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Feinberg, Kenneth R., 1945-

Kenneth R. Feinberg Papers

1980-2011
217 boxes 325.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 755
Depiction of Ken Feinberg at JFK Library
Ken Feinberg at JFK Library

One of the most prominent and dedicated attorneys of our time, Kenneth R. Feinberg has assumed the important role of mediator in a number of complex legal disputes, often in the aftermath of public tragedies. Frequently these cases necessitate not only determining compensation to victims and survivors but also confronting the very question of the value of human life. A native of Brockton, Massachusetts, and a graduate of UMass Amherst (1967) and New York University School of Law (1970), Feinberg served as a clerk to Chief Judge Stanley H. Fuld, as a federal prosecutor, and as Chief of Staff for Senator Edward M. Kennedy. After acting as the mediator and special master of the high-profile Agent Orange settlement, he administered the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, Virginia Tech’s Hokie Spirit Memorial Fund, and the BP Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF). Feinberg has taught at several law schools; is the author of the books What is Life Worth? and Who Gets What and numerous articles; and is a devotee of opera and classical music. He practices law in Washington, D.C., and continues to be guided by a commitment to public service.

The Feinberg Papers contain correspondence, memos, drafts, reports, research files, and memorabilia. The collection is arriving in stages and is being processed. Some materials will be restricted.

Gift of Kenneth R. Feinberg, 2012-2017

Subjects

Compensation (Law)--United StatesCompromise (Law)--United StatesDamages--United StatesProducts liability--Agent OrangePublic Policy (Law)--United StatesReparation (Criminal justice)--United StatesSeptember 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

Contributors

Feinberg, Kenneth R., 1945-

Types of material

Correspondence (letters)Legal filesVideotapes
Feinberg, Kenneth R., 1945-

Kenneth R. Feinberg Collection of Classical Music Programs

1967-2015
6 boxes 9 linear feet
Call no.: MS 766
Depiction of Program, Metropolitan Opera, 1969
Program, Metropolitan Opera, 1969

Attorney and UMass alumnus Kenneth R. Feinberg, well known as a mediator, special master of compensation funds, and dedicated public servant, is a longtime devotee of opera and classical music. Since his days as a law student in New York in the late 1960s, continuing through his career practicing law in Washington, D.C., Feinberg has regularly attended operas, concerts, musical theater, and other musical performances. He has also served as president of the Washington National Opera and led a private opera appreciation group.

This extensive collection of more than 1,000 items encompasses a wide range of composers, productions, concerts, companies, and venues, mainly in the United States, with some European performances represented. Documenting more than four decades of concert- and opera-going, and arranged in rough chronological order according to Feinberg’s numbering system, the programs are searchable by composer in an accompanying card index. There is also a small amount of related ephemera, including some vintage programs. Additions to the collection are expected.

Gift of Kenneth R. Feinberg, Nov. 2012

Subjects

MusicMusical theaterOperaSymphony orchestras

Contributors

Feinberg, Kenneth R., 1945-

Types of material

Card filesEphemeraPlaybills
Garside, Kenneth G.

Kenneth G. Garside Papers

1923-2015
5 boxes 2.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 887
Depiction of

A noted South Shore cranberry grower, Kenneth Greenwood Garside was graduate of Harvard (Chemistry, 1927) and MIT (MS, Gas and Chemical Engineering, 1929). After working for several years in the electric industry, he relocated to Duxbury, Mass., in 1937 to taking over operations of 406 acres of cranberry bog. Over the next twenty-five years as a grower, Garside served as Director of the New England Cranberry Sales Co. and as a board member of the National Cranberry Association, and after dissolving his partnership in the Duxbury Cranberry Company in 1956, he served as acting General Manager of Ocean Spray during the aminotriazole crisis of 1959-1960. Following his retirement from the bogs, Garside taught science in schools in Florida and Maine. He died at Blue Hill, Maine, in 1987.

The Garside Papers contain nearly forty years of letters between the Massachusetts cranberry grower Kenneth G. Garside and his daughter Anne G. Cann. Rich and well-written, these letters reflect Garside’s work and touch on his many interests, from cranberry culture to politics, family, and education. The collection also contains fascinating material

Gift of Anne G. Cann, 2016

Subjects

Cranberry industry--Massachusetts--Duxbury

Contributors

Cann, Anne G.
Skinner, Kenneth G.

Kenneth G. Skinner Collection

ca.1908-1928
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1027
Depiction of Spiritualist Church and Lucy Parker's house, ca.1908
Spiritualist Church and Lucy Parker's house, ca.1908

Granted in 1737 and incorporated in 1754, Greenwich, Mass., was the first town in the Swift River Valley settled by Europeans. Sitting astride the East and Middle branches of the Swift River and forming the eastern boundary of Hampshire County, Greenwich was primarily an agricultural town with light manufacturing and, beginning in the later nineteenth century, an active tourist trade. The town’s population peaked at over 1,100 early in the nineteenth century, declining slowly thereafter.

The photographic postcards in this collection all relate to the Quabbin town of Greenwich and were originally housed in an album of uncertain provenance. Primarily “real photo” postcards and dating between approximately 1908 and 1928, they were labeled by a knowledgeable, but unknown person at a later date to identify the houses, roads, stores, and views. Unlike many of the commercial postcards of the day, they present a very down-to-earth view of the town, its rocky fields, mills, houses and stores, and its summer hotels.

Subjects

Dwellings--Massachusetts--Greenwich--PhotographsGeneral stores--Massachusetts--Greenwich--PhotographsGreenwich (Mass.)--PhotographsQuabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--PhotographsSwift River Valley (Mass.)--Photographs

Types of material

Photographic postcardsPhotographs
Wetherbee, David Kenneth

David Kenneth Wetherbee Collection of New Salem

1980
3 boxes 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 305

David Kenneth Wetherbee was a naturalist and local historian who lived for many years in the small town of New Salem, Mass. Receiving a doctorate in ornithology from the University of Connecticut in 1959, Wetherbee worked as an adjunct instructor in Wildlife Biology at UMass Amherst and pursued his eclectic research agenda that ran from butterflies in the Caribbean to the history of his adopted New Salem. He died in 1997 at the age of 70.

This unusual collection is the result of David K. Wetherbee’s concerted effort to collocate data on the early settlement of New Salem, Mass., and his attempt to “reconstruct” the record book of the town’s Proprietors that had succumbed to fire in 1856. In addition to a scarce copy of his eccentric summary of his findings, Heare Lies Salim New Grant, the collection includes notes on the original divisions of land among the early settlers, arranged by division; and information on each of the early settlers and their landholdings, arranged alphabetically by name.

Gift of David K. Wetherbee

Subjects

Birds--Massachusetts--New SalemGeology--Massachusetts--New SalemNew Salem (Mass.)--History
Fellowships & prizes

Close up of old book

SCUA offers several fellowship opportunities to support scholars wishing to conduct research in our collections. SCUA Fellows receive a stipend of $2,500, with a travel allowance of up to an additional $500 depending on need. Fellows are expected to spend a total of one month in residence during the period of the fellowship year: June 1 through May 31.

Application process:

SCUA uses a single application process for all fellowship programs, with applications accepted online only. A complete applicant’s packet will include:

  • A brief biographical statement of not more than 350 words with a description of your larger research agenda to be used for publicity purposes.
  • An overview of the proposed project not to exceed three pages.
  • A current resume or CV.
  • One confidential letter of reference.

Selection process:

Fellows will be selected according to the scholarly merit of their proposal as judged by the committee of reviewers; demonstrated need to use SCUA’s holdings; and fit to the particular fellowship program.

Application deadline:

First Friday in March of each year. This year’s deadline will be March 16, 2020. Awards will be announced April 6.

2020 FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION

Fellowship Programs

Du Bois Research Fellowship

The Du Bois research fellowships are now managed by our partner, the W. E. B. Du Bois Center. You can find information about this program and application materials on the Du Bois Center’s website. The application requirements and timeline described above might not apply to this fellowship program.

Brother David Steindl-Rast Fellowship

Scope: To support research that engages with the spiritual dimensions of social change.

Eligibility: Graduate students and early career professionals (within five years of receipt of a PhD), however, we strongly encourage independent scholars and those outside academia to apply.

John William Bennet Fellowship

Scope: To support research and writing in the history of labor, work, and industry, honoring the legacy of labor historian and activist John William Bennett.

Eligibility: Graduate students and early career professionals (within five years of receipt of a PhD) but we are open to proposals by labor historians without academic affiliation.

Kenneth R. Feinberg Fellowship (two will be awarded)

Scope: To support research that touches on the theme of the value of human life or that otherwise resonates with the legacy of Kenneth R. Feinberg.

Eligibility: Graduate students and early career professionals (within five years of receipt of a PhD).

Esperantic Studies Foundation Fellowship

Scope: To support research in the history and culture of planned languages, with a strong emphasis on Esperanto and the Esperanto movement

Eligibility: Graduate students and early career professionals (within five years of receipt of a PhD).

Learn more:

Miscellaneous Manuscripts

Miscellaneous Manuscripts

1717-2003
6 boxes 5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 719

Miscellaneous Manuscripts is an artificial collection that brings together single items and small groups of related materials. Although the collection reflects the general collecting emphases in SCUA, particularly the history of New England, the content ranges widely in theme and format.

Subjects

Massachusetts--Economic conditions--18th centuryMassachusetts--Economic conditions--19th centuryMassachusetts--HistoryMassachusetts--Politics and governmentMassachusetts--Social conditions--18th centuryMassachusetts--Social conditions--19th centuryMassachusetts--Social conditions--20th century

Types of material

Account booksCorrespondencePhotographs
Allen, Theodore W., 1919-2005

Theodore W. Allen Papers

1946-2005
47 boxes 64 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1021
Part of: Jeffrey B. Perry Collection
Depiction of Theodore W. Allen
Theodore W. Allen

An anti-white supremacist, working class intellectual and activist, Theodore W. “Ted” Allen was one of the most important thinkers on race and class in the twentieth century. He developed his pioneering class struggle-based analysis of “white skin privilege” beginning in the mid-1960s; authored the seminal two-volume The Invention of the White Race in the 1990s; and consistently maintained that the struggle against white supremacy was central to efforts at radical social change in the United States. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, Allen was raised in Kentucky and West Virginia, where he was “proletarianized” by the Great Depression. A member of the American Federation of Musicians and the United Mine Workers, and a member of the Communist Party, Allen moved to Brooklyn after injuring his back in the mines, and spent the last fifty years of his life at various jobs including factory work, teaching, the post office, and the Brooklyn Public Library. In the 1960s, having broken from the Communist Party, Allen set out on his own independent research course. Inspired by the work of W. E. B. Du Bois he wrote on the “white blindspot” and “white skin privilege” and began what became forty years of work focused on white supremacy as the principal retardant of class consciousness among European-American workers. Over his last thirty years, Allen wrote hundreds of published and unpublished articles and letters challenging white supremacy, capitalist rule, sexism, and U.S. Imperialism, as well as numerous poems.

The Theodore W. Allen Papers are a comprehensive assemblage of correspondence, published and unpublished writings, audio and video materials, and research by one of the major theorists on race and class of the twentieth century. The Papers offer important insights on the Old and New Left and their relation to the labor and Civil Rights/Black Liberation Movements and have much to offer students, scholars, researchers, and activists.

Gift of Jeffrey B. Perry, May 2018

Subjects

Communists--New York (State)Historians--New York (State)Labor movementRaceRacism

Contributors

Ignatiev, NoelSojourner Truth Organization

Types of material

Photographs
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Boston Joint Board

ACWA Boston Joint Board Records

1926-1979
8 linear feet
Call no.: MS 002

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America originated from a split in the United Garment Workers in 1914 and quickly became the dominant force for union in the men’s clothing industry, controlling shops in Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, and New York. The Boston Joint Board formed at the beginning of the ACWA and included locals from a range of ethnic groups and trades that comprised the industry. It coordinated the activities and negotiations for ACWA Locals 1, 12, 102, 149, 171, 172, 173, 174, 181,183, 267, and 335 in the Boston area. In the 1970s the Boston Joint Board merged with others to form the New England Regional Joint Board.

Records, including minutes, contracts, price lists, and scrapbooks, document the growth and maturity of the ACWA in Boston and the eventual decline of the industry in New England. Abundant contracts and price lists show the steady improvement of conditions for workers in the men’s clothing industry. Detailed minutes reflect the political and social influence of the ACWA; the Joint Board played an important role in local and state Democratic politics and it routinely contributed to a wide range of social causes including the Home for Italian Children and the United Negro College Fund. Minutes also document the post World War II development of industrial relations in the industry and include information relating to Joint Board decisions to strike. Minutes also contain information relating to shop grievances, arbitration, shop committees, and organizing. The records largely coincide with the years of leadership of Joseph Salerno, ACWA Vice President and New England Director from 1941 to 1972.

Gift of the New England Regional Joint Board, through Edward Clark, Nov. 1984

Subjects

Boston (Mass.)--Economic conditions--20th centuryClothing trade--Labor unions--MassachusettsLabor unions--Massachusetts--BostonTextile industry--MassachusettsTextile workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts--BostonTextile workers--Massachusetts--Economic conditions--20th century

Contributors

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Boston Joint BoardSalerno, Joseph, fl. 1907-1972

Types of material

ContractsFinancial recordsMinutes (Administrative records)Scrapbooks
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Journeymen Tailors Union. Local 115

ACWA Journeyman Tailors Union Local 115 Records

1945-1984
2 boxes 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 025

Local 115 of Connecticut was comprised of branches from Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven, and Waterbury, and affiliated with the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America.

The ACWA records consist of minutes of meetings, correspondence, reports, and contracts. Also included are a number of agreements between local businesses and the union identifying the union as the bargaining representative of their employees.

Subjects

Clothing trade--Labor unions--ConnecticutLabor unions--Connecticut

Contributors

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America
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