Search results for '“Labor unions--Organizing--United States--History--20th century”' (page 3 of 90) • SCUA • UMass Amherst Libraries
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University of Massachusetts Amherst. Students

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Student Body, 1867-2007.

(155 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 045

Since the arrival of the first class of students at Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1867, the student body at UMass has grown to over 20,500 undergraduates and nearly 6,000 graduate students.

Record Group 45 includes the collected records of student activities at UMass Amherst, from student publications and organizations (fraternities and sororities, unions, and honorary societies) to records of student government, student protests, and religious and social groups. Also included are class notes and correspondence of some individual students while enrolled in the University.

Connect to another siteA number of student publications have been digitized and are indexed in YouMass.

Subjects

  • Aggie Life
  • Bay State Ruralist
  • College Signal
  • College students--Massachusetts
  • Greek letter societies--Massachusetts
  • Student newspapers and periodicals--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Students

Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873

Finding aid

Henry James Clark Papers, 1865-1872.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 048
Trichodina pediculus
Trichodina pediculus

The first professor of Natural History at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, Henry James Clark, had one of the briefest and most tragic tenures of any member of the faculty during the nineteenth century. Having studied under Asa Gray and Louis Agassiz at Harvard, Clark became an expert microscopist and student of the structure and development of flagellate protozoans and sponges. Barely a year after joining the faculty at Massachusetts Agricultural College at its first professor of Natural History, Clark died of tuberculosis on July 1, 1873.

A small remnant of a brief, but important career in the natural sciences, the Henry James Clark Papers consist largely of obituary notices and a fraction of his published works. The three manuscript items include two letters from Clark’s widow to his obituarist and fellow naturalist, Alpheus Hyatt (one including some minor personal memories), and a contract to build a house on Pleasant Street in Amherst.

Subjects

  • Developmental biology
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Veterinary Science
  • Protozoans

Contributors

  • Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873
  • Clark, Mary Young Holbrook
  • Hyatt, Alpheus, 1838-1902

Types of material

  • Contracts
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Mission and history

Mission

Cattle judging at Mass. Agricultural College
Judging cattle at Mass. Agricultural College

A steward of the past for generations to come, SCUA inspires discovery and advances scholarship through astute curation of cultural heritage materials. As part of a community dedicated to the values of diversity, social equity, and positive social change, SCUA acts through its collections, programs, and exhibitions to promote free inquiry, the production of knowledge, and joy in learning.

Department history

African dancers
African dancers
From the Horace Mann Bond Papers

In 1931, nearly half a century after Librarian Henry Hill Goodell first authorized the permanent retention of the official records of Massachusetts Agricultural College, the Library established a College History Collection. As the official record of the activities of the university’s administrators and faculty and a reflection of the life of its students, this collection grew steadily, until in 1953, the Library dedicated a room named in honor of Dean William L. Machmer to serve as the first true home of the University Archives.

Goodell’s initiative to assemble the College archives coincided roughly with the Library’s first efforts to build a collection of rare books to support its educational mission. Although the College had no separate library until 1885, its administrators nevertheless accepted several significant gifts of books, beginning with the 1868 donation of twenty scarce volumes on bee culture from the apiculturist and state Adjutant General Henry K. Oliver. By the time the library published its first catalog in 1875, rare books formed a small, but notable part of the collections, focused on the primary academic interests of the early college: agriculture, horticulture and botany, and the natural sciences. Among the Library’s earliest acquisitions were the first London edition of William Bartram’s Travels Through North and South Carolina (1792), François Augier de Marigny’s The History of the Arabians (London, 1758), and early bee manuals by John Keys, The Practical Bee-Master (London, 1780) and The Antient Bee-Master’s Farewell (London, 1796) — both courtesy of Oliver. All remain part of the collections today.

David Axelrod, Class of 1965
David B. Axelrod, ca.1980, Class of 1965, poet, author of The Man who Fell in Love with His Chicken (1980)

From these beginnings, the collections of rare books and manuscripts have evolved in concert with the evolution of the university and its academic programs. With the acquisition of the records of the Valley Peace Center and the papers of ethnographer Jozef Obrebski in 1973, the Library began to acquire collections of personal papers and organizational records of historical significance, and the arrival of the papers on W.E.B. Du Bois in that same year marked a turning point. The rare book and manuscript collections were combined administratively with the University Archives in the early 1990s to form the current Department of Special Collections and University Archives.

SCUA’s initial foray online came with a simple page on the library’s website in 1997, but by 2007, evolved into the UMarmot project, one of the earliest efforts to use freely-available software to create a comprehensive online archival catalog. SCUA launched its online digital repository, Credo in 2011, thanks to generous support from the Verizon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Historic Publications and Records Commission. The papers of W.E.B. Du Bois led SCUA’s way into the digital realm, followed by the papers of Horace Mann Bond, and then dozens of of other collections.

Mile markers

Each of the library’s million-volume milestones has been celebrated by the addition of a special volume to SCUA’s collections:

One millionth volume:
Jonathan Edwards, A careful and strict enquiry into the modern prevailing notions of that freedom of will; which is supposed to be essential to moral agency, vertue and vice, reward and punishment, praise and blame. Boston: S. Kneeland, 1754.
SCUA’s copy of this classic theological work on Free Will from the New Light minister from Northampton belonged to Rev. John Cleaveland of Ipswich, Mass., one of the subscribers. It is signed and dated by Cleaveland in several locations.
Two millionth volume:
Phillis Wheatley, Poems on various subjects, religious and moral. London: A. Bell, 1773.
A classic of American literature written by a young woman enslaved in Boston, and the first book published by an African-American woman. Gift of Randolph W. Bromery.
Three millionth volume:
James Baldwin, Gypsy and other poems, with etched portraits by Leonard Baskin. Northampton, Mass.: Gehenna Press, 1989.
When Baldwin, a former faculty member at UMass Amherst, died unexpectedly, he was working with the great printer Leonard Baskin on a special volume of unpublished poems. Celebrating SCUA’s strengths in African American history literature and reflecting the fine-printing heritage in Massachusetts, SCUA’s copy includes a signed portfolio of etchings of Baldwin by Baskin, each signed. It is one of fifty copies bound specially by Daniel Gehnrich in leather and paste paper, made by Babette Gehnrich, over boards, and laid into a cloth traycase. Also laid in are Baskin’s proof, 1989, and touched proof, 1989, of two of the portraits. Gift of Lisa Baskin.
Four millionth volume:
The proclamation of emancipation of the President of the United States, to take effect January 1st, 1863. Boston: John Murray Forbes, 1862.
The first separate printing of the Emancipation Proclamation, this volume was printed in miniature so that Union army troops in the south could more easily distribute it.

Northampton Labor Council (AFL-CIO)

Finding aid

Northampton Labor Council Minutebooks, 1933-1985.

2 boxes (0.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 055

From its origins in 1899 as the Northampton Central Labor Union, the Northampton Labor Council coordinated political activity and worked for union cooperation in strikes, boycotts, and celebrations. With 29 unions in its ranks by 1903, it was one of the few labor councils to include both AFL and CIO affiliates during the period of their intense competition during the 1930s, however from 1945 until the AFL-CIO merger, CIO unions were excluded. By 1985, the NLC had 14 affiliated local unions.

As the coordinating body for the political and social activities of fourteen labor unions in Northampton, Massachusetts, and the surrounding area, the Labor Council generated union support for strikes, boycotts, and celebrations, and hosting annual Labor Day parades. Includes photocopies of four minutebooks, spanning the years 1933-1985.

Subjects

  • Central Labor Union (Northampton, Mass.)
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts--Northampton
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Social conditions--20th century

Contributors

  • Northampton Labor Council (AFL-CIO)

United Auto Workers. District 65 Boston University Local

Finding aid

UAW District 65 Collection, ca.1985.

1 folder (0.2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 320

The decision of clerical and technical workers at Boston University to organize with District 65 of the UAW was as rooted in the labor movement as it was in the womens movement. By the early 1970s, office workers at B.U. were dissatsified with working conditions that included — among other grievances — sexual harassment and a classification system that did not value “women’s work.” In 1979 after an intense struggle with the administration, B.U. finally recognized the union and signed their first contract.

The collection includes a printed history and videotape documenting unionization activities at Boston University’s Medical Campus.

Subjects

  • Boston University. Medical Campus
  • Collective bargaining--Professions--Massachusetts--Boston
  • Collective labor agreements--Medical personnel --Massachusetts--Boston--History
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • United Automobile, Aircraft, and Vehicle Workers of America. District 65

Types of material

  • Videotapes

United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union

United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union Local 4 Records, 1945-1995.

10 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 415

The United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union (UHCMW) was formed in 1934 by the merger of the United Hatters of North America and the Cloth Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union, settling deep rifts between the competing unions. For five decades, the UHCMW organized the declining hat and millinery trade in the United States until it merged into the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU) in 1983, which merged in 1995 into the International Ladies Garment Workers Union to form UNITE (Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees).

The collection documents UHCMW Local 4, representing workers in Boston and Framingham, from 1945 through the time of its merger into the ACTWU. The series of ledgers and documents in the collection include documents concerning health and retirement benefits for union members, bargaining agreements, and financial records for the local, as well as a small assortment of correspondence, memoranda, and minutes of meetings.

Subjects

  • Hat trade--Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • United Hatters, Cap, and Millinery Workers International Union

Bailey, Ebenezer

Finding aid

Ebenezer Bailey Papers, 1852-1882.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 448

Ebenezer Bailey was a wholesale shoe purchaser and distributor from Massachusetts. The collection comprises just over 100 items, the bulk of which are receipts for the purchase and sale of shoes and slippers, covering the period from 1852 to 1882.

Subjects

  • Business records--Massachusetts
  • Dearborn, J. J
  • Lynn (Mass.)--History
  • Shoe industry--Massachusetts--Lynn
  • Shoe industry--New England--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Bailey, Ebenezer

Types of material

  • Receipts (Financial records)

Brinley Family

Finding aid

Brinley Family Papers, 1643-1950.

(4.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 161
Deborah Brinley and infant son Francis, 1729<br />Copy by Charles U. Bond (1830)<br />after John Smibert
Deborah Brinley and infant son Francis, 1729
Copy by Charles U. Bond (1830)
after John Smibert

A prosperous family of merchants and landowners, the Brinleys were well ensconced among the social and political elite of colonial New England. Connected by marriage to other elite families in Rhode Island and Massachusetts — the Auchmutys, Craddocks, and Tyngs among them — the Brinleys were refined, highly educated, public spirited, and most often business-minded. Although many members of the family remained loyal to the British cause during the Revolution, the family retained their high social standing in the years following.

The Brinley collection includes business letters, legal and business records, wills, a fragment of a diary, documents relating to slaves, newspaper clippings, and a small number of paintings and artifacts. A descendent, Nancy Brinley, contributed a quantity of genealogical research notes and photocopies of Brinley family documents from other repositories. Of particular note in the collection is a fine nineteenth century copy of a John Smibert portrait of Deborah Brinley (1719), an elegant silver tray passed through the generations, and is a 1713 list of the library of Francis Brinley, which offers a foreshadowing of the remarkable book collection put together in the later nineteenth century by his descendant George Brinley.

Subjects

  • American loyalists--Massachusetts
  • Book collectors--United States--History--19th century
  • Brinley family
  • Brinley, George, 1817-1875--Library
  • Businessmen--Massachusetts--History
  • Businessmen--Rhode Island--History
  • Craddock family
  • Landowners--Massachusetts--History
  • Landowners--Rhode Island--History
  • Libraries--Rhode Island--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--19th century
  • Rhode Island--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Rhode Island--Genealogy
  • Rhode Island--Politics and government--19th century
  • Slavery--United States--History
  • Tyng family
  • United Empire Loyalists

Types of material

  • Deeds
  • Realia

Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Finding aid

Judi Chamberlin Papers, ca.1970-2010.

30 boxes (45 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 768
Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Subjects

  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.

Contributors

  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center

Types of material

  • Videotapes

Concordance for the Archives, U

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

U

UAASC
see Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC) (1997- ) RG-6/7
UALRC
see United Asia Learning Resource Center RG-25/U5
U-ARTS
see Undergraduate Art Students Association (U-ARTS) RG-45/40/U5
UCC
see Computer Center RG-29
UCF
see United Christian Foundation (UCF) RG-30/12
UCS
see Computer Center RG-29
UCS Notes (Computer Center Publication) (1990)
RG-29/00/4
UES
see University of El Salvador (UES) RG-60/3
UFF
see University Fund for the Future (UFF) (1989- ) RG-50/7/1
UIS Newsletter (Data Processing Center) (1987- )
RG-35/7
UMAGRAFFITI (Student Publication)
RG-45/00/U4
UMass (News Office) (1983-1984)
RG-5/00/7
UMASS (1996- ) (News Office)
RG-5/00/12
see also Massachusetts (1990-1996) RG-5/00/11
UMASS (University Monthly Anthropological Survey Service (1982-1989)
RG-25/A6/00
UMASS 1983 and UMASS 1984 (Public Affairs)
RG-5/00/7
UMASS Alumni Connection, The
see Alumni Connection, The UMass (1992-1994) RG-50/00/3
UMass Alumni News and Views (1978-1983)
RG-50/00/3
UMass Amherst Globe, The (International Programs) (1993- )
RG-6/4/9/2
UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988)
RG-187/1
UMass Answers (Continuing Education) (1982- )
RG-7/00
UMass Around the Globe (1992- )
RG-39/9
UMass Boston
RG-55/3
UMass Boston Planning and Establishment (pre-1965)
RG-55/3/1
UMass Dartmouth
see Southeastern Massachusetts University (SMU) RG-55/5
UMass Educational Television (UMET)
RG-13/1/3
UMass Faculty and Staff for Peace and Justice in the Middle East
see Peace and Justice in the Middle East, UMass Faculty and Staff for RG-40/3/P1
UMass Greens (1989)
RG-45/80/U4
UMass Hunger Task Force
see Hunger Task Force, UMass RG-45/40/H8
UMass Information Technology Services (formerly University Information Systems)
RG-35/7
UMass Interaction (1994- )
RG-3/00
UMass Labor Council (1995- )
RG-40/5/U5
UMass Lowell
see University of Lowell RG-55/4
UMass Majors (catalog)
see CASIAC RG-11/5
see also Admissions RG-30/5
UMass News (News Office)
RG-5/3
UMass Nutrient Data Bank
see Food Science and Nutrition, Department of–Nutrient Data Bank, UMass RG-25/F5/3
UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988)
RG-187/1
UMass Peacemakers
see Peacemakers, UMass (1982-1987) RG-45/80/P4
see also Peacemakers Records (1963-1990) MS309
UMass Plato User’s Group Newsletter
see Massachusetts CAI Consortium Newsletter (1985- ) RG-29/00
UMass Program at Freiburg
see Freiburg, UMass Program at RG-25/F8
U-Mass Tenant Association (UMTA)
RG-35/12/3
UMass Worcester
see Medical School, Worcester RG-55/2
U-Math Newsletter (1981)
RG-25/M5/00
UMET
see UMass Educational Television (UMET) RG-13/1/3
UMPSO
see Pagan Association, UMass RG-45/70/P3
UMTA
see UMass Tenant Association (UMTA) RG-35/12/3
UMTC
see University of Massachusetts Transportation Center (1994- ) RG-25/U4
Undergrad, The (Business Club) (1974-1976)
RG-12/4
Undergraduate Admissions Task Force (1999- )
RG-40/2/U2
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC) (1997- )
RG-6/7
Undergraduate Art Students Association (U-ARTS) (1987)
RG-45/40/U5
Undergraduate Course of Study Committee (Faculty Senate, 1960-1963)
RG-40/2/A3
Undergraduate Curriculum Study Committee’s Project (Faculty Senate, 1996- )
RG-40/2/A3
Undergraduate Education, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Undergraduate Education, Associate (1972-1973, 1981- ) RG-6/10
Undergraduate Journal
RG-45/00/U5
Undergraduate Retention Committee (Official University Committee) (1992)
RG-40/2/U4
see also Retention Committee (1985- ) RG-40/2/R5
Unification Church of America (Religious Group) (1981-1984)
RG-45/70/U5
Union, Credit
see Credit Union RG-40/5/C7
Union of Professional Employees
see Union of Professional Employees (UPE) MS-47
Union of Student Employees (1975-1976) RG-45/45/U5
Union Program Council
RG-45/17
Union, Radical Student
see Radical Student Union RG-45/80/R1
Union, Social
see Social Union RG-45/90/S6
Union Video Center (Student Video Project) (1972)
RG-45/30/U5
Unions and Associations
RG-45/45
Unionization, Student
see Student Unionization (Association) RG-45/45/S7
Unions and Associations (Faculty and Staff)
RG-40/5
Unions and Associations (Student Body)
RG-45/45
Unions, Employees
see Unions and Associations RG-40/5
United Asia House (1989)
RG-45/40/U6
see also United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC) (1990) RG-25/U5
United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC) (1990)
RG-25/U5
see also United Asia House (1989) RG-45/40/U6
United Christian Foundation (UCF)
RG-30/12
United States Student Association (USSA) (1983-1988)
RG-45/80/U5
Universities, State
see Land-Grant Colleges, State Universities RG-60/1
University Advancement
see University Relations and Development RG-39
University Affairs Committee (Faculty Senate, 1965-1972)
RG-40/2/A3
University as a Whole
RG-1
University as a Whole–Publications
RG-1/00
University Bulletin (1973-1977)
RG-5/00/6
see also Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin (1953-1971) and Executive Bulletin RG-5/00/3
University Career Center
see Career Center, University RG-30/9/5
University Center for Community College Affairs
see Higher Education, Center for RG-13/3/19/4
University Center for Economic Development (1977- )
RG-6/4/14/2
see also Economic Development, Center for RG-12/12
University China Committee
see China Committee, University RG-40/2/C4
University Chorale
see Singing Clubs–University Chorale RG-25/M9.5
University College (Official University Committee) (1966-1967)
RG-40/2/U5
University College Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1966)
RG-40/2/A3
University Committee on AIDS
see AIDS, University Committee on RG-40/2/A5.5
University Committee on Alcohol Use
see Alcohol Use, University Committee on (Official University Committee) RG-40/2/A6
University Committees, Official
see Official University Committees RG-40/2/A1-W6
University Community Service Council (1993- )
RG-40/2/U6
University Computer Service Newsletter
see UCS Notes RG-29/00/4
University Computing Center
see Computer Center RG-29
University Computing Services
see Computer Center RG-29
University Conference Services
RG-7/3
University Counsel
RG-4/16
University Day School
see School RG-25/H9
University Democrats (Student Social Action Group) (1989- )
RG-45/80/U6
University Directions
see Handbooks (Student Affairs) RG-30/00/2
University Faculty Senate, ad hoc Committee
see Faculty Senate, University, ad hoc Committee on (Official University Committee) (1955) RG-40/2/F2
University Fund for the Future (UFF) (1989- )
RG-50/7/1
University Gallery
see Art Gallery RG-11/15
University Guide Service
see ARCON (1965-1984) RG-45/90/A7
see also University Tour Service (1984- ) RG-30/4/1
University Historical Collection
RG-1/200-299
University History Committee
see History Committee, University (125th Anniversary, 1986-1987) RG-40/2/H5
see also Campus Awareness Committee (1986- ) RG-40/2/C.5
University History Project (125th Anniversary, 1987-1988)
RG-1/208
University Honors Program
see Honors Program RG-6/4/11
University Human Subjects Review Committees
RG-9/1/2/1
University Information Systems
see Umass Information Technology Services RG-35/7
University Internship Program
see Internships, Office of (University Internship Program) RG-11/6
University Lectures, Committee on
see Lectures, Committee on University RG-40/2/L1.5
University Magazine
see Massachusetts Magazine (1990-1996) RG-5/00/11
University Medal for Outstanding Service (1973)
RG-2/99
see also Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
University Monthly Anthropological Survey Service
see UMASS (Newsletter) (1982-1989) RG-25/A6/00
University Newsletter (News Bureau) (1968-1970)
RG-5/00/2
University Notebook (News Bureau) (1980-1981)
RG-5/3/2
University of El Salvador (UES)
RG-60/3
University of Lowell
RG-55/4
University of Massachusetts Foundation (1950- )
RG-50/7
see also Trustees Council RG-2/4
University of Massachusetts, Future Committee on
see Future University of Massachusetts (Official University Committee) (1970-1971) RG-40/2/F8
University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers, Center for
see Center for University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers RG-25/P7.5
University of Massachusetts Republican Club
see Republican Club, University of Massachusetts (1983- ) RG-45/80/R4
University of Massachusetts Transportation Center (UMTC)
RG-25/U4
University, Officials of the (Photographs)
see Officials of the University (Trustees and Presidents Photographs) RG-110
University Outreach
RG-16
University Outreach, Provost for
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach RG-6/6
University Outreach, Vice Chancellor For
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach (2000- ) RG-16/1
University Photo Negatives Collection
RG-171
University Photography Club
see Photographers Association RG-45/40/P5
University Policy
see Vice President for University Policy RG-3/2
University Press (Graduate School)
RG-10/4
see also Research and Graduate Studies RG-9
University Professors, American Association of
see American Association of University Professors (AAUP) RG-40/5/A2
University Relations and Development
RG-39
University Relations and Development Council (Faculty Senate, 1995)
RG-40/2/A3
University Relations and Development–Publications
RG-39/00
University Relations and Development–Vice Chancellor for
see Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development RG-39/1
University Relations, Vice President for
see Vice President for University Relations RG-3/14
University Report (President’s Office) (1978-1979)
RG-3/00
University, Secretary of the
see Secretary of the University RG-3/3
University Staff Association (USA)
RG-40/5/U6
see also Massachusetts State Employees Association (MSEA) (prior to 1977) MS-49
University Statistics (USTAT) (1998) (Student Special Interest Group) RG-45/40/U8
University Store
RG-37/5
University Theatre
RG-25/T3.8
University Tour Service (1984- )
RG-30/4/1
see also ARCON (University Guide Service) (1965-1984) RG-45/90/A7
University Without Walls (UWW) (School of Education)
RG-13/4/2/3
see also Associate Provost for Special Program RG-6
University Without Walls Newsletter (1972-1987)
RG-13/4/2/3
University Women
RG-40/7
University Women’s Network (UWN)
RG-40/5/U7
University Women’s Professional Network (UWPN)
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/W5
University Writing Program
RG-7/11
University Year for Action (UYA) (1971-1976)
RG-6/4/4
Upbeat (1986-1989)
RG-30/11/1
UPC
see Union Program Council (UPC) RG-45/17
Update (1982-1991)
RG-25/P8/00
UPE
see Union of Professional Employees (MTA) MS-47
Upside Down Club (Religious Group) (1992- ) RG-45/70/U7
Upsilon Pi Epsilon (Honor Society)
RG-45/60/U6
Upward Bound (1966-1993)
RG-6/4
see also Upward Bound Committee (Faculty Senate, 1967) RG-40/2/A3
Future Scholars of America (1993- ) RG-6/4/13.5
Upward Bound, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967)
RG-40/2/A3
Urban and Community Forestry, Northeast Center for
see Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry (1996- ) RG-25/N7
Urban Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/23/1
USA
see University Staff Association (USA) RG-40/5/U6
USSA
see United States Student Association (USSA) RG-45/80/U5
UVC TV-19 (Student Run Television Station) (1999- )
RG-45/30/U7
UWN
see University Women’s Network (UWN) RG-40/5/U7
UWPN
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/W5
UWW
see University Without Walls (UWW) RG-13/4/2/3
UYA
see University Year for Action (UYA) (1971-1976) RG-6/4/4
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