Results for: “Scanning electron micrographs” (17 collections)SCUA

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Whisler, Howard C. (Howard Clinton)

Howard C. Whisler Papers, 1963-2007.

5 boxes (7.6 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 716

As an undergraduate at the University of California Berkeley, Howard Whisler was introduced to the study of zoosporic fungi, beginning what would become a lifelong interest in evolutionary protistology. During his graduate work at Berkeley, Whisler focused on fungi associated with invertebrates, receiving his doctorate in 1960 for a study of the entomogenous fungus Amoebidium parasiticum. He joined the faculty at the University of Washington in 1963, where he remained until his retirement in 1999. A prolific researcher, and developer of the fungal research program at the Friday Harbor Marine Biological Laboratory, he became noted for his work on zoosporic fungi and protists, particularly of parasites or commensals in arthropods, with publications ranging from studies of reproduction in the Monoblepharidales to the molecular systematics of Saprolegnia in salmon, and the sexual stages and life cycle of Coelomomyces, a fungal pathogen of mosquitos. An active member of the Mycological Society of America, Whisler was also a founder of the International Society of Evolutionary Protistology with Max Taylor and Lynn Margulis. Whisler died on Sept. 16, 2007, at the age of 76.

The Whisler Papers contain correspondence, notebooks, scanning electron micrographs, and motion pictures dating primarily from the mid- to late 1970s.

Subjects

  • Fungi--Study and teaching
  • International Society of Evolutionary Protistology
  • Mycology

Contributors

  • Whisler, Howard C. (Howard Clinton)

Types of material

  • Motion pictures (Visual work)
  • Scanning electron micrographs

Antipa, Gregory A.

Gregory A. Antipa Papers, 1953-1960.

10 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 567

A specialist in ciliate development and ecology, Gregory Antipa received a doctorate in Zoology at the University of Illinois in 1970, and since 1978, has been on faculty at San Francisco State University. Working with Paramecium, Conchophthirus, and other taxa, Antipa’s research has ventured into structure/function relationships, chemotaxis, and cellular adaptations, and he has been involved in research into the decomposition of organic wastes by protozoa. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Society for Cell Biology,the Microscopy Society of America, and the International Society of Protistologists.

The Antipa collection consists primarily of electron micrographs of ciliates Condylostoma, Trichodina, Conchophthirus, and the mussel encommensal Mytilophilus, along with a lab manual on protist culture and assorted notes.

Subjects

  • Conchophthirus
  • Condylostoma
  • Protozoans--Development
  • Trichodina

Contributors

  • Antipa, Gregory A

Types of material

  • Scanning electron micrographs

Chase, David G.

David G. Chase Collection, ca.1975-1987.

3 boxes (4.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 809

An electron microscopist affiliated with the Sepulveda Veterans Administration Hospital, David Chase (1935-1986) was known for his skill in fixation, staining, and sectioning and for the exceptional quality of his micrographs. During his career, Chase applied his skills to produce thousands of images of the structure, ultrastructure, and morphology of prokaryotes, ranging from filamented, segmented bacteria to the flagellate Giardia, and gram-negative bacteria. In collaboration with Lynn Margulis of the UMass Amherst Department of Biology, Chase worked on a series of papers on the symbiotic flagellated protozoan communities in the hindguts of four species of California termites.

The Chase collection consists of over 1,800 TEM photos and their negatives, 134 polaroid prints, and about half a linear foot of loose notes and a register.

Subjects

  • Endosymbiosis
  • Protozoans--Composition

Contributors

  • Margulis, Lynn, 1938-2011

Types of material

  • Laboratory notes
  • Transmission electron micrographs

Protistology

History of Protistology

“The province of protozoa, reminiscent of the fertile crescent in the Middle East, straddles the highways of thought that run between the major continents of biology. Down these roads come caravans of concepts and analogies: ideas about hierarchies and taxonomies from one direction, convictions about the basic structures and functions of life from another, opinions about reproduction and development from a third, and theories of the origin and evolution of life’s forms from still another quarter. It is uncanny how these separate trains of thought intersect one another in the land of the single-celled organisms. There they interact, exchange views, and rearrange their loads before they disperse again to inform other regions of biology of their contents and conclusions. A complete history of protozoology must recognize the centrality of this terrain.”

Frederick B. Churchill. 1989. “Toward the History of Protozoology,” Journal of the History of Biology 22: 185-187.

Protistology (formerly called protozoology) is the scientific study of unicellular eukaryotes and their relatives — single cells as living organisms. Protists make up 57 of the 60 distinct “ultrastructural identities” of eukaryotes, with the macroscopic forms most familiar to us (plants, animals and fungi) nestled amongst the other three (Simpson and Patterson, 2007). An extraordinarily diverse assemblage of organisms, protists have distinctive genetic systems, numerous primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of symbiosis, and unique cytoskeletons, and they play important roles in food webs and as pathogens. Among them are some of the most serious human parasites, including the malaria parasites Plasmodium spp., Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Entamoeba and Trichomonas. Many protists, such as Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and Dictyostelium, have become important experimental organisms in scientific and medical research.

What do the Protistology Collections include?

The Protistology collections at UMass focus on the unique aspects of protist biology, those not found in plants, animals and fungi, but which inform our understanding of the evolution of these macroscopic lineages. In addition to having the professional papers, lab notebooks and journals of some of the leading 20th century protistologists, the collection includes the world’s primary repository of light and electron micrographs of protists. Due to the ubiquity and diversity of protists, the collections cross a broad range of disciplines and methodologies, from evolutionary biology to ecology, physiology, medicine, and public health.

The growing number of collections include the papers of:

For further information, please contact the Archivists.

References

Simpson and Patterson, 2007. In Katz, L.A. and D. Bhattacharya, eds. Genomics and Evolution of Microbial Eukaryotes. Oxford

Ritter, Hope T.

Hope T. Ritter Papers, 1947-1987.

6 boxes (9 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 572

The protistologist Hope T. Ritter (1919-2007) is recognized for his important research on the evolution of mitosis. A native of Allentown, Pa., Ritter received his doctorate at Lehigh University in 1955 for a study of the gut fauna in a subterranean termite. Building on this research during the 1950s, he became the first scientist to successfully culture Barbulanympha, a hindgut flagellate symbiont of the wood-eating cockroach Cryptocercus, which has since become a model organism for study of the evolution of mitosis. After teaching at Harvard (1957-1961) and SUNY Buffalo, Ritter moved to the University of Georgia in 1966, where he remained until his retirement from teaching in 1987.

The Ritter Papers contain valuable professional correspondence, lab notebooks, and a large number of electron micrographs documenting his research.

Subjects

  • Barbulanympha
  • Protozoans--Composition

Contributors

  • Ritter, Hope T

Types of material

  • Scanning electron micrographs

Satir, Birgit H.

Birgit H. and Peter Satir Papers, 1970-2000.

37 boxes (55.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 706

Distinguished researchers in the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Birgit and Peter Satir have made fundamental contributions to the study of exocytosis and the ultrastructure of cellular motility. While working on his doctorate at the Rockefeller Institute, Peter spent 1958 studying at the Carlsberg Biological Institute in Copenhagen, where he met Birgit. After completing their degrees in 1961 and marrying the next year, the couple went on to academic appointments at the University of Chicago and Berkeley. Although they are considered the first couple to be allowed to work in the same department at Berkeley, Birgit was never fully salaried, prompting the Satirs to move to more favorable circumstances at Einstein in 1977. Birgit’s research has centered on the nature of microdomains in cell membranes and how cells secrete chemical products, while Peter has studied the role of the structure and function of cilia and flagellae in cell motility.

The Satir collection contains professional correspondence, journals, and several thousand electron micrographs and motion picture films of ciliates and flagellates taken in the course of their research.

Subjects

  • Cell biology
  • Ciliates
  • Flagellata
  • Protozoans--Composition

Contributors

  • Satir, Birgit H.
  • Satir, Peter

Types of material

  • Scanning electron micrographs

Small, Eugene B.

Eugene B. Small Papers, 1964-2007.

7 boxes (10.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 591

Specializing in study of the biology and evolutionary history of ciliophorans, Eugene B. Small conducted both laboratory and field studies in comparative morphology and morphogenesis, ciliate ecology, phylogeny, life history, and nutrition. He was particularly noted for his work on ciliophorans from marine habitats ranging from the psammitic shores to the pelagic zones to deep sea hydrothermal vents. After receiving his doctorate at UCLA in 1964, Small served on the Zoology faculty at the University of Illinois and, from 1972, in the Department of Biology at the University of Maryland.

The collection consists primarily of thousands of electron micrographs of ciliophorans taken over the course of Small’s career, along with a small number of laboratory and field notebooks.

Subjects

  • Ciliata
  • Evolution (Biology)
  • University of Maryland--Faculty

Contributors

  • Small, Eugene B

Types of material

  • Laboratory notes
  • Scanning electron micrographs

Azzola, Friedrich Karl

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Karl Friedrich Azzola Collection, 1976-2009.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 665

Born in December 1931, Friedrich Karl Azzola fled with his family to Germany in 1944. Settling in the state of Hesse, he earned a degree in chemistry at the University of Giessen and doctorate at the Technische Hochschule Darmstadt in 1965. After five years in the chemical industry, he was called to the Fachhochschule Wiesbaden-Russelsheim as professor, teaching chemistry and materials science to engineers until his retirement in 1997. Beginning in the 1950s, Azzola earned a wide reputation for his research on gravemarkers and “cemetery culture,” publishing widely on Medieval and early modern monuments in Germany.

Part of the Association for Gravestone Studies Collection, the Azzola collection consists of a run of Friedhof und Denkmal (2000-2009, with a few earlier issues), along with a suite of offprints of articles and pamphlets by Azzola and others on cemeteries and gravemarkers.

Subjects

  • Friedhof und Denkmal
  • Sepulchral monuments--Germany

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Azzola, Friedrich Karl

Bradbury, Phyllis C. (Phyllis Clarke)

Phyllis C. Bradbury Papers, 1966-2005.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 774

After earning her doctorate in zoology at University of California Berkeley in 1965 and a two year postdoctoral fellowship at Rockefeller University, Phyllis Bradbury joined the zoology faculty at North Carolina State, remaining there for 31 years. A prolific researcher and expert electron microscopist, Bradbury’s research interests centered on the morphogenesis of ciliates and the fine structure of protozoan parasites of marine invertebrates. Beyond research, however, she became a pioneer in improving conditions on campus for women faculty, students, and staff, leading efforts to secure salary equity for faculty women and to provide mentoring for women faculty at NC State. After retiring in 1998, Bradbury settled in Eastport, Maine.

The heart of the Bradbury collection is a significant run of correspondence with Dorothy Pitelka, her dissertation advisor, friend, and long-time colleague at Berkeley, along with some miscellaneous professional correspondence and a series of reprints.

Subjects

  • Invertebrates--Parasites
  • North Carolina State University--Faculty
  • Protozoans--Composition
  • Women biologists

Contributors

  • Pitelka, Dorothy R. (Dorothy Riggs), 1920-

Concordance for the Archives, IJ

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

I

IASH
see Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (IASH) (1981- ) RG-6/19
Ice Hockey
see Sports-Men’s Hockey (1910- ) RG-18/2
Sports-Women’s Hockey (1993) RG-18/2
Ichthus (Student Publication) (1967)
RG-45/00/I3
Iconographic Materials, etc. (Oversize)
RG-182
ICP Information Newsletter (Computer and Information Science) (1975- )
RG-25/C3/00
IDB
Information Data Bank RG-30/2/4
IGS
see Institute for Governmental Services (IGS) RG-3/8
Ikhana (Student Publication) (1962-1964)
RG-45/00/I4
Illuminating (newsletter-College of Humanities and Fine Arts) (2000- )
RG-11/10
Immigrant and Refuge Community Leadership and Empowerment, Center for
see Center for Immigrant and Refugee Community Leadership and Empowerment (CIRCLE) RG-13/4/2/4/1
Impact (Office of Economic Development) (1997- )
RG-4/15
In Common (UMass Extention Quarterly) (2002- )
RG-15/8
In Focus (1992- )
RG-25/I6/00
In Touch (School of Education) (1971-1985)
RG-13/00
Increased Recruitment, Task Force on (1991)
RG-40/2/I4
Independents, Young
see Young Independents RG-45/80/Y6.4
Index, The (Student Yearbook) (1870-2005) [ dingbatView online ]
RG-45/00/I5
see also Duplicate Collection-The Index (1870-2005) RG-99/7
Index, The–Yearbook Photo Collection (1980s, 1994-1997)
RG-148
Indian, American, Student Association (1988- )
RG-45/40/I6
Indian, Asian, Association (1973-1995)
RG-45/40/I5
Individual Members of Faculty and Staff
see Faculty and Staff–Individual members RG-40/11
Individual Trustees
see Trustees, Individual RG-2/3
Industrial Engineering Department
RG-25/I4
Industrial Relations and Regional Development, Office of
see Office of Industrial Relations and Regional Development (1987- ) RG-4/10
Industry Research on Polymers, Center for University of Massachusetts
see Center for University of Massachusetts Industry Research on Polymers (CUMIRP) RG-25/P7.5
Industry/University Center In Process Design and Control
see Chemical Engineering Department–Industry/University Center In Process Design and Control (1985- ) RG-25/C2/3
Informal Chat With Non-Professional Women, An (Everywoman’s Center) (1972)
RG-7/2/00
Information and Advising Center, College of Arts and Sciences
see College of Arts and Sciences Information and Advising Center (CASIAC) RG-11/5
Information Booklets
seeCatalogs(Bulletin Series), General Information Bulletins
see also Handouts RG-30/00/2
Information Data Bank (IDB)
RG-30/2/4
Information Processing (Library) (1975, 1978)
RG-8/4/4
Information Scanning Unit, Massachusetts (MISU)
see Massachusetts Information Scanning Unit (MISU) RG-12/13
Information Science, Computer and
see Computer and Information Science RG-25/C9
Information Systems, University
see Associate Vice Chancellor for Computing and Information Systems RG-6/5
Information Systems
see Data Processing Center (DPC) RG-35/7
Information Technology and Dispute Resolution, Center for
see Center for Information Technology and Dispute Resolution (CITDR) (2001- ) RG-25/L7.5
Information Technology Services
see UMass Information Technology Services RG-35/7
Initiating Career Achievement Networks
see Project I Can (1992-1994) RG-11/8/1
Inkhorne
see Ynkhorne, The (1926-1927) RG-45/00/Y5
Innovations in Education–Film Lecture Series (1968)
RG-13/3/10
Inquiry Program (School of Education) (1977- )
RG-13/4/2/1
see also Project 10, Inquiry Program RG-32/5
Isenberg School of Management, Eugene M. and Ronnie F.
see School of Management RG-12
Insights (President’s Office) (1973-1974)
RG-3/00/I5
Insights (University Internship Program Newsletter)
RG-11/6
Insignia, Diploma, Motto, Mascot, Mace, etc. (1870- )
RG-1/6
Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (IASH) (1981-1998)
RG-6/19
Institute for Atlantic Studies
see Freiburg Program RG-25/F8
Institute for Governmental Services (IGS), Donahue
RG-3/8
Institute for Labor Affairs
RG-3/9
Institute for Man and His Environment
see The Environmental Institute (TEI) RG-6/4/14
Institute for North American Trade and Economics
see North American Trade and Economics, Institute for RG-25/N6
Institute of Food Technologists (1950)
RG-45/40/I5.2
Institutes, Academic
see Academic Departments, Programs, Institutes, Centers RG-25
Institutes and Centers
see Centers and Institutes, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1985- ) RG-40/2/A3
Institutional Research and Planning
see Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Institutional Studies
RG-4/3
see also Office of Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/1
Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
Office of Institutional Research (OIP) RG-4/3/5
Instruction (Official University Committee) (1910)
RG-40/2/I5
Instructional Applications of Computers (School of Education)
RG-13/3/23/5
Instructional Leadership, Division of (School of Education)
RG-13/4/3
Instructional Resources and Improvement, Center for
see Center for Instructional Resources and Improvement (CIRI) (1964-1978) RG-6/18
Instructional Technology News (Computer Center) (1993)
RG-29/00/5
Integrated Day, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/23/2
Integrated Pest Management Program (IPM) (1988- )
RG-15/8.6
Integrated Sciences Building (2006- )
RG-36/101
Intellectual Property, Director of Commercial Ventures
see Commercial Ventures and Intellectual Property, Director of RG-9/6
Inter Action, UMass
see UMass InterAction (President’s Office Publication) (1994- ) RG-3/00
Inter-Campus Committees (2-Campus and 3-Campus)
RG-3/100
Inter-Campus Committees (5-Campus) (1991- )
RG-3/105
Intercollegiate Daily News (Student Publication) (1933-1934)
RG-45/00/I6
Intercom
see Class of 1916–Intercom RG-50/6
Interdepartmental Program in Film Studies
RG-25/I6
Interdepartmental Program in Film Studies Newsletter(1992-1993)
RG-25/I6
Inter-Library Loan (Library) (1959- )
RG-8/3/4
Inter-Religious Project (Religious Groups) (1997- )
RG-45/70/I5
Intern Evaluation, ad hoc Committee (Faculty Senate, 1969, 1974-1976)
RG-40/2/A3
International Agricultural Studies, Center for (College of Food and Natural Resources)
RG-15/4
International Area Studies (1971- )
RG-6/4/10
International Area Studies Newsletters (1976-1982, 1986-1987)
RG-6/4/10
International Brotherhood of Police Officers (NAGE)
RG-40/5/P6
International Club (Student) (1962-1991)
RG-45/40/I5.3
International Club Newsletter (1965-1968)
RG-45/40/I5.3
International Education, Center for (School of Education) (1967- )
RG-13/3/19/5 and RG-13/4/2/4
International Education, Center for–Technical Reports (1970′s)
RG-13/3/19/5
International Forum
see The Five College International Forum RG-60/5/00
International Fund Newsletter
see International Fund–UMass Around the Globe RG-39/9
International Fund, The (University Relations and Development) (1992- )
RG-39/9
International Newsletter (Academic Affairs) (1974-1976)
RG-6/4/9
International Programs (1967- )
RG-6/4/9
see also Foreign Students advisor/office RG-6/4/12
International Center, William Smith Clark (Building) RG-36/101
International Studies
see International Area Studies RG-6/4/10
Internships (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/4/5
Internships, Office of
see University Internships Program, The (College of Arts and Science) RG-11/6
Internships (Research and Graduate Studies) RG-9/4/5
Interpreter’s Studies Program
RG-25/I7
Interpreter’s Studies Program–Translation Center
RG-25/I7/3
Inter-Religious Project (1997- )
RG-45/70/I5
Intramural and Recreation Sports (Photographs) (1969-1989)
RG-141/1
Intramurals
see Athletic Department RG-18/2
Investigating Attorney, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1969)
RG-40/2/A3
Iota Phi Theta (1987)
RG-45/90/I6
IPM
seeIntegrated Pest Management Program (IPM) RG-15/8.6
Isle of View
see Campus Pond and Isle of View (Physical Plant) RG-36/104/P6
Israel, Student Alliance for
see Student Alliance for Israel (1982) RG-40/80/S7.9
Italian Department
see French and Italian Department RG-25/F9

J

Jackie Robinson Initiative (Dept. of Political Science) (1994-1997)
RG-25/P6.7
January Break, ad hoc Committee for Study of (Faculty Senate, 1976)
RG-40/2/A3
Japan America Club (1990-1995)
RG-45/40/J3
Jewish Affairs, Office of (1994- )
RG-30/1/1/1
Jewish Awareness/Anti-Semitism Task Force (1984- )
see Civility in Human Relations, Commission on RG-40/2/C3
Jewish Caucus (1984-1993)
RG-45/40/J4
Jewish Faculty Professional Group (1980)
RG-40/3/J4
Jewish Student Union (2000- )
RG-45/40/J5
Jewish Studies, Center for
see Center for Jewish Studies (CJS) RG-25/J8.5
JOE
see Juvenile Opportunities Extension (JOE) (Social Action Group) RG-45/80/J8
Joint Committees of Faculty Senate and either or both Student Senates
RG-40/4
Joint Study Committee (Faculty Senate, 1965-1967)
RG-40/2/A3
Joint Town-University Task Force on North Pleasant Street
see North Pleasant Street, Joint Town-University Task Force (1968- ) RG-36/104/N6
Journalism Connection (1986-1987)
RG-25/E3/00
Journalism Department
see English Department–Journalism RG-25/E3
Journalistic Studies
see RG-25/E3 English Department–Journalism
Judaic Studies [Program and Committee] RG-25/J8
Judaic Studies News (1982-1988, 1996-1999)
RG-25/J8/00
Judiciary (Student Senate, Student Government Association-SGA)
RG-45/1/2
see also Attorney: Legal Services Office (LSO) RG-45/2
Judo, Men’s
see Sport-Men’s judo (1965) RG-18/2
Juggling Club (1988- )
RG-45/40/J8
Junior Extension Series
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Junior Extension Series (1919-1934) RG-15/8
Juvenile Justice Program (School of Education)
RG-13/3/15/4
Juvenile Opportunities Extension (JOE) (Social Action Group) (1973-1974)
RG-45/80/J8
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