Results for: “Hokkaido Daigaku” (17 collections)SCUA

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Agriculture

Founded under the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862 as the Massachusetts Agricultural College, UMass Amherst has long been dedicated to the study and teaching of agriculture and the natural sciences. One of two land grant institutions in the Commonwealth (along with MIT), the university has played an important role in the development of scientific agriculture in New England and has been a major factor in agricultural instruction through its classes and extension service.

SCUA’s collections contain a wealth of information on the history of agriculture and related fields, including horticulture, botany, entomology, animal husbandry, gardening, and landscape design. The strength of the collection lies in documenting the development of American agricultural sciences with an emphasis upon the northeastern states, but it is supplemented with numerous works on British, French, and German agriculture. Adding additional depth are the records of the several departments at UMass Amherst charged with instruction in the agricultural sciences and the papers of individual agricultural educators.

Currently, SCUA is particularly interested in documenting the growth of organic agriculture, heritage breeds, and the practices of sustainable living.

Significant Manuscript collections (view all)

  • Agricultural education
    • Papers of faculty members at Massachusetts Agricultural College and UMass Amherst, as well as educational organizations dedicated to instruction in the agricultural sciences. Among the individuals represented are the agricultural educator, Kenyon Butterfield; Levi Stockbridge, the first farm manager and long-time instructor at MAC; and William Smith Clark, William Penn Brooks, and William Wheeler, who were instrumental in the 1870s in establishing the agricultural college in Hokkaido, Japan.
  • Farming and rural life
    • Correspondence, farm accounts, and other records of farming and rural life, primarily in New England, as well as materials relating to the sociology of rural life.
  • Botany and horticulture
    • Collections relating to the scientific study of botany, horticulture, forestry, and related sciences.
  • Landscape and gardening
    • The papers and photographs of the landscape designer Frank Waugh, and other collections.
  • Other natural sciences
    • Including entomology and geology.

Printed works: Collecting areas

  • Agriculture
    • Early works through the late nineteenth century on agriculture in America, Britain, and Europe, including those by John Fitzherbert, Thomas Hale, Arthur Young, “Columella,” John Smith, Gervase Markham, et al.
  • Animal husbandry
    • Works on sheep culture in the United States (Robert R. Livingston, Samuel Bard) and England (Lord Somerville, John Lawrence); dairy and beef cattle, horses, poultry science.
  • Beekeeping and entomology
    • Among the earliest rare books acquired by the Massachusetts Agricultural Library were a collections of rare books in beekeeping, including key works by Thomas Hill, John Keys, Daniel Wildman, Henry Eddy, from the late 17th through late 19th centuries. Works by Maria Sibylla Merian, John Curtis, Dru Drury, Johann Jakob Romer, Jacob l’Admiral
  • Botany and Silviculture
    • Important works on American botany by Frederick Pursh, Thomas Nuttall, Humphry Marshall’s Arbustrum Americanum, François André Michaux, early editions of Linnaeus
  • Gardening and landscape design
    • Three editions of Bernard M’Mahon’s American Gardener’s Calendar, William Cobbett, Alexander Jackson Davis, Humphry Repton, and others.
  • Genetics, eugenics, animal breeding
    • Essentially compete runs of Eugenics Quarterly, and key works in eugenics.
  • Pomology, viticulture, and fruit culture
    • William Prince, William Coxe, William Chorlton, et al.

Electronic resources

Baszak, Mark A.

Mark A. Baszak Papers, 1991-1992.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 653

Born in Springfield in 1960 and raised in the Pioneer Valley, Mark A. Baszak received a bachelors degree in music composition and MEd. from UMass Amherst. Beginning shortly after completing graduate study, Baszak played a prominent part for over two decades in promoting the arts at his alma mater, serving as Acting Director of the Performing Arts Division (1987-1989), Coordinator and then Director of the Jazz in July program (1990-2008), Associate Director of Multicultural Programs (1993), and organizer of the Black Musicians Conferences and Festival (1989-1999). As an arts and culture representative of the Massachusetts Hokkaido Sister State Association in the early 1990s, Baszak helped foster exchanges between the sister states, visiting Hokkaido with the first official state delegation in 1991. Baszak died after a brief illness on September 25, 2008.

Documenting the early efforts to build upon the 1990 designation of Hokkaido and Massachusetts as sister states, the Baszak collection includes materials concentrated on the first Hokkaido Week in Amherst and the delegation that accompanied Gov. William Weld to Hokkaido in 1991. In addition to correspondence and memos, the collection includes ephemera collected by Baszak during the various ceremonies and transcripts of speeches delivered.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts-Hokkaido Sister State Association

Contributors

  • Baszak, Mark A
  • Weld, William F

Brooks, William Penn, 1851-

William Penn Brooks Papers, 1863-1939.

3 boxes (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 B76
Sapporo Ag. College students, 1881
Sapporo Ag. College students, 1881

Two years after graduating from Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1875, William Penn Brooks accepted an invitation from the Japanese government — and his mentor, William Smith Clark — to help establish the Sapporo Agricultural School. Spending over a decade in Hokkaido, Brooks helped to introduce western scientific agricultural practices and the outlines of a program in agricultural education, and he built a solid foundation for the School. After his return to the states in 1888, he earned a doctorate at the University of Halle, Germany, and then accepted a position at his alma mater, becoming a leading figure at the Massachusetts Experiment Station until his retirement in 1921.

Brooks’ papers consist of correspondence, photographs, newspaper clippings, an account book, and translations which provide rich detail on Brooks’ life in Japan, the development of Sapporo Agricultural College (now Hokkaido University), and practical agricultural education in the post-Civil War years.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku
  • Japan--Description and travel--19th century
  • Japan--History--1868-
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Massachusetts State Agricultural Experiment Station
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo-shi (Japan)--History

Contributors

  • Brooks, William Penn, 1851-

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Concordance for the Archives, H

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

H

Hadley Farm (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/H5
see also UMass Foundation–Land Acquisition RG-50/7
Haigis Mall (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/H6
Haitian Student Association (HASA) (1986- )
RG-45/40/H1
Hampden County Cooperative Extension (1972-1973)
RG-15/8/.83
Hampshire College
see New College Committee and Hampshire College RG-60/6
Hampshire County Cooperative Extension (1922-1983)
RG-15/8/.85
Hampshire Inter-Library Center (HILC) and 4 or 5 College Cooperation (Library) (1951- )
RG-8/7
Handbooks (Student Affairs) (1890- )
RG-30/00/2
see also Dean of Women–Handbook for Women RG-30/3
Handicapped, Committee on Facilities for
RG-30/16
see also CASIAC, Handicapped Counselor RG-11/15
Handicapped Student Affairs, Office of (1973- )
RG-30/29
Handicapped Student Affairs Newsletter (1980-1987)
RG-30/29
Handicapped Student Collective (1979-1981)
RG-45/40/H3
Handicapped Students, Committee to Study Accommodations for (Faculty Senate, 1969-1970)
RG-40/2/A3
Hands Club (Sign Language) (1980′s-1996)
RG-45/40/H3.5
Hang Gliding Club (1989- )
RG-45/40/H2
HASA
see Haitian Student Association (HASA) RG-45/40/H1
Health Club, Hilltop
see Hilltop Health Club (1983) RG-45/40/H5
Health Council (Faculty Senate, 1965- )
RG-40/2/A3
Health Education, Division of
RG-30/15/2
Health Plan, Valley
see Valley Health Plan RG-30/15/13
Health Program (Official University Committee) (1970-1972)
RG-40/2/H4
Health Sciences, School of
see School of Health Sciences RG-17
Health Services
RG-30/15
Health Watch (1977-1989, 1992-1995)
RG-30/15/2
Healy Endowment/Public Service Fund (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/2/4
Hellenic Student Association (1982- )
RG-45/40/H4
see also European Club RG-45/40/E8
Herb, Spice and Medicinal Plant Digest
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Herb, Spice and Medicinal Plant Digest (1983-1995) RG-15/8
Herter Art Gallery
see Art Gallery RG-11/15
High Points (Honors Program) (1986-1990)
RG-6/4/11
High School Guest Day, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1956-1960)
RG-40/2/A3
Higher Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/19/4
Higher Education Coordination Council (1991-1996)
RG-1/5
Higher Education Information Reporting, Statewide, Committee for
see Statewide Higher Education Information Reporting, Committee for (SHEIR) RG-60/11
Higher Education, Massachusetts Board of
see Massachusetts Board of Higher Education RG-1/3
see also Board of Regents (1980-1991) RG-1/4
Higher Education Coordination Council (1991-96)/Board of Higher Education (1996- ) RG-1/5
Higher Education, New England Board of
see New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) RG-60/2
Higher Education Reorganization, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1992)
RG-40/2/A3
HILC
see Hampshire Inter-Library Center (HILC) RG-8/7
Hillel (Religious Group) (1955- )
RG-45/70/H5
Hilltop Health Club (1986)
RG-45/40/H5
Hindu Students Organization (HSO) (Religious Group) (1995- )
RG-45/70/H5.5
Hispanic Cultural Center (1989)
RG-45/40/H6
Hispanic Literature and Linguistics
RG-25/H4
Historical Collection, University
see University Historical Collection RG-1/200-299
Histories, Published, and Historian’s Files
see Published Histories and Historian’s Files RG-1/201
see also Duplicate Collection, Histories of Campus RG-99/6
History Committee, University (1986-1987)
RG-40/2/H5
see also Campus Awareness Committee (1986- ) RG-40/2/C5
History Department
RG-25/H5
History Institute
RG-25/H5.5
History Newsletter (1977- )
RG-25/H5/00
History of the University
RG-1/202
History of the University, By periods (1850- )
RG-1/202/2
History of the University, General (1851-1960′s)
RG-1/202/1
History, Oral
see Oral History RG-1/207
History Project, University
see University History Project (125th Anniversary, 1987-1988) RG-1/208
HMO (Health Maintenance Organization)
RG-30/15
see Health Services RG-30/15
Hobbit, The (Student Publication) (1967)
RG-45/00/H6
Hockey, Men’s
see Sports-Men’s Hockey (1910- ) RG-18/2
Hokkaido University Committee
see Foreign and International Studies Council (Faculty Senate, 1967- ) RG-40/2/A3
Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
see Trustee William Wheeler RG-2/3
President William Smith Clark RG-3/1
Professor Horace E. Stockbridge RG-3/1
President Jean Paul Mather RG-3/1
President John Lederle RG-3/1
David Penhallow (Class of 1873) RG-50/6
see also International Agricultural Studies, Center for RG-15/4
Holdsworth Highlights–Newsletter (1985-1986)
RG-25/F6/00
Holdsworth Natural Resources Center (College of Food and Natural Resources)
RG-15/3
see also College of Agriculture, Holdsworth Natural Resource Center microfilm in main library
microfilms collection, containing serials.
Holdsworth Natural Resources Center Publication
see Community Resource Development RG-15/3
Holdsworth Natural Resources Center–Planning and Resource Development Series (1964-1970)
RG-15/3
Home Economics Division (College of Food and Natural Resources)
RG-15/12
Home Economics Education Department
RG-25/H6
see also Home Economics Division (College of Food and Natural Resources) RG-15/12
Home Economics Leader
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Home Economics Leader (1934-1935) RG-15/8
Home Economics Newsletter
see Creative Living Newsletter (1987- ) RG-15/12
Home Economics Slide Shows
RG-187/3
Honor System
RG-45/11
Honorary Degrees (1972- )
RG-1/7/2
Honorary Degrees (Official University Committee) (1975-1976, 1979)
RG-40/2/H7
Honorary Degrees, Advising Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1980)
RG-40/2/A3
Honorary Degrees Committee (Faculty Senate, 1956-1965)
RG-40/2/A3
Honorary Societies (Student)
RG-45/60
Honors Committee (Faculty Senate, 1956-1969)
RG-40/2/A3
Honors Day
see Honors Office RG-6/4/11
Honors Program (1956-1999)
RG-6/4/11
see
Commonwealth College (1999- )/Honors Program (1956-1999) RG-6/4/11
Honors Theses, Senior
see Senior Honors Theses RG-46/3
Horace Mann Bond Center for Equal Education
RG-13/4/10
see also Equal Education RG-13/3/23/2.5
Hort Notes
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Hort Notes (1990- ) RG-15/8
Horticultural Research Center (College of Food and Natural Resources)
RG-15/17
Horticulture Division of MAC
RG-15/11
Hosmer Memorial Garden (2000)
RG-36/104/H6.5
Hotel Operations (Campus Center)
RG-37/3
Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Administration publication
see HRTA Alumni Key RG-25/H8/00
Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Administration Department
RG-25/H8
House Mouse
RG-30/25
Housing Administration
RG-35/12
see also Housing Office RG-30/21
Dormitories RG-32
Student Center for Educational Research–In Pursuit of Shelter (1975) RG-45/10
Housing Assignment Office
see Housing Office (Housing Assignment Office) RG-30/21
see also Greek Affairs RG-30/2/3
Housing Administration (Administrative Services) RG-35/12
Fraternities and Sororities RG-45/90
Housing Assignments (Housing Services)
RG-32/13
see also Housing Office (Housing Assignment Office) RG-30/21
Housing, Family
see Family Housing (Housing Services) RG-32/10
Housing Office (Housing Assignment Office)
RG-30/21
see also Greek Affairs RG-30/2/3
Housing Assignments (Housing Services) RG-32/13
Housing Administration (Administrative Services) RG-35/12
Fraternities and Sororities RG-45/90
Housing Resource Center, Commuter Service and
see Off Campus Housing Office (OCHO) RG-45/18
Housing Services
RG-32
Housing Services (Microfilm)
RG-190/18
Housing Services Cable Network (HSCN) (1991- )
RG-32/15
Housing Service, Maintenance and Operations
RG-32/11
Housing Services, Budget and Finance
RG-32/6
Housing Services Newsletter
see Perspectives (Housing Services) (1984-1985) RG-32/00
Housing Services, Personnel
RG-32/9
Housing Services Publications
RG-32/00
Housing Services–Racial Understanding, Center for
RG-32
Housing Service Review Committee (1993)
RG-40/2/H7.5
Housing Sub-Committee, Northeast Quadrangle President’s Council
see Northeast Quadrangle President’s Council, Housing Sub-Committee (1968) RG-40/3/N6
Houyhnhnm
RG-45/00/H7
HRTA
see Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Administration Department RG-25/H8
HRTA Alumni Association Newsletter(1974-1976)
RG25/H8
HRTA Alumni Key (1974-1976, 1983-1986)
RG-25/H8/00
HRTA News (1974-1986)
RG-25/H8/00
HRTA Newsletter (Alumni Publication) (1974-1976)
RG-25/H8/00
HS/ABS
see Division of Human Services and Applied Behavioral Sciences (HS/ABS) RG-13/4/1
HSA-News
see Handicapped Student Affairs–Newsletter (1980-1987) RG-30/29
HSCN
see Housing Services Cable Network (HSCN) (1991- ) RG-32/15
Human Development Department
RG-25/H9
Human Development Laboratory School (School of Education)
RG-13/4/1/5
Human Development Laboratory School–Newsletter (1986-1987)
RG-13/4/1/5
Human Needs, Committee on Nutrition and
see Nutrition and Human Needs, Committee on RG-45/80/N8
Human Potential, Center for (School of Education)
RGs: 13/3/15/3, 13/3/17/1, 13/3/26/6
Human Potential Division (School of Education)
see Human Services and Applied Behavioral Sciences RG-13/4/1
see also Human Potential, Center for RGs-13/3/15/3, 13/3/17/1, 13/3/26/6
Human Relations (School of Education)
RG-13/3/15/1
Human Relations, Commission on Civility in
see Civility in Human Relations, Chancellors Commission on (1980- ) RG-40/2/C3
Human Relations, Office of
RG-4/6
Human Relations, Office of Community Development and
see Community Development and Human Relations, Office of RG-30/22
Human Resources News (Human Resources Office) (1983-1985)
RG-35/2
Human Resources Office
see Personnel/Payroll (Human Resources Office) RG-35/2
Human Resources, Office of
RG-3/15
Human Rights and a Responsible University, Committee for (1987- )
RG-40/3/H7
Human Rights in the Soviet Area, Committee for (1974)
RG-40/3/H8
Human Service and Applied Behavioral Sciences (HS/ABS), Division of (School of Education)
RG-13/4/1
Human Subjects Review (Official University Committee ) (1982)
RG-40/2/H8
Human Subjects Review, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1971-1972, 1982)
RG-40/2/A3
see also Graduate Council (Faculty Senate, 1960- ) RG-40/2/A3
Human Subjects Review (Official University Committee) (1982) RG-40/2/H8
Human Subjects Review Committee
see University Human Subjects Review Committee RG-9/1/2/1
Humanistic Applications of Social and Behavioral Sciences Cluster
RG-13/3/15
Humanistic Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/15/2
Humanities and Fine Arts, College of
see Humanities and Fine Arts Faculty RG-11/10
Humanities and Fine Arts, Dean
RG-11/11
Humanities and Fine Arts Faculty
RG-11/10
Humanities and Public Policy, Massachusetts Foundation for
see Massachusetts Foundation for Humanities and Public Policy RG-6/10
Humanities Institute
see Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities RG-6/19
Hunger Task Force, UMass (1982-1989)
RG-45/40/H8
see also MASS AID RG-45/40/M4

Greenbie, Barrie B.

Barrie B. Greenbie Papers, 1934-1997.

17 boxes (19.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 142
Barrie Greenbie with g-frame model
Barrie Greenbie with g-frame model

Barrie Barstow Greenbie was a key member of the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning at UMass Amherst from 1970-1989. In a long and remarkably diverse career, Greenbie worked as an artist with the Works Progress Administration, as a soldier and journalist, as a professor of theater, an architect, inventor, author, and landscape planner. After earning a BA in drama from the University of Miami (1953),he worked for several years in the theatre program at Skidmore College. While there, he added architecture to his array of talents, designing the East 74th Street Theater in New York in 1959, and founded a company to produce a “self-erecting” building designed to substitute for summer tent theaters. Two years after joining the faculty at UMass in 1970, he completed a doctorate in urban affairs and regional planning at the University of Wisconsin and continued with a characteristically broad array of creative pursuits, designing the William Smith Clark Memorial, among other things, and conducting an extensive aerial survey of the landscapes of the Connecticut River Valley. In monographs such as Design for Diversity and Spaces: Dimensions of the Human Landscape, Greenbie examined the interactions between humans and nature. He died at his home on South Amherst in 1998.

The Greenbie Papers document a long career as academic, writer, artist, architect, and theatrical designer. Of particular note is the extensive and engrossing correspondence, which extends from Greenbie’s years as a student at the Taft School in the late 1930s through his World War II service with the Sixth Army in the South Pacific and Japan, to his tenure at UMass Amherst (1970-1989). The collection also includes a small, but interesting correspondence between Greenbie’s parents (1918-1919).

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Greenbie, Barrie B

Japanology

Kaisando Temple

Within a decade of its founding, the Massachusetts Agricultural College began to forge what would become fast ties with its counterparts in Japan. Seeking to establish a thoroughly modern college in Hokkaido, the Imperial Government in Japan looked to America for a model of innovation in agricultural education, settling quickly on MAC. With the leadership of William Smith Clark, a succession of faculty, students, and alumni helped develop the Sapporo Agricultural College (now Hokkaido University).

The Dept. of Special Collections at UMass Amherst (SCUA) houses several collections from those early exchanges, including the papers of William Smith Clark and his students and colleagues William Brooks and William Wheeler, along with the remarkable collections associated with the geologist Benjamin Smith Lyman, a resident of Northampton. These collections have formed a core on which SCUA continues to build. Today, the department specializes in documenting the American study of Japanese history and culture, particularly in the post-war period.

Selected collections

  • Beato, Felice. Papers, ca. 1863-1871.
    • As a photographer, Beato was an important chronicler of late-Edo and early-Meiji era Japan.
  • Brooks, William Penn. Papers, 1863-1939.
    • Invited by the Japanese government — and his mentor, William Smith Clark — to help establish the Sapporo Agricultural College, modeled on the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Spending over a decade in Hokkaido, Brooks helped to introduce western scientific agricultural practices and the outlines of a program in agricultural education, and he built a solid foundation for the School.
  • Clark, William Smith. 1814-2003 (bulk: 1844-1886).
    • Held the presidency of Massachusetts Agricultural College (now University of Massachusetts Amherst) from 1867-1879, and helped to found Sapporo Agricultural College (now Hokkaido University) in Japan in 1876.
  • Lewis, Gertrude. Papers, 1920-2001.
    • An educator for most her life, Lewis ‘s papers document changes within theory and pedagogy over time and in various geographic locales, including Japan, in the field of education.
  • Lyman, Benjamin Smith
    • Papers, 1831-1921. Prominent geologist and mining engineer, Lyman was invited by the Meiji government in Japan to help introduce modern geological surveying and mining techniques during the 1870s and 1880s.
    • Japanese Book Collection, 1710-1898. During his years as a consultant to the Meiji government in Japan, Benjamin Smith Lyman accumulated a large collection of books printed in Japan. His book collection includes works on language to literature, religion, the arts, and culture.
  • Maki, John. Papers.
    • Japanese-American professor of political science at UMass who worked on contemporary Japan, militarism, and post-war constitution. Maki served in U.S. Army Intelligence during the Second World War, and spent several months in Japan in 1946 as part of the Occupation administration.
  • Passin, Herbert. Collection, 1944-1955.
    • Inducted into the Army in 1941 and assigned to duty in Tokyo in December 1945, he became chief of the Public Opinion and Sociological Research Division under Gen. Douglas MacArthur. During his tour of duty, Passin coordinated a series of sociological studies of Japanese village life to help guide U.S. Occupation policy, particularly as it dealt with land and labor reform.
  • Stockbridge, Levi. Papers, 1841-1878.
    • Pioneering agriculturist and president of Massachusetts Agricultural College, whose son, Horace Edward Stockbridge, taught at Hokkaido University and sent descriptions of his travel in Japan home.
  • Totman, Conrad. Papers, 1800-2005.
    • A professor of Japanese history at Yale, Totman’s collection a treasure trove of information on Japan in general, and particularly on his specialties: early modern Japan and forestry and environmental management.
  • Wheeler, William. Papers, 1876-1930.
    • Joined Massachusetts Agricultural College President William Smith Clark and two other alumni of the college in helping to found the Sapporo Agricultural College in Japan (now Hokkaido University), succeeding Clark as president of the school from 1877 to 1879.
  • Yamashita, Yoskiaki. Photograph album, ca. 1904.
    • Professor from Tokyo who traveled the United States providing instruction in the new martial art of judo from 1903-1960.

Knapp, David C.

David C. Knapp Papers, 1990-1995..

1 box (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 K63
Bears
Bears

Born in Syracuse, New York, in 1927, David C. Knapp studied at Syracuse University (BA, 1947) and the University of Chicago (M.A., 1948; PhD, 1953)., before joining the faculty in government at the University of New Hampshire. Recognized as an able administrator from early in his career, Knapp was appointed assistant to the university president and then Dean of the College of Liberal Arts (1961-1962). Leaving UNH in 1963, he served successively as associate director of the Study of American Colleges of Agriculture, director of the Institute of College and University Administrators of the American Council on Education, and Dean of the New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University (1968-1974) before being elected president of the University of Massachusetts in 1978. He retired in 1990.

The Knapp Papers consist primarily of materials relating to efforts in the early 1990s to designate Hokkaido and Massachusetts as sister states, to celebrate the long relationship Between UMass and the University of Hokkaido, and to commemorate the legacy of Benjamin Smith Lyman. In addition to correspondence with the Massachusetts Hokkaido Society and Hokkaido University, the collection includes memorabilia associated with Knapp’s connections with Japan.

Subjects

  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku
  • Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920
  • University of Massachusetts. President

Contributors

  • Knapp, David C
  • Massachusetts Hokkaido Society

Lederle, John William, 1912-

John W. Lederle Papers, 1947-1983 (Bulk: 1960-1970).

(32.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 L43
John W. Lederle
John W. Lederle

John Lederle played a large role in shaping the Amherst campus as it looks today, transforming UMass Amherst into a nationally respected research university and “great public center for excellence in higher education.” Born in Royal Oak, Michigan, Lederle received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1942. Admitted to the Michigan Bar in 1936, he worked with a Detroit law firm from 1936 to 1940 before joining the political science department at Brown University from 1941 to 1944. He returned to the University of Michigan in 1944, filling a number of positions until 1960, when the University of Massachusetts elected him President. Under Lederle’s leadership, the Amherst campus enjoyed its greatest period of growth. From 1960 to 1970, student enrollment more than tripled and faculty salaries nearly doubled. The academic program expanded greatly, particularly at the graduate level, and under his watch, the university instituted an academic press, a public radio station, and collaborative arrangements between the local colleges. The University system also evolved in the Lederle years, with the establishment of the Boston campus in 1964 and the medical school in Worcester in 1962.

The Lederle Papers include professional correspondence, administrative records, subject files, committee notes, reports, and clippings; Extra-University records that document Lederle’s involvement and interactions with governmental and non-governmental organizations at the state, regional, and national levels; personal correspondence, speeches, bibliographies of his writings, biographical information, a transcript of an oral history describing his administration, and materials relating to his professional activities that followed his presidency; and a series of confidential records.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. President

Contributors

  • Lederle, John William, 1912-

Lyman Family Papers

Lyman Family Papers, 1839-1942.

7 boxes (2.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 634
Edward H.R. and Catharine A. Lyman on their wedding day
Edward H.R. and Catharine A. Lyman on their wedding day

The descendants of Joseph Lyman (1767-1847) flourished in nineteenth century Northampton, Mass., achieving social prominence, financial success, and a degree of intellectual acclaim. Having settled in Northampton before 1654, just a generation removed from emigration, the Lymans featured prominently in the development of the Connecticut River Valley. A Yale-educated clerk of the Hampshire County courts, Joseph’s descendants included sons Joseph Lyman (an engineer and antislavery man) and Samuel Fowler Lyman (a jurist), and three Harvard-educated grandsons, Benjamin Smith Lyman (a geologist and traveler in Meiji-era Japan) and brothers Joseph and Frank Lyman (both trained in the natural sciences).

Consisting of the scattered correspondence and photographic record of three generations of an intellectually adventurous Northampton family, the Lyman collection explores the ebb and flow of family relations, collegiate education, and educational travel in Europe during the mid-nineteenth century, with important content on antislavery and the Free State movement in Kansas. Although the family’s tendency to reuse names (repeatedly) presents a challenge in distinguishing the various recipients, the focal points of the collection include the geologist Benjamin Smith Lyman, his uncle Joseph (1812-1871), cousins Joseph (1851-1883) and Frank, and Frank’s son Frank Lyman, Jr. Antislavery is a major theme in the letters of Samuel F. Lyman to his son Benjamin, and in the letterbook of the Kansas Land Trust, an affiliate of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, of which the elder Joseph was Treasurer.

Subjects

  • Antislavery movements--Massachusetts
  • Germany--Description and travel--19th century
  • Harvard University--Students
  • Kansas Land Trust
  • Kansas--History--1854-1861
  • New England Emigrant Aid Company

Contributors

  • Lawrence, Amos Adams, 1814-1886
  • Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920
  • Lyman, Joseph B, 1812-1871

Types of material

  • Photographs
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