Results for: “Rubbings” (5 collections)SCUA

Association for Gravestone Studies

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Association for Gravestone Studies Book Collection, 1812-2005.

269 items (14 linear feet).
Call no.: RB 004

Founded in 1977, the Association for Gravestone Studies (AGS) is an international organization dedicated to furthering the study and preservation of gravestones. Based in Greenfield, Mass., the Association promotes the study of gravestones from historical and artistic perspectives. To raise public awareness about the significance of historic gravemarkers and the issues surrounding their preservation, the AGS sponsors conferences and workshops, publishes both a quarterly newsletter and annual journal, Markers, and has built an archive of collections documenting gravestones and the memorial industry.

The AGS Books Collection contains scarce, out of print, and rare printed works on cemeteries and graveyards, epitaphs and inscriptions, and gravemarkers, with an emphasis on North America. The collection is divided into two series: Series 1 (Monographs and Offprints) and Series 2 (Theses and Dissertations).

Subjects

  • Cemeteries
  • Epitaphs
  • Sepulchral monuments

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies

Bunton, Alice Bice

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Alice Bice Bunton Collection, 1979-1993.

1 box (1 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 018
Timothy Lindall, Salem, Mass., 1699
Timothy Lindall, Salem, Mass., 1699

A local historian from Bethany, Connecticut, Alice Bice Bunton (1924-2000) was a long-time member of the Association for Gravestone Studies. Author of a book on the historic houses of Bethany in 1972, she attended AGS conferences regularly beginning in the late 1970s. Bunton died on October 18, 2000, at the age of 75.

Many of Bunton’s photographs documenting cemeteries in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Jersey were taken during tours associated with the AGS annual conferences. Also included in the collection are AGS conference brochures and other printed material, newspaper clippings, grave rubbings, and a small amount of correspondence.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Connecticut
  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts
  • Sepulchral monuments--New Jersey
  • Stone carving--Connecticut
  • Stone carving--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Bunton Alice Bice

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Rubbings

Cornish, Michael

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Michael Cornish Photograph Collection, ca.1975-2005.

20 boxes (20.5 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 035

Michael Cornish first became interested in gravemarkers while writing a senior thesis at the Massachusetts College of Art, and since that time, he has prepared numerous exhibitions of his photographic work and conducted important research on colonial markers. Widely known for his work on the carver Joseph Barbur of West Medway, Mass., and a group of “tendril carvers” in southeastern Massachusetts, Cornish speaks frequently to historical societies around Massachusetts, delivering slide shows tailored to the particular area. An inventory photographer for the City of Boston’s Historic Burying Ground Initiative, he has also consulted for several towns regarding the preservation and rehabilitation of their burying grounds. As a member of the AGS Board of Directors, Cornish has worked in various capacities and played an active role in organizing and participating in the annual conventions, programs, exhibits, and tours.

The Cornish Collection includes many thousands of photographs and direct rubbings of early New England gravestones, primarily in Massachusetts and Connecticut, focusing on their beauty and artistic merit. Originally inspired by the work of Harriette Merrifield Forbes, and encouraged by Dan and Jessie Farber, Cornish photographed in a variety of formats, including Kodachrome transparencies, black-and-white negatives, and black-and-white prints. The collection also includes research notes relating to his work on Barbur and other stonecarvers.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Connecticut
  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts
  • Stone carving--Connecticut
  • Stone carving--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Cornish, Michael

Types of material

  • Photographs

Duane, Edward H.

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Edward H. Duane Collection, 1967-1992.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 029

While working as caretaker for veterans’ graves in 1966, Edward H. Duane became concerned about the deterioration he saw affecting the older tombstones. A resident of Leicester and (after 1968) Paxton, Mass., Duane was employed for many years as a shipper for companies in nearby Worcester, but preserving the information on tombstones became his calling. Over the following years, he made hundreds of rubbings of New England tombstones, teaching the technique at workshops and classes throughout the region. Among other works, he was author of The Old Burial Ground, Rutland, Mass., 1717-1888 (1983).

The Duane Collection contains an array of materials used by Edward Duane in his stone rubbing workshops in the 1970s and 1980s, along with newsclippings and short publications on New England gravestones and gravestone preservation. Among other items is an early essay of his, “Old New England Headstone, 1668-1815″ (1967), accompanied by related correspondence from Allan Ludwig.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Duane, Edward H

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Rubbings

Stanze Monument Company

Stanze Monument Company Records, ca. 1921-1970.

7 boxes, 13 drawers
Call no.: MS 734
Stanze Monument Co. drawing
Stanze Monument Co. drawing

Established in 1921 in St. Louis Missouri, the Stanze Monument Company was family-owned and operated until it was sold in the mid-1980s. The company custom-cut gravestones for more than sixty years and was one of the last monument companies to cut gravestones by hand.

The collection consists of gravestone, monument, and mausoleum technical and architectural drawings. Most of the tracings and drawings of headstone patterns were used to make glass molds for sand-blasting granite headstones, while the rubbings represent reproductions of designs and font sizes and styles. Some of the architectural drawings depict conceptual plans for a typical forty-acre cemetery. The drawings were transferred from the Kibbe Hancock Heritage Museum in Illinois; a small portion of the materials were identified as being part of the “Gustafson Collection.”

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Design

Contributors

  • Stanze Monument Company

Types of material

  • Architectural drawings (Visual works)
  • Technical drawings
Special Collections and University Archives logo