Results for: “Mann, Horace, 1844-1868” (84 collections)SCUA

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Denslow, William Wallace, 1826-1868

William Wallace Denslow Botanical Manuscripts Collection, 1864-1868.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 064

A druggist by training, William Denslow became interested in botany as a means of combating tuberculosis through outdoor exercise. As his interests developed, Denslow amassed an herbarium that included between 11,000 and 15,000 specimens, including both American and European species.

The Denslow collection consists of a single volume of manuscripts, chiefly letters, collected from significant botanists and other individuals, including William Henry Brewer, Mordecai Cubitt Cooke, Asa Gray, Isaac Hollister Hall, Thomas P. James, Horace Mann, Edward Sylvester Morse, Charles Horton Peck, George Edward Post, Frederick Ward Putnam, George Thurber, and John Torrey.

Subjects

  • Botanists--Correspondence
  • Botany--History--19th century--Sources

Contributors

  • Brewer, William Henry, 1828-1910
  • Cooke, M. C. (Mordecai Cubitt), b. 1825
  • Denslow, William Wallace, 1826-1868
  • Gray, Asa, 1810-1888
  • Hall, Isaac H. (Isaac Hollister), 1837-1896
  • James, Thomas Potts, 1803-1882
  • Mann, Horace, 1844-1868
  • Morse, Edward Sylvester, 1838-1925
  • Peck, Charles H. (Charles Horton), 1833-1917
  • Post, George E. (George Edward), 1838-1909
  • Putnam, F. W. (Frederic Ward), 1839-1915
  • Thurber, George, 1821-1890
  • Torrey, John, 1796-1873

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Horace Mann Bond Project

In the fall 2012, SCUA embarked on a project to digitize the complete papers of Horace Mann Bond and make them available through our digital repository Credo. Thanks to generous funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission and the equally generous support of the Bond family, we will scan approximately 97,000 individual pages and 550 photographs, with the end of the project expected in May 2013.

98,763 scans done: Project complete!

For most contemporary archival projects, the watchword is cost efficiency: finding novel ways to reduce expenses in mass digitization projects without impairing the ability of researchers to discover what they need. In a few critical regards, the approach we adopted in digitizing the Bond Papers differs from the approach we took in digitizing the papers of W.E.B. Du Bois. In both projects, we will digitize every letter, every essay, speech, photograph, and poem — every item — however in the Du Bois Papers, each discrete item was cataloged separately, while for Bond, we cataloged only at the folder level and we used the existing finding aid as the basis for our catalog records. Cataloging (metadata production, in archivist speak) is by far the most expensive part of any digitization project, often accounting for two-thirds of total expenditures, so reusing the information we have on hand rather than recreating it from scratch has the potential to drive down costs substantially.

Horace Mann Bond, 1930
Horace Mann Bond, 1930

In theory, however, the differences between the item-level approach of Du Bois and the folder-level approach for Bond may be significant. With Du Bois, researchers will have a far more fine-grained experience: items are described individually, with full descriptive detail, subject headings, and information such as the place where the letter was written, the specific date, and so forth. For Bond, researchers should be able to locate potentially relevant folders with ease, but subject access for the items within the folder is decidedly less refined, and given that a single folder can contain up to 30 pages of material that may vary in date, location, or other details, some information may not be possible to extract without close inspection.

Our approach to Bond, then, is a calculated compromise in which we have seized the opportunity to provide access to an historically valuable archive quickly and efficiently, although we expect that this will place a higher burden on researchers. During the summer 2013, we will conduct a study of the impact of the different strategies used to digitize Du Bois and Bond and try to assess how much researchers may be affected. If there is a happy medium, we hope to find it.

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African American history

Founders of the Niagara Movement, ca.1905
Founders of the Niagara Movement,
ca.1905

The acquisition of the papers of W.E.B. Du Bois in 1972 established SCUA as a center for research in African American history. In subsequent years, the University of Massachusetts has supported the publication of three volumes of Dr. Du Bois’ correspondence and SCUA has served as a resource for many dozens of scholarly articles and books on Du Bois and his legacy. SCUA has also made efforts to build around the Du Bois collection, adding other important printed and manuscript materials both in African American history and in the history of efforts to promote social change.

Beyond Du Bois, significant collections in African American history include the papers of the abolitionist Hudson Family of Northampton, the expatriate playwright Gordon Heath, the sociologist, educator, and former president of Lincoln University, Horace Mann Bond.

Each February, in commemoration of Dr. Du Bois’s birthday, SCUA and the Du Bois Department of Afro-Americans Studies at UMass co-sponsor a colloquium on Du Bois and his legacy. Our lecturers have included distinguished scholars such as Herbert Aptheker, Randolph Bromery, Clayborne Carson, and David Levering Lewis.

Significant collections

Antislavery

Antislavery Collection, 1725-1911.

(7.5 linear feet).
Call no.: Rare Book Collections

The Antislavery Collection contains several hundred printed pamphlets and books pertaining to slavery and antislavery in New England, 1725-1911. The holdings include speeches, sermons, proceedings and other publications of organizations such as the American Anti-Slavery Society and the American Colonization Society, and a small number of pro-slavery tracts.

Subjects

  • Abolitionists--Massachusetts
  • Antislavery movements--United States
  • Slavery--United States

Contributors

  • American Anti-Slavery Society
  • American Colonization Society

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 3/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Concordance for the Archives, B

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

B

Baccalaureate Day
see Press Information (Commencement) RG-1/7/1
Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration (BDIC)
RG-11/4
Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration Newsletter (1973- )
RG-11/4
Baha’i Club (Religious Club) (1972-1997)
RG-45/70/B3
Bands (Music and Dance Department)
RG-25/M9.2
Banqueteer, Aggie
see Aggie Banqueteer RG-45/00/A2
Baseball (Men’s)
see Sports-Men’s Baseball (1868- ) RG-18/2
Basketball (Men’s)
see Sports-Men’s Basketball (1898- ) RG-18/2
Basketball (Women’s)
see Sports-Women’s Basketball (1978- ) RG-18/2
Bathrooms, Coed (Physical Plant) (1981)
RG-36/50/B3
see also Office of Residential Resource Management RG-30/21/1
Baton Twirling
see Sports-Women’s Baton Twirling (1973) RG-18/2
Bay State Ruralist (1912-1917)
RG-45/00/B2
BCC
see Boston Church of Christ (1990- ) (Religious Group) RG-45/70/B6
BCP
see Bilingual Collegiate Program (BCP) (1974- ) RG-6/4/6.5
BDIC
see Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration (BDIC) (College of Arts and Sciences) RG-11/4
BDIC Newsletter (1973-1987)
RG-11/4
Beacon (1970- )
RG-13/00
Beautification Committee, Campus
see Campus Beautification Committee RG-40/2/C.6
Beef and Sheep Highlights (Extension Service, Cooperative) (1958, 1967-1975)
RG-15/8
see also Sheep Shearing (1947, 1954-1955) RG-15/8
Behavior Program, Neuroscience and
see Neuroscience and Behavior Program RG-25/N5
Behavioral Biology, Department of
see Psychology–Behavioral Biology, Dept. of RG-25/P8
Behavioral Sciences Faculty
see Social and Behavioral Sciences Faculty RG-11/30
Berkshire County Cooperative Extension (1915-1989)
RG-15/8/.81
Beta Alpha Psi (Honor Society)
see Accounting Department–Beta Alpha Psi RG-25/A2
Beta Gamma Sigma
RG-45/60/B2.5
Beta Kappa Phi (1985-1996)
RG-45/90/B4
Beta Theta of Sigma Gamma Epsilon
see Sigma Gamma Epsilon (1949- ) RG-45/90/S5.35
Bibliofile, The (1987, 1994)
RG-45/00/B4
Bibliography, Faculty/Staff
see Faculty/Staff Bibliography (collective) RG-40/4
Bibliography Library Collections
see Collection Development (Library) RG-8/2
Bibliography, Organization Charts (University as a Whole) (1949- )
RG-1/00/1
Bicentennial Committee
see Inter-Campus Committee RG-3/100
Bi-Cultural Education
see Bi-Lingual, Bi-Cultural Education, Center for RG-13/3/21/6
Biff, The Weekly
see Weekly Biff, The (1910) RG-45/00/W4
Bilingual Collegiate Program (BCP) (1974- )
RG-6/4/6.5
Bilingual Collegiate Program–Springfield/UMass Minority Achievement Program (SUMMA)
RG-6/4/6.5
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (1991)
RG-25/B5
Biodiversity Conservation Program (1990)
RG-25/F6/3
Biographies (Alumni)
see Obituaries, Biographies (Alumni) RG-50/00/2
Biography, Lists, Directories, Faculty/Staff
see Faculty/Staff Biography, Lists, Directories (collective) RG-40/10
see also Individual Members of Faculty and Staff RG-40/11
Biological Hazards Committee (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/1/2/4
Biological Sciences Library (1962- )
RG-8/3/9
Biology
RG-25/B6
see also Zoology Department RG-25/Z5
Botany Department RG-25/B8
Biology, Plant
see Plant Biology RG-25/P4.5
Biomedical Research Support Grants
see Faculty Research Grant, Biomedical Research Support Grant (F RG/BS RG) (Research and Graduate Studies) RG-9/2/3
Biopharmaceutical Research Unit
see Public Health, Division of–Biopharmaceutical Research Unit RG-17/1
BIOrhythms (1997- )
RG-25/B6/00
Biosci Journal (1995- )
RG-25/B6/00
Note: A journal of undergraduate research at UMass/Amherst.
Biostatistics Technical Reports (1977)
see Public Health, Division of–Biostatistics Technical Reports
RG-17/1
Biotechnology Program
RG-25/B7
Biotechnology Program Committee (1985- )
RG-40/2/B5
Bisexual Concerns
see Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Concerns, The Chancellors Task Force on (1993- ) RG-40/2/G2
Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Concerns, Support Group for RG-40/2/G3
Programs for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Concerns RG-30/2/6
Bits and Bytes (1965-1989)
RG-29/00/1
Black and other Minority Students, Committee for the Collegiate Education of
see Committee for the Collegiate Education of Black and other Minority Students (CCEBMS) (1967- ) RG-6/4/12
Black Culture Center (New Africa House)
RG-30/26
Black Mass Communications Project (BMCP) (1968- )
RG-45/30/B4
Black Repertory Theatre
RG-25/T3.6
Black Student Union
RG-45/19
Black Students at UMass and in Western Massachusetts
RG-45/15
see also Protests and Demonstrations RG-45/101
Student Life RG-1/204
New Africa House RG-36/100
Lecturers from outside the University RG-1/12
Black Studies, Contributions to
see Contributions to Black Studies RG-60/5/00
Black Studies Program
see Afro-American Studies, W.E.B. Du Bois Dept. of RG-25/A4
see also Five College Cooperation RG-60/5
Five College Black Studies RG-60/5/3
Blue Prints (Cartographic Materials)
RG-181/1
Blues Band (1985- )
RG-45/40/B4
BMCP
see Black Mass Communications Project (BMCP) (1968- ) RG-45/30/B4
Board of Control Annual Report (Experiment Station) (1888, 1893, 1894)
see Experiment Station (State Station, 1882-1895)–Board of Control Annual Report (1888, 1893, 1894) RG-15/2.1
Board of Control Meetings (Experiment Station) (1882-1895)
see Experiment Station (State Station, 1882-1895)–Board of Control Meetings (1882-1895) RG-15/2.1
Board of Governors
RG-37/11
Board of Higher Education (1996- )
see Higher Education Coordinating Council (1991-1996) RG-1/5
Board of Higher Education, Massachusetts
see Massachusetts Board of Higher Education RG-1/3
Board of Regents (1980-1991)
RG-1/4
see also Massachusetts Board of Higher Education RG-1/3
Higher Education Coordinating Council RG-1/5
Board of Trustees
see Trustees RG-2
Board of Trustees, Faculty Delegate to the
see Faculty to the Board of Trustees (Faculty Senate, 1971-1972) RG-40/2/A3
Boarding Club, MAC (1884)
RG-45/40/B6.2
Bologna, UMass Program at
see French and Italian Department–Bologna, UMASS Program at RG-25/F9/3
Boltwood Project (Social Action Group) (1983- )
RG-45/80/B6
see also Belchertown State School Friends Association (BSSFA) MS302
Bond Center for Equal Education
see Horace Mann Bond Center for Equal Education RG-13/4/10
see also Status Report–Reports to Chancellor (1982) RG-4/00
Book Club, MAC (1908-1925)
RG-45/40/B6.4
Book for Little Loving Children Needing Guidance (1+1=/=3) (1973)
RG-45/00/B6
Books for College Libraries (Library) (1967-1974)
RG-8/4/2
Boston Church of Christ (BCC) (Religious Group) (1990-1993)
RG-45/70/B6
Boston Library Consortium (1975- )
RG-8/10
Boston, UMass
see UMass Boston (1964- ) RG-55/3
Boston University Combined Degree, Granting with UMass and Simmons College
RG-60/4
Botanic Garden (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/B6
Botany
RG-25/B8
Botany News (1981-1988)
RG-25/B8/00
Bowl Team, College
see College Bowl Team RG-45/40/C5
Boys’ and Girls’ Series (Extension Service, Cooperative)
see
Extension Service, Cooperative–Boys’ and Girls’ Series RG-15/8
Brain Theory Newsletter (1978)
RG-25/C9/00
Broadcast Board, Student Publications and
see Publications and Broadcast Board, Student RG-45/30/P8
Brochures (Public Affairs)
RG-5/00/4
BRSG
see Faculty Research Grant–Biomedical Research Support Grant (F RG-BRSG) RG-9/2/3
Budget
see Budget Documents RG-4/2
Office of Budget and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Capital Outlay Budgets and Priorities Lists RG-6/15/4
Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance RG-35/19
Budget and Finance
RG-32/6
Budget and Finance, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1980-1981)
RG-40/2/A3
Budget Committee (Faculty Senate, 1969-1973)
RG-40/2/A3
see also Program and Budget Committee (1975- ) RG-40/2/A3
Budget Committee (Student Senate) (1981-1993)
RG-45/7/B8
Budget Documents (1908- )
RG-4/2
Budget Office (Administrative Services)
RG-35/20
see also Budget Documents–Newsclippings RG-4/2
see also Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Budgeting and Institutional Research
see Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Budgeting and Institutional Studies, Office of
see Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Budgeting, Institutional Research and Planning
seeOffice of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Budgets, Capital Outlay
see Planning Office RG-6/15/4
Building Association
RG-36/22
Building Authority
RG-36/21
see also Financial Reports RG-3/4/3
Building Materials Technology and Management Program
RG-25/B9
Building Ventilation Working Group, Campus
see Campus Building Ventilation Working Group RG-30/15/1
Buildings and Grounds
RG-36
see also Buildings and Grounds (Photographs) RG-150
Panoramic Photos RG-170
Buildings and Grounds (Photographs)
RG-150
see also Panoramic Photos RG-170
Buildings and Grounds, Campus (Films and Videotapes)
see Campus Buildings and Grounds (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/4
Buildings and Grounds Committee (Faculty Senate, 1968-1969, 1980)
RG-40/2/A3
Buildings or parts of campus, specific
see Specific buildings or parts of campus RG-101 thru 104
Buildings Proposed But Not Built
RG-36/103
Buildings, Residential
see Residential Buildings RG-36/102
Buildings Specific (except residential)
RG-36/101
see also Residential Buildings RG-36/102
Buildings proposed but not built RG-36/103
Bulletin Series
see Catalogs (Bulletin Series) (1901- ) RG-1/00/4
Bulletin, University (Catalog Series)
see RG-1/00/4 Catalogs (Bulletin Series ) (1901- ), General Information Bulletins (1898-1978)
Bulletins
see Weekly, University, Executive Bulletins RG-5/00/3
Bulletins, Alumni
see Alumni Bulletins RG-50/00/3
Bulletins, Experiment Stations
seeExperiment Station (1882-95)–Bulletin (#’s 1-57) (1883-1895) RG-15/2.1
and
Experiment Station (1888- )– Bulletin (#1- ) RG-15/2.2
Bulletins, General Information
see Catalogs (Bulletin Series), General Information Bulletins RG-1/00/4
Bureau of Government Research
RG-25/P6.5
Bureau of Government Research Bulletin (1959-1969)
RG-25/P6.5/00
Bureau of Public Administration
RG-25/P6.4
Bursar
RG-35/16
Bursars Office (Microfilm)
RG-190/17
Bus Service, Student Senate
see Student Senate Bus Service RG-45/7/T7
Business Administration, School of
see School of Management RG-12
Business Affairs
see Vice President for Management and Business Affairs RG-3/11
Business Affairs–Office of (Business Manager and Staff) (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/4/1
Business Affairs, Office of (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/4
Business and Economic Report, Massachusetts
see Massachusetts Business and Economic Report RG-12/3/B8
Business and Economic Research, Center for
RG-12/3
see also Massachusetts Business and Economic Report RG-12/3/B8
Business Club
RG-12/4
Business Development Center
see Massachusetts Small Business Development Center (MSBDC) RG-12/10
Business Leadership Education, Affirmative
see Project ABLE RG-12/2
Business Office, Director of Personnel and Financial Services
RG-35/3
Business Procedures and Project Planning, Director of
RG-3/4/5
Businesses Student
see Co-ops and Businesses, Student Run RG-45/40/C6.5
ButterMeter News (1985)
RG-45/00/B8

History and Mission

Mission

Cattle judging at Mass. Agricultural College
Judging cattle at Mass. Agricultural College

To spark researchers’ imaginations and to celebrate the legacy of innovation and the activist spirit, SCUA pursues an ambitious program of collecting materials of enduring historical value and offers strong support for research and learning. Through its collections, programs, public events, and exhibitions, SCUA promotes meaningful engagement with the broad record of social change in America, innovation and entrepreneurship, and the varied histories of the people of New England and the UMass Amherst community. We embrace the university’s historic role as a center of knowledge for the people of the Commonwealth and are committed to providing free and unfettered access to our holdings for all who wish to use them, using the highest professional standards and practices and the best technologies available.

Department history

African dancers
African dancers
From the Horace Mann Bond Papers

In 1931, nearly half a century after Librarian Henry Hill Goodell first authorized the permanent retention of the official records of Massachusetts Agricultural College, the Library established a College History Collection. Documenting the activities of the administration and faculty and the life of its students, this collection grew steadily, until in 1953, the Library dedicated a room named in honor of Dean William L. Machmer to serve as the first true home of the University Archives.

The timing of Goodell’s proposal to preserve the College archives coincided roughly with the Library’s first efforts to assemble a collection of rare books to support its educational mission. Although the campus had no separate library building until 1885, the College accepted several significant gifts of books, beginning as early as 1868, when the apiarist and state Adjutant General Henry K. Oliver donated twenty scarce volumes on bee culture, followed by other donations of important works in agriculture, history, and science. By the time the library published its first catalogue in 1875, rare books were a small, but distinctive part of the collections. Among the Library’s earliest acquisitions were the first London edition of William Bartram’s Travels Through North and South Carolina (1792), François Augier de Marigny’s The History of the Arabians (London, 1758), and two early bee manuals by John Keys, The Practical Bee-Master (London, 1780) and The Antient Bee-Master’s Farewell (London, 1796) — both courtesy of Oliver. All remain part of the collections today.

David Axelrod, Class of 1965
David B. Axelrod, ca.1980, Class of 1965, poet, author of The Man who Fell in Love with His Chicken (1980)

From its initial focus on agriculture, horticulture, and the natural sciences, the Library soon extended its collections to encompass the history and culture of New England. With the acquisition of the records of the Valley Peace Center and the papers of ethnographer Jozef Obrebski in 1973, the Library began to acquire collections of personal papers and organizational records of historical significance. The rare book and manuscript collections were combined administratively with the University Archives in the early 1990s to form the current Department of Special Collections and University Archives. Today, SCUA oversees a growing research collection of primary materials that includes rare books and manuscripts, historic maps, photographs, prints, and the official records of the campus at UMass Amherst.

Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920

Benjamin Smith Lyman Papers, 1831-1921.

52 boxes (42 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 190
Benjamin Smith Lyman, 1902
Benjamin Smith Lyman, 1902

A native of Northampton, Massachusetts, Benjamin Smith Lyman was a prominent geologist and mining engineer. At the request of the Meiji government in Japan, Lyman helped introduce modern geological surveying and mining techniques during the 1870s and 1880s, and his papers from that period illuminate aspects of late nineteenth century Japan, New England, and Pennsylvania, as well as the fields of geology and mining exploration and engineering. From his earliest financial records kept as a student at Phillips Exeter Academy through the journal notations of his later days in Philadelphia, Lyman’s meticulous record-keeping provides much detail about his life and work. Correspondents include his classmate, Franklin B. Sanborn, a friend of the Concord Transcendentalists and an active social reformer, abolitionist, and editor.

The papers, 1848-1911, have been organized into nine series: correspondence, financial records, writings, survey notebooks, survey maps, photographs, student notes and notebooks, collections, and miscellaneous (total 25 linear feet). A separate Lyman collection includes over 2,000 books in Japanese and Chinese acquired by Lyman, and in Western languages pertaining to Asia.

Subjects

  • Geological surveys--Alabama
  • Geological surveys--Illinois
  • Geological surveys--India--Punjab
  • Geological surveys--Japan
  • Geological surveys--Japan--Maps
  • Geological surveys--Maryland
  • Geological surveys--Nova Scotia
  • Geological surveys--Pennsylvania
  • Geological surveys--Pennsylvania--Maps
  • Geologists--United States
  • Geology--Equipment and supplies--Catalogs
  • Geology--Japan--History--19th century
  • Japan--Description and travel--19th century
  • Japan--Maps
  • Japan--Photographs
  • Japan--Social life and customs--1868-1912
  • Mining engineering--Equipment and supplies--Catalogs
  • Mining engineering--Japan--History--19th century
  • Mining engineers--United States

Contributors

  • Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920
  • Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Book jackets
  • Field notes
  • Letterpress copybooks
  • Maps
  • Notebooks
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Trade catalogs

Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Kenyon Leech Butterfield Papers, 1889-1945.

(12 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 3/1 B88
Kenyon L. Butterfield
Kenyon L. Butterfield

An agricultural and educational reformer born in 1868, Kenyon Butterfield was the ninth president of Massachusetts Agricultural College and one of the university’s most important figures. An 1891 graduate of Michigan Agricultural College and recipient of MA in Economics and Rural Sociology from the University of Michigan (1902), Butterfield entered university administration early in his career, becoming President of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1903 and, only three years later, of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Possessed of a Progressive spirit, Butterfield revolutionized the college during his 18 years in Amherst, expanding and diversifying the curriculum, quadrupling the institutional budget, fostering a dramatic increase in the presence of women on campus and expanding the curriculum, and above all, helping to promote the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and developing the Cooperative Extension Service into a vital asset to the Commonwealth. Nationally, he maintained a leadership role in the field of rural sociology and among Land Grant University presidents. After leaving Amherst in 1924, Butterfield served as President at Michigan Agricultural College for four years and was active in missionary endeavors in Asia before retiring. He died at his home in Amherst on Nov. 25, 1936.

The Butterfield Papers contain biographical materials, administrative and official papers of both of his presidencies, typescripts of his talks, and copies of his published writings. Includes correspondence and memoranda (with students, officials, legislators, officers of organizations, and private individuals), reports, outlines, minutes, surveys, and internal memoranda.

Subjects

  • Agricultural education--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural education--Michigan--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--United States--History--Sources
  • Agriculture--United States--History--Sources
  • Education--United States--History--Sources
  • Food supply--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Higher education and state--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty
  • Michigan Agricultural College--History
  • Michigan Agricultural College. President
  • Rural churches--United States--History--Sources
  • Rural development--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Women--Education (Higher)--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • World War, 1914-1918

Contributors

  • Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
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  10. 9
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