Results for: “Experimental theater” (62 collections)SCUA

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Uno, Roberta

Roberta Uno Collection of Asian American Women Playwrights' Scripts, 1924-2005.

25 boxes (9 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 345
Coconut masquerade postcard
Coconut masquerade postcard

Roberta Uno was the founder and long time artistic director of the New WORLD Theater at UMass Amherst, a theater in residence dedicated to the production of works by playwrights of color.

Established by Uno in 1993, the Asian American Women Playwrights Scripts Collection contains manuscripts of plays, but also production histories, reviews, and articles, along with biographies and audio and videotaped interviews with playwrights. Among the individuals represented are Brenda Wong Aoki, Jeannie Barroga, Marina Feleo Gonzales, Jessica Hagedorn, Velina Hasu Houston, Genny Lim, le thi diem thuy, Ling-Ai Li, Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl, Nobuko Miyamoto, Bina Sharif, and Diana Son.

Subjects

  • Asian American women authors
  • New WORLD Theater
  • Playwrights

Contributors

  • Uno, Roberta, 1956-

Types of material

  • Scripts (Documents)

Volbach, Walther R. (Walther Richard), 1897-

Walther R. Volbach Papers, 1897-1996.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 087
Walther R. Volbach
Walther R. Volbach

Born in Mainz, Germany on December 24, 1897, the theater historian and stage director Walther R. Volbach began directing operas and plays at the age of 17. After his immigration to the United States in 1936, he worked for several colleges, coming to the University of Massachusetts Amherst for five years as a visiting professor following his retirement in 1965. Noted as a director of operas and plays and for his set design, Volbach was author of three books: The Problems of Opera Production (1953), Adolphe Appia : The Prophet of The Modern Theatre (1968), and Memoirs of Max Reinhardt’s Theaters (1972).

The Volbach collection includes personal and professional correspondence in English and German, mostly from Volbach’s later years, regarding family, publishing, lectures, and employment. The collection also includes photographs of set designs, an image of Volbach teaching a class, publications, and lecture and research notes on theater history.

Subjects

  • Appia, Adolphe, 1862-1928
  • Drama--Study and teaching
  • Set designers
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Theater

Contributors

  • Volbach, Walther R. (Walther Richard), 1897-

Barton, George W.

George W. Barton Papers, 1889-1984 (Bulk: 1914-1920).

(4.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 50 B37

George W. Barton was born in Sudbury, Massachusetts in 1896. After attending Concord High School in Concord, Barton began his studies in horticulture and agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural College in Amherst. The collection includes diaries, scrapbooks, photographs, newspaper clippings, programs, announcements, and his herbarium, and relates primarily to his career at the Massachusetts Agricultural College where he studied horticulture and agriculture from 1914-1918.

Subjects

  • Botany--Study and teaching
  • Horticulture--Study and teaching
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students

Contributors

  • Barton, George W

Types of material

  • Diaries
  • Herbaria
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks

Brann, Clinton

Clinton Brann Papers, 1891-1963.

4 boxes (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 594
Clinton Brann
Clinton Brann

In 1918, Clinton Melville Tilman Brann, a dentist by training, served with in the 17th Field Artillery of the American Expeditionary Forces in France, a unit cited for gallantry in five critical engagements of the First World War. During his time overseas, Brann maintained an intense correspondence with Rhea Oppenheimer, despite fears that their different religious (he Presbyterian, she Jewish) and family backgrounds would prove an obstacle. After demobilization, Brann returned home and on Sept. 17, 1919, married Rhea. He went on to build a successful practice in dentistry in Iowa, raising a son and daughter. Clinton Brann passed away on Sept 8, 1961, in Orlando, Fla., with Rhea following on December 29, 1987 in Winter Park, Fla.

In two regards, the Brann collection presents an unusual glimpse into families affected by the First World War. First, Brann’s letters home offer a sense of his unusual role in the service, as a junior officer and dentist, and second, his letters are marked by his unusual relationship with Rhea Oppenheimer and their concerns over the future prospects for a mixed marriage. The collection also includes a wealth of photographs of the Branns’ life together, a family scrapbook, and a handful of mementoes and miscellaneous documents.

Subjects

  • Brann family
  • Courtship
  • Dentists--Iowa
  • World War, 1914-1918--Medical care

Contributors

  • Brann, Clinton
  • Brann, Rhea Oppenheimer

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks

Brooks Farm

"Summer Scenes, Brooke Farm, 1922", 1922-1923.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 037
Haying at MAC
Haying at MAC

In 1922, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts appropriated $15,000 for the Massachusetts Agricultural College to purchase sixty acres of land lying immediately north of the existing Experiment Station. Known as the William P. Brooks Experimental Farm, the property was intended as a site for experimental work devoted to the dominant crops of the Connecticut Valley, tobacco and onions.

This small homemade photograph album documents a picnic and group outing at the Brooke (i.e. Brooks) Farm at Massachusetts Agricultural College in September 1922. Although the participants — over thirty of them — are unidentified, they took part in standard picnic activities, including a tug of war, three legged race, and rope jumping. The album contains labeled snapshots pasted onto thick brown paper, tied with a brown ribbon, and includes images of haying on the farm (with Stockbridge Hall in the background) and the homes of William P. Brooks and Prof. Arthur N. Julian.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Photographs
  • Brooks Experimental Farm (Amherst, Mass.)
  • Hay
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Photographs
  • Picnics--Photographs

Contributors

  • Fay, Harry W.

Types of material

  • Photograph albums
  • Photographs

Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Judi Chamberlin Papers, ca.1970-2010.

23 boxes (34.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 768
Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Subjects

  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.

Contributors

  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center

Types of material

  • Videotapes

Clark, John G., d. 1972

John G. Clark Papers, 1960-1969.

3 boxes (3.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 499
John G. Clark and H. P. Hood milk truck
John G. Clark and H. P. Hood milk truck

With a life long interest in politics, John G. Clark of Easthampton, Massachusetts worked on a number of campaigns before running for office himself. He ran for state senator in 1958, but lost in the Democratic primary. Two years later he ran again, this time for state representative of the 3rd Hampshire District, and won. Clark served in the State House of Representative for eight years until he was appointed clerk of the district court in Northampton and chose not to run for reelection.

While this collection is small, it is packed with campaign materials, letters, position statements, speeches, and press releases that together offer a good sense of the political climate in Massachusetts during the 1960s, especially issues of local concern for Hampshire County. Four letters from a young neighbor written while serving in Vietnam provide a personal account of the war.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts--History
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Contributors

  • Clark, John G., d. 1972

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 3/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Common Reader Bookshop (New Salem, Mass.)

Common Reader Bookshop Collection, 1978-1997.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 472

Co-owned by Dorothy Johnson and Doris Abramson, the Common Reader Bookshop in New Salem, Massachusetts specialized in women’s studies materials, or in their words, “books by, for, and about women.” A couple for almost 40 years and married in 2004, Johnson and Abramson, a professor in the theater department at UMass, opened the store in 1977. After nearly twenty-five years in operation, the book shop closed its doors for business in 2000. Comprised mostly of photographs, the collection highlights not only the shop as a place, but also the the community it fostered.

Subjects

  • Booksellers and Bookselling--Massachusetts
  • New Salem (Mass.)--History
  • Women--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Abramson, Doris
  • Common Reader Bookshop (New Salem, Mass.)
  • Johnson, Dorothy

Concordance for the Archives, N

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

N

NAC
see Non Academic Computing (NAC) (1996- ) RG-45/40/N6
NAGE
see International Brotherhood of Police Officers RG-40/5/P6
Naiads (Swim Team)
see Athletic Department RG-18/2
National Alternative Schools Program
see Alternative Schools (National Alternative Schools Program) RG-13/3/21/7
National Environmental Technology for Waste Prevention Institute (NETI) (1994- )
RG-25/N3
National Organization for Women (NOW) (1989)
RG-45/80/N7
National Park Service Cooperative Research Unit (The Environmental Institute) (1975-1981)
RG-6/4/14/3
National Park Service Cooperative Research Unit Report (The Environmental Institute) (1977-1981)
RG-6/4/14/3
Natural History, Massachusetts, Bulletin of
see Massachusetts Natural History, Bulletin of (1884) RG-25/E4/00
Natural History Society (1883-1895)
RG-45/40/N3.6
Natural Resources Center, Holdsworth
see Holdsworth Natural Resource Center RG-15/3
Natural Resources, College of Food and
see College of Food and Natural Resources RG-15
Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Dean
RG-11/51
Natural Sciences and Mathematics Faculty
RG-11/50
Near Eastern Studies (Program and Committee)
RG-25/N4
see also Classics Department RG-25/C5
Near Eastern Studies Newsletter (1989)
RG-25/N4/00
NEBHE
see New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) RG-60/2
Negatives, Glass Plate
see Glass Plate Negatives RG-173
Negro Universities, Exchange Programs With
see Exchange Programs-Negro Universities (1965) RG-30/8
NERCCS
see New England Regional Consortium for Computational Studies (NERCCS) RG-29/1
NETI
see National Environmental Technology for Waste Prevention Institute (NETI) (1994- ) RG-25/N3
Neuroendocine Studies, Center for
RG-25/N4.5
Neuroscience and Behavior Program
RG-25/N5
Neuroscience Systems, Center for
see Systems Neuroscience, Center for RG-25/S10
New Africa House
see Black Culture Center (New Africa House) RG-30/26
see also Buildings (New Africa House) RG-36/101
New American Movement (Student Social Action Group) (1973)
RG-45/80/N4
New College Committee and Hampshire College
RG-60/6
New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE)
RG-60/2
New England Classical Newsletter
RG-25/C5/00
New England Council of Land-Grant University Women
RG-60/1/1
New England Culture, Center for
see Center for New England Culture (College of Arts and Sciences) RG-11/9
New England Regional Consortium for Computational Studies (NERCCS)
RG-29/1
New Senate AGENDA
see AGENDA, The New Senate (1993- ) RG-45/00/A1
New Student Record (1983, class of 1987)
RG-45/90/P3
New Students Program–Community Development Center
RG-30/9/2
New Students Program (Summer Counseling)
RG-30/9/2
see also Counseling Center RG-30/9/1
New Testament Fellowship (Religious Group) (1983, 1986)
RG-45/70/N3
New World Theater
RG-25/F3/N4
see also RG-25/T3.7
see also Notes For A New World (1987- ) RG-25/T3.7/00
Newcomer’s Club (Women’s Group)
RG-40/7/2
Newman Center
RG-30/11/1
see also Newman Club RG-45/70/N4
Newman Center Newsletter (1996- )
RG-30/11/1/00
Newman Club (Religious Group) (1963-1989)
RG-45/70/N4
see also Newman Center RG-30/11/1
News (President’s Office)
RG-3/00
News and Notes (Student Publication) (1959)
RG-45/00/N4
News and Views, UMass Alumni
see UMass Alumni News and Views (1978-1983) RG-50/00/3
News Bulletin (1937-1941) RG-40/3/P3

News Bureau
Note: Name changed to Office of Public Information, 10-6-1983.
see Office of Public Information (OPI) RG-5/3
News Letter (Extension Service, Cooperative) (1913-1921)
RG-15/8
News Office
see Office of Public Information (News Bureau) RG-5/3
News Project (1968)
RG-45/00/N5
News Service, MAC (Official University Committee) (1926)
RG-40/2/N4
News Summary (Public Affairs) (1993-1994)
RG-5/3/4
NewsClips (Public Affairs) (1984-1987)
RG-5/00/8
NewsLetter (School of Management) (1983-1985)
RG-12
Newsletter, University
see University Newsletter (News Bureau) RG-5/00/2
Newsline (1991)
RG-25/F6/00
Newsline (News Office) (1999- )
RG-5/00/13
Nominating Committee (Faculty Senate, 1967, 1977)
RG-40/2/A3
NOMMO (1990-1994)
RG-45/00/N6
see also Nummo News (1974-1990) RG-30/26/N8
Non-Academic Computing (Student Group) (NAC) (1996)
RG-45/40/N6
Nonformal Education Center
see Center for International Education (CIE) (School of Education) RG-13/3/19/5
North American Trade and Economics, Institute for
RG-25/N6
North Pleasant Street (Joint Town-University Task Force) (1968- )
RG-36/104/N6
North Village Apartments (Residential Buildings)
RG-36/102/N5
Northeast (Residential Buildings)
RG-36/102/N6
Northeast Area Government
RG-45/14
Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry (1996- )
RG-25/N7
Northeast Forestry Experiment Station (College of Food and Natural Resources) (1923-1933)
RG-15/13
Northeast Metric Research Center
RG-7/6
Northeast Quadrangle President’s Council, Housing sub-committee (1968)
RG-40/3/N6
Northeast Region Environmental Public Health Center
RG-17/1/1
Northeast Regional Media Center for the Deaf
see Media Specialists for the Deaf, Center for (School of Education) RG-13/3/21/9
Northeast Science Enrichment Program
see Mathematics and Statistics Department–Science Enrichment Program RG-25/M5/3
Northern Educational Services (Social Action Group) (1975)
RG-45/80/N6.4
Notebook, University
see University Notebook RG-5/3/2
Notes For A New World (1987-1988)
RG-25/T3.7/00
Notes From Academic Affairs (1981-1983)
RG-6/00/N6
Notes from the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (1973-1974,1977-1978)
RG-30/00/1
NOW
see National Organization for Women (1989- ) RG-45/80/N7
NU (Hillel) (1973, 1975)
RG-45/70/H5
Nummo News (1974-1991)
RG-30/26/N8
see also NOMMO (1990-1994) RG-45/00/N6
Nursery School
RG-25/H9.5
Nurses Association, Student
see Student Nurses Association (SNA) (1987- ) RG-45/40/S7.4
Nursing
RG-17/3
Nursing Alumni Association Newsletter (1989-1993)
RG-17/3
Nursing, School of
see Nursing RG-17/3
Nutrient Data Bank, UMass
see Food Science and Nutrition, Dept. of–Nutrient Data Bank, UMass RG-25/F5/3
Nutrition and Human Needs, Committee on (1971)
RG-45/80/N8
Nutrition Department
see Food Science and Nutrition Department RG-25/F5
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