Darwin, 1843–1887
Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884
Smith, Gerrit, 1797-1874
Stone, Lucy, 1818-1893
Weld, Theodore Dwight, 1803-1895
Wright, Henry Clarke, 1797-1870
Types of material
Diaries
Letters (Correspondence)
Kingsbury family

Kingsbury Family Papers

1862-2006 Bulk: 1881-1902
10 boxes 6 linear feet
Call no.: MS 504
Depiction of Kingsbury children, ca.1910
Kingsbury children, ca.1910

The family of Roxana Kingsbury Gould (nee Weed) farmed the rocky soils of western New England during the late nineteenth century. Roxana’s first husband Ambrose died of dysentery shortly after the Civil War, leaving her to care for their two infant sons, and after marrying her second husband, Lyman Gould, she relocated from southwestern Vermont to Cooleyville and then (ten years later) to Shelburne, Massachusetts. The Goulds added a third son to their family in 1869.

A rich collection of letters and photographs recording the history of the Kingsbury-Gould families of Shelburne, Massachusetts. The bulk of the letters are addressed to Roxana Kingsbury Gould, the strong-willed matriarch at the center of the family, and to her granddaughter, May Kingsbury Phillips, the family’s first historian. In addition to documenting the complicated dynamics of a close-knit family, this collection is a rich source for the study of local history, rural New England, and the social and cultural practices at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries.

Gift of Conrad and Michiko Totman, 2006
Subjects
Conway (Mass.)--Genealogy
Kingsbury Family
Shelburne (Mass.)--Genealogy
Totman family
Contributors
Drew, Raymond Totman, 1923-1981
Lewis, Gertrude Minnie, 1896-
Totman, Conrad D
Totman, Ruth J
Types of material
Genealogies
Letters (Correspondence)
Memoirs
Photographs
Tintypes
Landon, Mary G. and Edward R.

Mary G. and Edward R. Landon Letters

1836-1841
1 file 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 038 bd

A native of Guilford, Conn., Edward Ruggles Landon emigrated to the Michigan Territory after graduating from Yale (1833) and receiving legal training in a New Haven law office. His time in the west, however, would prove difficult. Settling first in Detroit and then Tecumseh, Landon bore the full brunt of financial hardship, and after marrying in 1837 and losing both his wife and infant son the next year, he returned home to Guilford. Landon went on to enjoy a prominent career as attorney and judge of the New Haven County Probate Court.

The Landon collection consists entirely of typed transcripts of letters written by Mary Griswold Landon to her son Edward, during the few years he spent in Michigan. Filled with news of day to day life in Guilford, family and friends, domestic duties, financial challenges, and the occasional intervention of politics and national affairs, the letters are both a reflection of Edward’s experiences in the west and Mary’s strong personality and attitudes toward family and life in nineteenth-century Connecticut.

Subjects
Depressions--1837
Guilford (Conn.)--History
Landon, Anna Theodora Lay, 1817-1838
Lawyers--Michigan--19th century
Contributors
Landon, Edward Ruggles, 1812-1883
Landon, Mary Griswold, 1786-1871
Types of material
Letters (Correspondence)
Lesinski-Rusin family

Lesinski-Rusin Family Papers

1908-1925
2 boxes 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 131
Depiction of Nun and two girls at first communion, ca.1920
Nun and two girls at first communion, ca.1920

Polish immigrants Jan Lesinski and his wife Weronika (Rusin) settled in Easthampton, Massachusetts, in 1909 and worked in the textile mills there for decades. Married in 1922, the couple raised a son and daughter in their home on Franklin Street. Weronika Lesinski died in Northampton in 1961, her husband following twelve years later.

The Lesinski and Rusin family collection reflect the lives of an average working-class Polish family from Easthampton, Mass., during the early twentieth century. Numerous family photographs document important occasions for the families, such as baptisms, first communions, and weddings, and the photographic postcards and commercial postcards document their relationships, interests, and travel.

Gift of Mary Ryan, June 1990
Language(s): Polish
Subjects
Lesinski family
Polish Americans--Massachusetts--Easthampton
Rusin family
Soldiers--Massachusetts--Easthampton--Photographs
World War, 1914-1918--Photographs
Types of material
Photographs
Postcards
Scrapbooks
Lyman Family Papers

Lyman Family Papers

1839-1942
7 boxes 2.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 634
Depiction of Edward H.R. and Catharine A. Lyman on their wedding day
Edward H.R. and Catharine A. Lyman on their wedding day

The descendants of Joseph Lyman (1767-1847) flourished in nineteenth century Northampton, Mass., achieving social prominence, financial success, and a degree of intellectual acclaim. Having settled in Northampton before 1654, just a generation removed from emigration, the Lymans featured prominently in the development of the Connecticut River Valley. A Yale-educated clerk of the Hampshire County courts, Joseph’s descendants included sons Joseph Lyman (an engineer and antislavery man) and Samuel Fowler Lyman (a jurist), and three Harvard-educated grandsons, Benjamin Smith Lyman (a geologist and traveler in Meiji-era Japan) and brothers Joseph and Frank Lyman (both trained in the natural sciences).

Consisting of the scattered correspondence and photographic record of three generations of an intellectually adventurous Northampton family, the Lyman collection explores the ebb and flow of family relations, collegiate education, and educational travel in Europe during the mid-nineteenth century, with important content on antislavery and the Free State movement in Kansas. Although the family’s tendency to reuse names (repeatedly) presents a challenge in distinguishing the various recipients, the focal points of the collection include the geologist Benjamin Smith Lyman, his uncle Joseph (1812-1871), cousins Joseph (1851-1883) and Frank, and Frank’s son Frank Lyman, Jr. Antislavery is a major theme in the letters of Samuel F. Lyman to his son Benjamin, and in the letterbook of the Kansas Land Trust, an affiliate of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, of which the elder Joseph was Treasurer.

Gift of Christine Lyman Chase, 2009.
Subjects
Antislavery movements--Massachusetts
Germany--Description and travel--19th century
Harvard University--Students
Kansas Land Trust
Kansas--History--1854-1861
New England Emigrant Aid Company
Contributors
Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920
Lyman, Joseph B, 1812-1871
Types of material
Photographs
Lyman, Florence Porter

Florence Porter Lyman Papers

1894-1931
10 boxes 5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 946
Depiction of Florence Porter Lyman with her dog (from the Lyman Family Papers)
Florence Porter Lyman with her dog (from the Lyman Family Papers)

Florence Porter Lyman (1870-1960) was born into the Chapin Moodey family in the late 19th century. She married Charles Wendell Porter, a Northampton lawyer who spent his summers in Northern Maine, in 1894. After her first husband’s death in 1899 she continued to spend her summers in Maine. She then married Frank Lyman of the prominent Lyman family in 1903. They had three children together and lived in both Northampton and Brooklyn. During her summers in Northern Maine, Florence Porter Lyman stayed in touch with her many family and friends who lived in Massachusetts and New York.

This collection contains almost forty years of Florence Porter Lyman’s in-coming correspondence. Letters refer primarily to domestic matters including: her first husband’s train accident and death, her engagement and re-marriage to Frank Lyman, and the birth of her three children.

Subjects
Northampton (Mass.)--History
Northampton (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Perry (Me.)--History
Perry (Me.)--Social life and customs
Contributors
Lyman, Frank, 1852-1938
Porter, Charles Wendell, 1866-1899
Types of material
Correspondence
Lyons Family

Lyons Family Correspondence

1859-1895
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 133

Includes letters addressed mostly to Mary Lyons or her brother Frederick D. Lyons about friends and family in Greenfield and Colrain, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa. Topics discussed are sickness, death, accidents, an instance of probable wife abuse, recipes, Greenfield scandals, clothing, quilting, Methodist/Universalist bickering, and Aunt Mary’s investments.

Subjects
Abused wives--United States--History--19th century
Clothing and dress--United States--History--19th century
Colrain (Mass.)--Biography
Colrain (Mass.)--Social life and customs--19th century
Cookery--United States--History--19th century
Greenfield (Mass.)--Biography
Greenfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs--19th century
Lyons family
Methodist Church--Relations--Universalist Church
Methodist Church--United States--History--19th century
Quilting--United States--History--19th century
Scandals--Massachusetts--Greenfield--History--19th century
Universalist churches--Relations--Methodist Church
Universalist churches--United States--History--19th century
Wife abuse--United States--History--19th century
Women--Massachusetts--Colrain--Correspondence
Contributors
Lyons, J. L
Lyons, Mary
Types of material
Letters (Correspondence)
Men’s Resource Center for Change

Men's Resource Center Records

ca. 1982-2007
6 boxes 7.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 813

In 1982, Steven Botkin, who had done his doctoral work in the social justice program at UMass Amherst’s School of Education, co-founded the Men’s Resource Connection (MRC) in Amherst, Mass., to promote healthy ideas of masculinity and male leadership by challenging harmful stereotypes involving violence, sexism, and oppression and creating a local network of men as well as of men and women. In 1983 MRC started a newsletter, Valley Men, which became the magazine Voice Male, with a circulation of 10,000. Incorporated as a nonprofit in 1988, MRC developed programs to serve and educate men, with a focus on violence and domestic violence in particular, notably Men Overcoming Violence (MOVE), later called Moving Forward. In 1993 the MRC changed its name to the Men’s Resource Center of Western Massachusetts, and by 2005 it was known as the Men’s Resource Center for Change. Both a social service agency and a social justice organization, MRC made an impact in communities around and far beyond western Massachusetts. It offered workshops, classes, support groups, trainings, and consultations for adult men and youths, on issues relating to violence, anger, surviving abuse, emotional well-being, race, fatherhood, sexuality, and more. In 2016, after several years of financial struggle in the wake of the recession of the late 2000s, MRC announced its plans to merge with Men’s Resources International (MRI), founded by Botkin in 2004, to form MERGE for Equality, Inc. Voice Male, now a national magazine, has a robust online presence as an independent publication.

The MRC Records span most of the organization’s history and include correspondence and memos, background reading and training material, fliers and other ephemera, annual reports, newsletters and copies of Voice Male, clippings (including Voice Male articles organized by subject), and audio and video tapes.

Subjects
Masculinity
Men’s movement
Violence in men
Contributors
Okun, Rob A.
Types of material
Annual reports
Clippings (information artifacts)
Fliers (printed matter)
Newsletters