Results for: “University of Massachusetts Amherst. Extension Service” (950 collections)SCUA

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UMass Amherst. University Relations

UMass Amherst. University Relations, 1988-2007.


Call no.: RG 39

The Vice Chancellor for University Advancement oversees the campus’s Development and Alumni Relations areas and is responsible for operation of the UMass Amherst Foundation and of Advancement Communications, the group that produces the University’s website, UMass Amherst Magazine, and a variety of other print and online publications. Beginning in September 1983, the unit was administered by the Vice-Chancellor for University Relations and Development, which was renamed Vice Chancellor for University Advancement in 1993.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Office of University Relations

Farley, George L.

George L. Farley Papers, 1936-1937.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 056

George Lewis Farley helped build the model for extension services before the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, which mandated federal funds to land-grant Universities for supporting local agriculture. Referred to as “Uncle” George, Farley lead the Massachusetts 4-H Club for 25 years beginning in 1918 and was the first to create a 4-H clubhouse on a University campus. Born in Lynn, Mass. in 1873, Farley worked as the superintendent of schools in Brockton, Mass. before joining the University extension service. Farley died in 1941.

The George L. Farley Papers document the 4-H and Massachusetts extension service’s appreciation of Farley’s leadership through two books presented to Farley in 1936 and 1937. The first book contains the signatures of the members of all the Massachusetts 4-H clubs, organized by county and town. The second book is a scrapbook of letters of appreciation from friends, colleagues, farmers, senators, among which is a letter from then-president Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Subjects

  • 4-H Clubs
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Extension Service

Contributors

  • Farley, George L

Civilian Public Service Camps

Civilian Public Service Camp Newsletter Collection, 1941-1944.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 537

Born out of a unique collaboration between the United States government and the historic peace churches, the first Civilian Public Service Camps were established in 1941 to provide conscientious objectors the option to perform alternative service under civilian command. Nearly 12,000 COs served in the 152 CPS camps in projects ranging from soil conservation, agriculture, and forestry to mental health. While the work was supposed to be of national importance, many of the men later complained that the labor was menial and not as important as they had hoped. Furthermore with no ability to earn wages and with their churches and families responsible for financing the camps, many COs, their wives and children found themselves impoverished both during and after the war.

During their time off, many of the men in the CPS camps published newsletters discussing education programs, which frequently involved religious study, work projects, and news about individuals sent to family and friends back home. This collections consists of newsletters created in camps in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Indiana, Maryland, and Colorado.

Subjects

  • Civilian Public Service--Periodicals
  • Conscientious objectors--United States
  • Pacifists--United States
  • World War, 1939-1945--Conscientious objectors--United States

Types of material

  • Newsletters

U.S. Information Service

United States Information Service Photographs of Laos, 1961-1969.

1 envelope (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 145

Photographs taken in the 1960s by the United States Information Service depicting Lao dignitaries, the funeral of King Sisavongvong, the cremation of Prince Ratsamphanthavong at Luong Prabong, a Pathet Lao soldier, a Yao woman, and a Lao woman.

Subjects

  • Laos--Photographs

Types of material

  • Photographs

UMass Amherst. Academic Departments

UMass Amherst. Academic Departments, Programs, Institutes, Centers, 1870-2007.


Call no.: RG 25

The academic departments at UMass Amherst are organized within ten schools and colleges. Among the more than 88 degree programs in 2009, 74 confer masters degrees, and 53 confer doctorates.

Containing the records of individual academic departments, programs, institutes, and centers, Record Group 25 documents the shifting history of disciplinarity and departmental affairs at UMass Amherst. The papers of individual faculty members are contained within the Faculty and Staff (FS) collections and are indexed separately in UMarmot.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty

UMass Amherst. Faculty and Staff

UMass Amherst. Faculty and Staff, 1863-2007.


Call no.: RG 40

The faculty at UMass Amherst has grown from five when Massachusetts Agricultural College opened its doors in 1869 to nearly 1,200 full time members in 2009.

In addition to extensive documentation of the Faculty Senate and other groups, RG 40 includes documentation of over 5,000 individual members of UMass Amherst faculty and staff, with information ranging from vitae and resumes to research notes, newsclippings, and publications, mostly originating with or gathered by the University or University Archives. The personal and professional papers of individual faculty members are housed and entered into UMarmot separately (with call numbers beginning FS), and materials for faculty who also held administrative posts may be filed in the relevant record group(s).

Subjects

  • Universities and colleges--Faculty--Labor unions
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty

Contributors

  • Massachusetts Society of Professors
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Faculty Senate

UMass Amherst. Graduate School

UMass Amherst. Graduate School, 1896-2007.

(70 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 10

The University of Massachusetts Amherst has offered graduate education since 1896, awarding more than 11,360 doctoral and 37,480 master’s degrees. With a graduate faculty of 1,100 (2006), the Amherst campus offers 50 programs leading to a doctorate and 68 programs toward a master’s degree.

Included in the records of the Graduate School are files related to the the Dean of the School, its graduate programs, and the records of the Boston Office of the University Press.

Subjects

  • Graduate students--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Graduate School
  • University of Massachusetts Press

Amherst (Mass.)?

Grocer's Daybook, 1888-1890.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 137 bd

Unnamed grocer who was possibly from the town of Amherst in either Massachusetts or New Hampshire. Daybook includes customers’ names, their account numbers, and the items that they purchased whether food or supplies.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Consumers--New England--History--19th century
  • Groceries--New England--History--19th century
  • Grocers--New England--History--19th century
  • Grocery trade--New England--History--19th century

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Amherst Disarmament Coalition. Vigil for Peace and Justice

Amherst Disarmament Coalition Collection, 1979-1987..

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 165

Vigil for Peace and Justice group that peacefully protested the Vietnam War, nuclear weapons, and government policy in Central America and the Middle East by organizing a weekly vigil in downtown Amherst, Massachusetts. Includes handouts and news clippings.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Social conditions--20th century
  • Anti-imperialist movements--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Nuclear Moratorium Vigil (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Social movements--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Vigil for Peace and Justice (Amherst, Mass.)

Contributors

  • Amherst Disarmament Coalition (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Crowe, Frances, 1919-

Types of material

  • Handbills

Amherst Growth Study Committee, Inc.

Amherst Growth Study Committee Records, 1971-1974.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 543

In May 1971 Otto Paparazzo Associates announced their plans to develop 640 acres of land in East Amherst upon which a proposed 2,200 residential units, a commercial center, and a golf course would be built. Concerned about unnatural growth of the community and about the effect such a development would have on the environment, a group of residents formed the Amherst Growth Study Committee within a few months of the announcement. Despite these concerns, the Zoning Board of Appeals issued a formal permit for construction in December 1971, which the AGSC immediately appealed. Even though the group was unable to overturn the zoning board’s decision, they did achieve their ends, in part, when state and town agencies prevented the project from moving forward due to an overloaded sewage system. More importantly, the group increased public awareness about growth and housing in the town of Amherst.

Records include notes from AGSC meetings, correspondence, and newspaper clippings documenting coverage of the story in local papers.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst (Mass.)--Politics and government

Contributors

  • Amherst Growth Study Committee, Inc
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