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Dudley, Joseph

Joseph Dudley Memoir and Diary, 1866-1893
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 650 bd

Born in Cheshire, Conn., in 1822, Joseph Dudley learned “the marble business” from his father Elias, who had in turn been trained by David Ritter of New Haven. A staunch Methodist swept up in the religious ferment of the Second Great Awakening, Dudley joined his father’s business as a stonecutter in about 1845 and notes that he was among the first to letter tombstones in the rural Ever Green Cemetery in Woodstock, Conn., when it opened in 1848. He later worked in Meriden, Conn.

By generations, this volume has served as an account book, diary and memorandum book, memoir, geneaological record, and scrapbook, with each layer accumulated over all previous. Dudley’s memoir (beginning p. 78) includes a discussion of his upbringing in Cheshire, the tumultuous religious revivals during the 1840s and his reception into the Methodist Church and the Millerites, and much on his introduction to the marble business and work as a stonecutter through about 1853. The diary somewhat erratically covers the years 1873-1893.

Subjects
  • Gravestones--Connecticut
  • Marble industry and trade--Connecticut
  • Millerite movement
  • Stonecutters
Contributors
  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Dudley, Joseph
Types of material
  • Diaries
  • Memoirs

Black, Joseph Laurence, 1962-

Joseph Laurence Black History of the Book Collection, 1789-1964
128 items (3 linear feet)
Call no.: RB 023
Joseph Laurence Black History of the Book Collection image
The Woman Trapper (1908)

A scholar of early modern British literature, Joe Black received his BA and PhD from the University of Toronto and taught for several years at the University of Tennessee Knoxville before joining the English faculty at UMass Amherst in 1994. Rooted in the history of the book, his research on seventeenth-century literature has examined the intersection between writing and the material and social context of production as well as the dialogue between print and manuscript culture.

The Black collection is an eclectic assemblage of American imprints designed to assist study and instruction in the history of the book. The collection includes two long runs of pulp novels, Beadle’s Frontier Series and the American Revolution-inspired Liberty Boys of ’76, examples of almanacs, prompt books, and works form the early national period in publishers’ bindings.

Subjects
  • Books--History--United States
  • Dime novels, American
Types of material
  • Almanacs
  • Scrapbooks

Czaja, Mrs. Joseph

Josephine Czaja Papers, 1936-1987
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 189

Born in Poland, Josephine Latonsinska emigrated with her parents to the U.S. at the age of two. After studies at the Booth and Bayliss Commercial College in Waterbury, Connecticut, Josephine worked as a secretary for a Waterbury firm. Married to Joseph Czaja in 1926, the couple moved to Springfield, Massachusetts where Joseph worked as a druggist. Trained as a musician, Mrs. Czaja was an active member of the St. Cecilia Choir and the Ladies Guild, both of Our Lady of the Rosary Church.

The collection consists of photocopies of news clippings, probably compiled as a series of scrapbooks by Mrs. Czaja, depicting the activities of Polish community of Springfield from 1936 to 1987.

Subjects
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts--Springfield
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Social conditions
Types of material
  • Scrapbooks

Donohue, Joseph W., 1935-

Joseph W. Donohue Papers, 1963-2003
37 boxes (55.5 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 110

Theater historian and critic, Joseph W. Donohue, Jr., was appointed Associate Professor of English at UMass Amherst in 1971. An alumnus of Princeton (PhD, 1965), Donohue specialized in British drama and theater, with an emphasis on the period from the Restoration to the present day, with a particular interest in the study of the performed play and its relationship to the audience, community, and society. While at UMass, he taught courses ranging from Shakespeare on Film to The Vitality of British Drama. Donohue remained at UMass until his retirement in May 2005.

The papers reflect Donohue’s professional life from his time at Princeton through his years as a Professor of English at UMass. Among the papers are course notes, teaching materials, and a myriad of materials relating to the history of British theater.

Subjects
  • Theater--History--Great Britain
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
Contributors
  • Donohue, Joseph W., 1935-

Donohue, Joseph W., 1935-

Joseph Donohue Collection of Theatre Programs and Theatrical Ephemera, 1968-2010
23 boxes (12 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 696

An historian of modern British drama, Joseph Donohue was a longtime member of the Department of English at UMass Amherst. A native of Brookline, Mass., Donohue was educated at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown before receiving his doctorate at Princeton (1965), and he studied directing at both Columbia and Yale. After five years at Princeton, he joined the faculty at UMass in 1971, where he remained for thirty four years. The author of numerous articles and books on the British and Irish theatre, Donohue was author — among many other works — of Dramatic Character in the English Romantic Age (1970) and Theatre in the Age of Kean (1975) and editor of the London Stage, 1800-1900 Project. A past president of the American Society for Theatre Research, he was also a fixture in local performances, including the Valley Light Opera Company. Upon retirement from the department in 2005, Donohue was named Professor Emeritus.

Consisting of hundreds of theatrical programs and other ephemera, the Donohue collection documents a lifetime of avid theater-going. The astonishing array of playwrights and plays represented in the collection, and the diversity of theatres (mostly in New York and London), provides a nearly exhaustively chronicle of Donohue’s theatrical habits from his days as a graduate student to nearly the present.

Subjects
  • Theater--England--London
  • Theater--New York (State)--New York
Contributors
  • Donohue, Joseph W., 1935-
Types of material
  • Ephemera
  • Playbills

Estey, Joseph W.

Joseph W. Estey Account Book, 1809-1827
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 093

Joseph W. Estey was the owner of a farm in Greenwich, Massachusetts with a grist and sawmill. The account book (started in Springfield and Ludlow, Massachusetts with his business partner Abner Putnam) documents business dealings, hired male and female help, personal and farm expenses (hiring tanners and blacksmiths), and a deed.

Subjects
  • Agricultural laborers--Massachusetts--Greenwich
  • Domestics--Massachusetts--Greenwich
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Greenwich
  • Greenwich (Mass.)--Economic condition--19th century
  • Howe, Edward
  • Howe, Gideon
  • Lincoln, Benjamin
  • Ludlow (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Marcy, Laban
  • Mills and mill-work--Massachusetts--Greenwich
  • Oaks, John
  • Parson Clapp Tavern
  • Putnam, A. W.
  • Putnam, Abner
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Vaughan, Josiah
  • Ware Manufacturing Co. (Ware, Mass.)
  • Warner, John
Contributors
  • Estey, Joseph W.
Types of material
  • Account books

Hagar, Joseph A. (Joseph Archibald), 1896-1989

Joseph A. Hagar Papers, 1897-1976 (Bulk: 1930-1965)
6 boxes (7.92 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 743
Joseph A. Hagar Papers image
Hudsonian godwit hatchlings

An ornithologist and conservationist for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Joseph A. “Archie” Hagar’s career was rooted in the generation of naturalists such as William Brewster, Edward Howe Forbush, and Arthur Cleveland Bent. Born in Lawrence, Mass., on May 13, 1896, Hagar’s undergraduate career at Harvard was interrupted by service in the First World War, after which he completed his studies at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, graduating with the class of 1921. An expert field biologist and ecologist, he was appointed State Ornithologist in the Department of Fish and Game in November 1934 serving in that position for almost twenty five years. A specialist in waterfowl and raptors, Hagar was deeply involved in early conservation efforts in New England, noted for his work on wetland conservation and for linking the use of DDT with eggshell thinning in peregrine falcons, and he was famously at the center of a dispute with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over the design of the Parker River Wildlife Refuge. Never a prolific writer, he was an active member of the American Ornithological Union, the Nuttall Ornithological Club, the Wildlife Society, and other professional organizations, and after retirement, he was specially cited for his work in waterfowl conservation by Ducks Unlimited. Active until late in life, he died at home in Marshfield Hills on Dec. 17, 1989.

The Hagar Papers are a deep and valuable resource for the study of New England birds and the growth of modern conservation biology. With abundant professional correspondence, field notes on shorebirds and raptors, and drafts of articles, the collection documents the full range of Hagar’s activities as State Ornithologist, including a particularly thick run of material for the controvery over the Parker River Wildlife Refuge. Hagar also acquired a set of field notes, 1897-1921, from the Harvard ornithologist John E. Thayer.

Subjects
  • Birds--Massachusetts
  • Black duck
  • Conservationists--Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Ornithologists--Massachusetts
  • Parker River National Wildlife Refuge
Contributors
  • Hagar, Joseph A. (Joseph Archibald), 1896-1989
Types of material
  • Field notes
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs

Joseph D. Norton and Son

Joseph D. Norton and Son Account Book, 1851-1881
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 103 bd

Father and son wood turners, manufacturers of ladders, and general wood workers from the Loudville section of Westhampton, Massachusetts. Includes names of customers and businesses (bulk of the accounts are with local lumber and furniture dealers S.M. Smith Co., E.H. Lyman, Medad Pomeroy, and Charles Loud & Co.), items sold (such as bureaus, tables, and lumber), furniture that they repaired, and supply items which they acquired (such as varnish, stain, glass, tacks). Also contains documentation of employee payment, flour, tow, sugar, and coffee purchases, and employee lost work days.

Subjects
  • Charles Loud and Co
  • E. H. Lyman (Firm)
  • Furniture industry and trade--Massachusetts--Northampton--History--19th century
  • Furniture industry and trade--Massachusetts--Westhampton--History--19th century
  • Furniture--Repairing--Massachusetts--Loudville--History--19th century
  • Ladders
  • Loudville (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Lumber trade--Massachusetts--Northampton--History--19th century
  • Lumber trade--Massachusetts--Westhampton--History--19th century
  • Medad Pomeroy (Firm)
  • S.M. Smith Co.
  • Wages--Furniture workers--Massachusetts--Loudville--History--19th century
  • Wages-in-kind--Massachusetts--Loudville--History--19th century
  • Woodworkers--Massachusetts--Loudville--Economic conditions--19th century
Contributors
  • Norton, Joseph D.
  • Norton, Leonard
Types of material
  • Account books

Langland, Joseph

Joseph Langland Papers, ca.1943-2007
3 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 181
Paul Langland
Paul Langland

The poet Joseph Langland was raised on the family farm in northeastern Iowa, and earned both a BA (1940) and MA (1941) from the famed writing program at the University of Iowa, before being inducted into the military service during the Second War War. Returning home, Langland published his first book of poetry, For Harold (1945) for his younger brother who had been killed in action in the Philippines. After teaching part-time at Iowa, he moved on to the faculty at the University of Wyoming (1948-1959) and then UMass Amherst. Part of a wave of energetic young writers and scholars to arrive on campus, Langland became active in the early years of the Massachusetts Review and became founder the university’s MFA Program for Poets and Writers. A prolific writer he contributed regularly to literary magazines and was author of “The Green Town” (1956), “The Wheel of Summer” (1963), “The Sacrifice Poems” (1975), “Any Body”s Song” (1980), and “Selected Poems” (1991), Langland was recipient of the National Council of the Arts Award, the Melville Cane Award, the Amy Lowell Award, and a Ford Faculty Fellowship, among other honors. After his retirement from UMass in 1979, he served as emeritus until his death in 2007.

The Langland Papers include a substantial number of original manuscripts of poetry, many unpublished, correspondence with major poets, and an extensive run of Langland’s letters written home to his wife and family during the war. Other Langland Papers are housed at Luther College in Iowa.

Subjects
  • Poets--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
  • World War, 1939-1945
Types of material
  • Photographs
Restrictions: Copyright retained by the family

Lindsey, Joseph B.

Joseph B. Lindsey Papers, 1891-1945
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 077
Joseph B. Lindsey Papers image
Joseph B. Lindsey

The career of the agricultural chemist Joseph Bridego Lindsey was tied closely to his alma mater, the Massachusetts Agricultural College. A brilliant student, Lindsey earned his bachelor’s degree in 1883 after only three years of study and he launched his professional life at the College, working with his mentor Charles A. Goessmann at MAC and then for the L.B. Darling Fertilizer Company in Pawtucket, Mass. After enrolling at the prestigious Gottingen University and earning his degree in 1891 after only two years, Lindsey returned to Amherst to work at the College’s Experimental Station, where he helped initiate an extension program. Noted for promoting legislation in the state to support research and purity in animal feed, Lindsey rose to become head of the MAC Chemistry Department from 1911 until 1928 and oversaw the creation of the Goessmann Chemistry Laboratory in 1921. He retired from the College in 1932 and died in Amherst on October 27, 1939.

The Lindsey collection includes published articles and pamphlets as well as an analysis of the water in the campus pond from 1901, where Lindsey demonstrated that the water was unsafe for human consumption. There is also correspondence from Lindsey’s son about a memorial plaque and portrait of Lindsey, along with several photographs of the former chemist.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Chemistry
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