Howland Family Papers

Overview: The Howland family of East Greenwich, R.I., figured prominently in New England Quakerism during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and contributed to the state's public affairs. Brothers Daniel (1754-1834), an approved minister, and Thomas Howland (1764-1845), an educator, were active members of the Society during the tumultuous years between the 1780s and 1840s, caught up in the moral demands for a response to slavery and other social issues and in the divisions wrought by evangelical influences.

Centered largely on the lives of Thomas Howland, his brother Daniel, and Daniel's son Daniel, the Howland collection is an important record of Quaker life in Rhode Island during trying times. As meeting elders, the Howlands monitored and contributed to the era's major controversies, and the collection is particularly rich in discussions of the impact of slavery and the passionate struggle between Friends influenced by the evangelically-inclined Joseph John Gurney and the orthodox John Wilbur. Thomas' complex response to his commitment to the antislavery cause and his fear of disrupting meeting unity is particularly revealing. Also of note is a series of responses from monthly meetings to queries on compliance with Quaker doctrine, obtained during the decade after the American Revolution.

See similar SCUA collections:

African American
Antislavery
Civil rights
Education
Peace
Quakers
Reform
Rhode Island

Background on Howland Family

The Howlands were among New England's earliest emigrants from England, with John Howland arriving in Plymouth aboard the Mayflower and his brother Henry recorded there in 1624. Although they came as fervent Separatists, however, some members of the family wasted little time in changing religious course. Even as harsh proscriptions on non-conformists were being enforced in Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth, Henry's son Zoeth joined the Society of Friends by 1662, attending as a member of the Apponegansett Meeting in Dartmouth, Mass.

Around the edges of Narragansett Bay, the Howlands found a congenial home, achieving a degree of social prominence and financial success. Zoeth's son Daniel (the first of many to carry that name) established a tavern in Tiverton, R.I., and a ferry service that crossed to Portsmouth, and his son Daniel was well enough respected in the colony to be selected as a representative for Portsmouth in the general assembly. Although not as wealthy as the grandees of Newport or Providence, Daniel secured his status as a landed gentleman by purchasing a 104 acre farm in East Greenwich, R.I., from the family of Clement Weaver, one of the town's founders and a long-time member of the colonial elite. The property included a house originally built in 1679 that was often referred to as the Howland homestead thereafter, although it is now generally known as the Clement Weaver-Daniel Howland house. It is considered the second oldest residence in Rhode Island.

Daniel's son, the third to be named Daniel (1724-1802), inherited the homestead upon his father's death in 1752. He and his wife Philadelphia Brownell (1726-1810) raised a large family of ten there, several of whom distinguished themselves among Friends. Most notably, Daniel (1754-1834) became an approved minister, visiting throughout New England, New York, and Pennsylvania, while his younger brother Thomas (1764-1845) filled a variety of roles for the Monthly Meeting at East Greenwich, and the Quarterly and Yearly Meetings. The second youngest of his siblings, born on September 5, 1764, Thomas spent much of adult life engaged in Friends' affairs. In addition to serving as clerk of the meeting at Greenwich from 1815 to 1818, and on the Yearly Meeting for Sufferings, Thomas was closely allied to the educational efforts of New England Friends led by his friend Moses Brown, serving as a teacher and Superintendent at the Friends Boarding School (later the Moses Brown School) in Providence. Daniel Howland Greene, the author of the History of the Town of East Greenwich, recalled his distinctive relative:

Perhaps no person in New England Yearly Meeting had greater influence, and none whose counsel was more frequently sought than Thomas Howland's. His suavity of manners and equanimity of mind secured the love of his friends, while his keen wit and sound judgment, expressed in choice language, made him formidable in controversy. Without being strained, is politeness and affability seemed born of courts, and included all in its range; rich and poor, young and old, were greeted alike, and always with an air of interest and condescension. In the business meetings of the Society his remarks were always pertinent, and if he spoke amidst the tumult and confusion of town-meeting, the people at once became tranquil and listened with respectful attention. [p.96]

Thomas' steady nature served him through a tumultuous period in the New England Yearly Meeting, buffeted by war, agitation over slavery, and the impact of both the Hicksite schism and the Gurneyite and Wilburite controversies. His sympathy for social reform and passionate regard for the necessity of living up to Friends' moral precepts was at times pitted against his deep concern for the unity of the Meeting. A natural opponent of slavery, he found himself in the position of fending off more radical calls from fellow Quakers that questioned the Yearly Meeting's commitment to the cause, and as a member of the Meeting for Sufferings, he was on the front lines in disputes between supporters of John Joseph Gurney and John Wilbur. Thomas never married and died in East Greenwich on May 19, 1845.

From Daniel (3) and Philadelphia Howland, the homestead descended to Daniel (4), to his son Daniel (a merchant in the firm of Franklin & Howland), and then to Daniel's daughter Mary and he husband Arthur Knight. The house remained in possession of the family until the 1930s.

Contents of Collection

Centered largely on the lives of Thomas Howland, his brother Daniel, and Daniel's son Daniel, the Howland collection is an important record of Quaker life in Rhode Island during trying times. As meeting elders, the Howlands monitored and contributed to the era's major controversies, and the collection is particularly rich in discussions of the impact of slavery and the passionate struggle between Friends influenced by the evangelically-inclined Joseph John Gurney and the orthodox John Wilbur. Thomas' complex response to his commitment to the antislavery cause and his fear of disrupting meeting unity is particularly revealing. Also of note is a series of answers from monthly meetings to queries on compliance with Quaker doctrine. Obtained during the decade after the American Revolution, these queries seldom elicit lengthy responses, but the questions include the impact of war taxes and slaveholding.

In addition to the important content on antislavery (see especially letters of and about William Bassett, A. Pierce, Mary Murray, and several essays by Thomas Howland) and the beginnings of the Wilburite schism, the collection offers insight into other aspects of Quaker life, including the intense networks of family and friends that sustained the Society. The collection includes scattered information on the early years of the Moses Brown School, and efforts by meeting officials to deflect criticism of the Society and disputes within.

Collection inventory
Series 1. Howland Family correspondence
1727-1886
A., D.: On the death of Obadiah Brown 10th mo. 1822 and Times past and present
ca.1822
2p.
Box 1: 8

"Poetical essays."

Aldrich, Thomas: Letter to Daniel Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1838 Dec. 12
1p.
Box 1: 15
Aldrich, Thomas: Letter to Daniel Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1838 June 21
1p.
Box 1: 16
Aldrich, Thomas: Letter to Daniel Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1839 Apr. 15
1p.
Box 1: 15

Whale oil.

Almy, Anna: Letter to Deborah and Anna Howland
ca.1820
2p.
Box 1: 24

Advice to the young on the cultivation of sobriety, docility, and meekness.

Almy, Anna: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1811 Nov. 28
2p.
Box 1: 9

Friendship, gratitude, love.

Almy, Anna: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1812 Nov. 14
4p.
Box 2: 7
Almy, William: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1817 Apr. 9
1p.
Box 1: 9

Wishing him good health.

Almy, William: Letter to Thomas Howland (Cranston, R.I.)
1823 May 2
1p.
Box 1: 9
Anthony, James G.: Letter to Daniel Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1838 Sept. 10
1p.
Box 1: 16

Looking to purchase iron kettles.

Arnold, O.: Letter to Daniel Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1770 June 11
1p.
Box 1: 1
Arnold, Samuel?: Letter to John G. Jackson (Providence, R.I.)
1820 Jan. 9
2p.
Box 2: 7

Relaying news of the death of his father.

Arnold, Stephen: Letter to Daniel Howland
1773 Dec. 20
2p.
Box 2: 7

Religious thoughts on the Psalm of David and Murray's doctrine.

Barker, Francis: Letter to Daniel Howland
1783 Nov. 17
1p.
Box 1: 4

Sends greetings.

Bassett, William: Letter to Thomas Howland (Lynn, Mass.)
1839 Oct. 28
3p.
Box 2: 7

Denies that a pamphlet was laid before the Meeting for Sufferings; complains of never being given an interview with the committee prior to its reaching a conclusion: "If I understand it, I am virtually charged before the Society with an immorality, & thereby considered by some of my fellow-members as disqualified for any service in it, & yet not allowed the privilege of meeting the charge."

Bettle, Edward: Letter to Thomas Howland (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1829 Oct. 27
2p.
Box 1: 6

Inquiring whether Elias Hicks conveyed copies of D.B. Slack's Celestial Magnet.

Brackett, E.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Limington, Me.)
1825 May 24
3p.
Box 2: 7

Wishes for social connection with Friends; many deaths locally of late.

Theological reflections.

Briggs, Yelverton, Phoebe Briggs, and Stephen Walker: Deed to Ezekiel Whitford (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1792 Mar. 19
1p.
Box 1: 1
Brown, Thomas: A memorandum of some expression that dropt from my highly esteemed brother Thomas Brown in his last illness...
undated
2p.
Box 2: 7
Campbell, Archibald: Declaration in case of Alexander Hopkins v. John Love in Inferior Court of Common Pleas
1765 Sept.
1p.
Box 1: 2
Case, May C.: Letter to Deborah Howland
1846 Feb. 15
3p.
Box 1: 24

Death of Thomas Howland.

Chaloner, Philadelphia: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1806 Mar. 29
2p.
Box 1: 7

Family news.

Chaloner, Philadelphia: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1809 Dec. 17-1810 Jan. 1
2p.
Box 1: 7

Longing to see family.

Chaloner, Philadelphia: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1811 Aug.
1p.
Box 1: 7

Recently relocated, little to report.

Chaloner, Philadelphia: Letter to Thomas Howland (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1823 Oct.
2p.
Box 1: 7

Family news, homesickness.

Chase, S. A.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Salem, Mass.)
1821 Oct. 28
3p.
Box 2: 7

Concern for Thomas's health and hopes he is improving; tensions within the Salem Monthly meeting and refusal of those out of spirit to remove themselves: "The meetings were scenes of great clamour and cofnusion, & friends were accused of very many grevious things...."

Comstock, Ezekiel: Invoice to Daniel Howland
1825 Feb. 5
1p.
Box 1: 11

Invoice for medical care of Howland's wife.

Comstock, Nathan: Letter to Thomas Howland and S. A. Chase (New York, N.Y.)
1821 June 29
1p.
Box 2: 1

On complaints from his son George on the severity of discipline at the Friends Boarding School.

Cox, Mary M.: Letter to Daniel Howland (Pleasantville, Pa.)
1845 Jan. 13
3p.
Box 1: 16

Letter from cousin sending account of last 22 years living in Bucks County.

Davis, Nicholas: Letter to Phoebe Tucker (Marlborough, Pa.)
1727 Nov. 11
2p.
Box 1: 1

Regarding his ministry in Pennsylvania: "we have had thirty nine meetings in this provence of pensilvania & very kind & tenderly reserved & not one word of opposetion or contradiction but have exprest there grate satisfaction in our visit of love & in our plane habit and some have said (not in our hering) that they did not think ther ware such a man in Newengland for he is a workman that need not be ashamed. There has been grate flockings after us to meetings..."

Day, Mahlon: Letter to Thomas Howland (New York, N.Y.)
1842 July 26
1p.
Box 1: 15

Settlement of debt of Christopher Spencer.

Dillwyn, George: Letter to Daniel Howland (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1783 Dec. 20
1p.
Box 2: 7

Sorry to hear that T.D. still seems willing to stir up new occasions for offense.

Dow, Abraham: Poem: On candour
1829 Dec. 29
1p.
Box 2: 7
Dow, Dorcas and Harriet: Resignation from Falmouth Monthly Meeting
1837 Nov. 13
2p.
Box 1: 21

Resignation from Falmouth Meeting over expulsion of their father.

East Greenwich (Town : R.I.): Specifications for schoolhouse construction
1833 Nov. 2
2p.
Box 1: 15

Includes sketch of writing desks and school room.

East Greenwich (Town : R.I.): Town meeting minutes (extract)
1834 Nov. 25
1p.
Box 1: 15

Authorizing enlargement of public school house; admission of students.

Eldred, William: Case of William Eldred v. Charles Rice
1765
4p.
Box 1: 2

Proceedings in case of Eldred v. Rice, retained by Daniel Howland as Clerk

Eldredge, Charles: Letter to Thomas Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1821 Aug. 5
2p.
Box 1: 6

Financial matters.

Field, Phebe: Letter to Daniel Howland (Hudson, N.Y.)
1792 June 4
2p.
Box 2: 7
Fish, Aner: Letter to Thomas Howland (Portsmouth, R.I.)
1815 Aug. 5
2p.
Box 2: 7
Folger, P. H.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1819 June 1
1p.
Box 1: 11
Folger, P. H.: Letter to Thomas Howland
1824 Sept. 17
1p.
Box 1: 11
G., D. and M.M.: Letter to Thomas Howland
1820 Dec. 1
3p.
Box 1: 6

On education at the Moses Brown School.

News of John Wilbur traveling in England.

News of William Rickman, now 90 years old, Thomas Shillitoe and others.

On dissension and strife within the Yearly Meeting.

Greene, Edward A.: Letter to father
1875 Aug. 15
3p.
Box 1: 23

Regarding case before the RI Supreme Court.

Greene, Lydia: Letter to Sally (Alexandria)
undated
2p.
Box 1: 23

Family news.

Greene, Thomas A.: Letter to Thomas Howland
1819 July 17
3p.
Box 1: 6

Preaching of Elizabeth Walker.

Hazard, J. P.: Letter to Thomas Howland (South Kingston, R.I.)
1823 Feb. 10
1p.
Box 1: 6

Settling disputes (Howland's draft reply on verso).

Hazard, Thomas: Letter to Daniel Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1799 Feb. 4
1p.
Box 1: 4

Sale of cider.

Hopkins, Samuel: Letter to Daniel Howland (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1785 Mar. 12
2p.
Box 1: 4

On the education of children.

Howland: Accounts and invoice
ca.1837
5 items
Box 1: 20
Howland & Franklin: Letter to Daniel Howland
1849 Apr. 21
1p.
Box 1: 16
Howland, D.: On slavery, a poem
1807
2p.
Box 1: 8

Long poem attributed to D. H., possibly Daniel Howland.

Howland, Daniel: Indenture with Benjamin Gorton for L 1,125
1759 May 25
1p.
Box 1: 1
Howland, Daniel: Receipts and miscellaneous
1760-1782
6 items
Box 1: 1
Howland, Daniel: List of executions issued
1767-1770
5 items
Box 1: 2
Howland, Daniel: Summons for Jonathan Comstock et al.
1770 Jan. 10
1p.
Box 1: 2
Howland, Daniel: Warrant for the arrest of Caleb Gorton
1771 Dec. 8
1p.
Box 1: 2
Howland, Daniel: Account with estate opf Richard Greene
1772-1779
1p.
Box 1: 1
Howland, Daniel: Draft letter to unidentified (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1781 Apr. 11
2p.
Box 2: 7
Howland, Daniel: Draft letter to Samuel Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1785 Mar. 25
2p.
Box 1: 4

On the conduct of family.

Howland, Daniel: Account with Samuel Tripp
1786-1796
2p.
Box 1: 1
Howland, Daniel: Letter to Moses Brown (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1797 May 18
1p.
Box 2: 7

Inquiring whether Friends should indidivually or as a group speak to prospective changes in the state militia bill.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Dr. Jerould (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1798 Apr. 13
1p.
Box 2: 7

Wishes Jerould to see his son Daniel's ill daughter.

Howland, Daniel: Draft letter to John Casey (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1798 May 24
2p.
Box 2: 7

Concerns over attached writing (not present) that casts aspersions on the Society.

Howland, Daniel: Draft letter to John Casey (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1798 May 24
2p.
Box 2: 7
Howland, Daniel: Draft letter to Richard Greene Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1816 Aug. 27
2p.
Box 2: 7

Recently returned from large Quarterly meeting at Lynn; return journey.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Richard Greene Howland and siblings (New York, N.Y.)
1818 Apr. 13
3p.
Box 2: 7

Visit to New York.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Thomas Howland (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1818 May 3
1p.
Box 2: 7

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Thomas Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1819 Aug. 17
3p.
Box 2: 7

News of family, friends, and meeting.

Howland, Daniel: Agreement with Christopher Coggeshall (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1819 Mar. 20
1p.
Box 1: 11

Lease of house for one year.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Thomas Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1820 June 23
2p.
Box 2: 7
Howland, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (New Orleans, La.)
1827 Dec. 1
2p.
Box 1: 15

Hopes for better business in near future; sugar.

Howland, Daniel: Business correspondence
1828-1843
24 items
Box 1: 15

Mostly relating to Franklin & Howland

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1829 Nov. 23
2p.
Box 1: 16

Wishing well for his son in his efforts in New Orleans; farm news, Spot has died after a sickness; Anthony Hall was injured when thrown from a wagon.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Isaac Lawton (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1832 May 3
1p.
Box 1: 4

Regretful look back on his life.

Howland, Daniel: Letter to Thomas Howland (New York, N.Y.)
1840 Apr. 16
2p.
Box 1: 7

On the death of his mother.

Howland, Daniel: Receipts and accounts
1858
46 items
Box 1: 26
Howland, Deborah: Letter to Daniel Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1824 Aug. 10
2p.
Box 1: 16

Letter to brother Daniel: death of Aunt Ruth.

Howland, Joseph: Letter to Thomas Howland (Coventry)
1815 Apr. 19
3p.
Box 1: 10

On the divinity of Jesus: from Thomas' nephew.

Howland, Joseph: Letter to Thomas Howland (Newport, R.I.)
1817 Jan. 10
1p.
Box 1: 7

From nephew Joseph: teaching school.

Howland, Joseph: Letter to Daniel Howland
undated
1p.
Box 1: 10

Asks his father's permission to marry Hannah Fry, daughter of Joseph Fry.

Howland, Lucianna: Will
1817 Oct. 23
2p.
Box 1: 11
Howland, Richard Greene: Letter to Daniel Howland (Charleston, S.C.)
1840
3p.
Box 2: 7

Instructions for trees and ice house.

Howland, Richard Greene: Letter to Daniel and Sarah Howland
ca.1884
2p. (incomplete)
Box 1: 23

Possibilities of remarriage after death of his wife to Alice Sisson (Howland married Sisson after the death of his wife Isabella in 1884).

Howland, Richard Greene: Letter to Thomas Howland (Baltimore, Md.)
1827 Nov. 24
4p.
Box 1: 7

Yearly Meeting in Baltimore.

Howland, Richard Greene: Letter to Danie Howland (Baltimore, Md.)
1838 Mar. 27
2p.
Box 2: 7

Instructions for the farm.

Howland, Richard Greene: Letter to Daniel Howland (Charleston, S.C.)
1839 Feb. 16
2p.
Box 1: 16

Going into the mulberry business.

Howland, Richard Greene: Letter to Daniel Howland (Charleston, S.C.)
1841 Dec. 28
3p.
Box 1: 16

Letter to brother Daniel: economy in Charleston depressed; seeking opportunities in cotton, ice.

Controversy over John Wilbur and J.J. Gurney; unsound doctrine; separation.

Howland, Thomas: Draft letter to Esteemed friend (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1803
2p.
Box 2: 7

Sorry to hear of a Rhode Island congressman involved in a duel.

Howland, Thomas: Draft letter to Edward C. Delevan
1833
2p.
Box 1: 18

Regarding Friends' position on temperance.

Howland, Thomas: On temperance associations &c.
1833
4p.
Box 1: 18

Essay on Friends' support for the temperance cause.

Howland, Thomas: Letter to William Bassett
1839
2p.
Box 1: 22

Regarding his case before the Meeting for Sufferings for publishing a pamphlet contrary to the discipline. Bassett was a noted immediatist abolitionist.

Howland, Thomas: Letter to William Bassett
ca.1839
2p.
Box 1: 22

Bassett's pamphlet was brought up before the Meeting for Sufferings for statements made about the Society and its stance on slavery.

Lines "on the state of our Religious Society" and the conflict over J.J. Gurney and John Wilbur in meetings in New England and Rhode Island.

Howland, Thomas: Draft letter to J. P. (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1830 Apr. 11
4p.
Box 2: 7

Reaction to author's address to the Bible Association of Friends in America, questioning its approach and necessity though not the ends.

Death of brother William Almy; thoughts on attacks on Bates.

Friends' response to the controversy between John Wilbur and J.J. Gurney.

Howland, Thomas (?): Fragments and unidentified
1820-1844
8 items
Box 1: 12

Includes biographical essay on Moses Brown; D.B. Slack's Celestial Magnet.

Howland, Thomas?: Essay of address to the various denominations of Christians in New England
1836
3p.
Box 2: 7

Docketed: "Original essay of adddress &c. on the subject of slavery

Howland, Thomas?: Society of Friends and slavery
ca.1840
2p.
Box 2: 7

Essay (incomplete?) on the history of the Society of Friends and slavery.

Howland, Thomas?: Letter to Respected friend (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1781 July 1
3p.
Box 2: 7

Essay against war.

Howland, Thomas?: Draft letter to friend and kinswoman (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1815 May 19
2p.
Box 2: 7
Howland, Thomas?: Essay responding to question of whether the Society of Friends have ever been "full abolitionists"
ca.1839?
2p.
Box 2: 7

Possibly a response to William Bassett.

Howland, Thomas?: Letter to unidentified
undated
4p. (incomplete)
Box 2: 7
Jenkins, Anna A.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Wareham, Mass.)
1837 Mar. 3
3p. (mangled)
Box 1: 6
Jenkins, William: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1839 Feb. 9
3p.
Box 1: 6

Teachers at Moses Brown School were all engaged for another year.

King, Susan: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1835 Sept. 19
1p.
Box 1: 11

Requests assistance in selling a wood lot.

Does not wish to be considered harsh and severe in misunderstandings over their positions on J.J. Gurney and John Wilbur.

Knight, William A.: Letter to wife (Camp Sprague, Washington, D.C.)
1861 July 1
4p.
Box 1: 23

Military life in the defences of Washington; love for Col. Ambrose E. Burnside.

Knight, William A.: Letter to wife (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
1861 Oct.
3p.
Box 1: 23

En route to Washington with troops. Knight was a private in the 1st R.I. Infantry (3 months) and 4th R.I. Infantry.

Knight, William A.: Letter to brother and sister (Brussels, Belgium)
1870 June 1
4p.
Box 2: 7

Travel in Europe.

Knight, William A.: Letter to brother and sister (Brussels, Belgium)
1870 Oct. 23
4p.
Box 2: 7

Travel in Europe.

Knight, William A.: Letter to siblings (London, England)
1870 Oct. 27
3p.
Box 1: 23

Travel to London, news in Franco-Prussian War.

Knight, William A.: Letter to brother and sister (Rome, Italy)
1870 Oct. 3
4p.
Box 2: 7

Travel in Italy.

Knight, William A.: Letter to brother Frank (Heidelberg, Germany)
1886 Oct. 5
4p. (incomplete)
Box :

Travels in Germany.

Knight, William A.?: Letter to 'Aborr'
1860 Aug. 16
2p.
Box 2: 7
Lawton, Hannah: Poem: The 104th Psalm transposed
ca.1820
2p.
Box 2: 7
Mary, Paul: Letter to Thomas Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1821 Mar. 19
1p.
Box 2: 7

Nantucket Overseers of the Poor believe that Alexander Clasby's time at Boarding School has expired and which him returned home.

Miscellaneous and fragmentary material
1810-1880
15 items
Box 2: 6
Miscellaneous receipts and accounts: Daniel Howland, Arthur Knight, William A. Knight
1851-1883
14 items
Box 1: 25

Includes elaborate estimate Union Steam and Water for installation of steam heating system in William A. Knight's house, 1874

Mitchell, Joseph: Letter to Daniel Howland (Rhode Island)
1781 Aug. 15
2p.
Box 1: 4
Mitchell, Joseph: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1785 Aug. 12
1p.
Box 1: 1

Re: sale of leather.

Mott, Richard: Letter to Thomas Howland (Mamaroneck, N.Y.)
1790 Sept. 30
2p.
Box 1: 6

Gratitude fo his father's hospitality.

Murray, Mary: Letter to Thomas Howland (New York, N.Y.)
1838 Apr. 14
4p.
Box 1: 6

Antislavery activity: wishes all Friends shared Thomas' views; reading Sturge on post-manumission in the Caribbean. Orphan Asylum.

Neff, Harmanus: Printed letter to Alfred C. Eddy (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1875 July 1
1p.
Box 2: 7

Humorous notice in olde-style that he is unable to attend the "Merchants Annual Clam Roaste" at the Bondholders Club, Pawtuxent, and sad he miss our on "they Friede Fishes and Chowdere, amd thy Roasted Clams with Fixings."

Pearce, Elizabeth: Letter to East Greenwich Monthly Meeting (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1834 Sept. 24
1p.
Box 2: 6

Wishes to be considered for membership in the meeting.

Richard Mott visit ending; vindication of Richard Ball (evnagelical Quaker, later to become Brethren); boarding school is faring well; have not received Garrison's Liberator for three months, but fears the cause is foundering, with lectures and petitions to congress having little effect.

J.J. Gurney and the state of the Society. Abolitionism, reform, and true Christianity: "a person confessing the Christian name & does not acknowledge Slavery a sin and as such ought to be abolished is wanting in one of the essentials of vital Christianty -- I met with none who use the name as a mask, tho there may be some solitary apostates... but on the contrary those who have entered the ranks & plead for that class who according to the decisions of the highest legislative body of this mighty Republic have no rights to petition for themselves are among the most virtuous, the most benevolent, the philanthropist of the day..." Has not seen William Bassett's letter; Sarah Grimke; sees no parallel between using the meetinghouse for a lecture on antislavery and the mob at Alton.

Pierce, A.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Pleasantville, N.Y.)
1839 Oct. 4
4p.
Box 1: 6

Has acquired a farm. Abolition: awaiting a response to Samuel Philbrick's attack on Gurney and the Yearly Meeting; snide comments on E. Cresson's continued lecturing on colonization, which has never benefitted the enslaved or Aborigine: "The only just way is to give freedom, pay the laborer, raise the degraded to the status of men, educate, treat them as heirs of immortality."

Antislavery activity: Abby Kelley: "I met with A.K. a year previous & expressed my regret at her measures. She appears to be sincere in her movements, but I think her sadly mistaken. She has separated from Society., we may regret her course but unable to change her views... It is a day of much conflict from the highest tribunals in our land to the lowest peasant. We discover great discordances, & we hope some benefit may be derived from development of many facts, long buried in silence. The late decision in the United St. Court [Prigg v. Pennsylvania] relative to fugitive slaves has had a great tendency to stir up the public mind at the [illeg] for an amendment of the Constitution or repeal of the Union. One thing I greatly desire that war may not be the consequence..."

Potter, Benjamin D.: Letter to Daniel Howland (Cranston, R.I.)
1837 Apr. 14
2p.
Box 2: 7
Purinton, L.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1821 Aug. 23
4p.
Box 2: 7

On J.J. Gurney.

Robinson, Thomas: Letter to Daniel Howland (Newport, R.I.)
1789 July 15
2p.
Box 2: 1

"After much pains and difficulty, we have bailed from Prison, the barer, Rober, a negro man, who was unjustly committed by Godfrey Winwood, as there is such a strong combination in this Town against the measures of the Society, and there appears so much bitterness in the People in this case. I did not think it safe to continue him in Town the ensuing night, and have hired a boat to carry him as far as Greenwich, on his way to Providence..."

Robinson, W. A.: Letter to Daniel Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1830 Mar. 27
1p.
Box 1: 16
Rodman, B.: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1819 Sept. 22
4p.
Box 2: 7
Rodman, Benjamin: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1820 May
4p.
Box 1: 6

Defends himself against the words of others.

Rodman, Benjamin: Letter to Thomas Howland (Washington, D.C.)
1826 Mar. 14
4p.
Box 1: 6

Politics in Washington: "I write in the opinion express'd by every man I have seen from the north & the candid from the south, as far they date deny their practice -- that slavery is a cause that shows its influence in destroying everything it touches: in fact, tis a mildew & rust that blights the face of every part of the country where it is suffered..."; Missouri question; much more.

Rodman, Benjamin: Letter to Thomas Howland
1828 Apr.
1p.
Box 2: 7
Rodman, Benjamin?: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1821 Feb. 18
4p. (incomplete)
Box 2: 7

Discourse on disputation of philosophy of mind.

Rodman, Benjamin?: Poem: Farewell out friend...
undated
Box 2: 7

Docketed: "Address B.R. by his Friends... leaving school."

Rodman, E.: Letter to Thomas Howland (Newport, R.I.)
1821 Feb. 8
1p.
Box 1: 6
Rotch, Benjamin: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1782 May 28
2p.
Box 1: 3

Return to Nantucket.

Rotch, William: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1780 May 10
3p.
Box 1: 3
Rotch, William: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1780 May 10
2p.
Box 1: 3

Condolences on loss of his son.

Rotch, William: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1781 Dec. 24
3p.
Box 1: 3

Mobbing of Friends houses in Philadelphia for not illuminating after Yorktown.

Rotch, William: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1782 Jan.
3p.
Box 1: 3

Account of melancholy loss of Robert Barker and others attempting to rescue their ship stuck on a bar during a storm.

Rotch, William: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1782 Sept. 21
3p.
Box 1: 3

Been to Boston "to remove the prejudices, so prevalent at this time against us, though with very little cause." Includes Howland's reply.

Rotch, William: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1783 Aug. 30
2p.
Box 1: 3

On business prospects for Daniel, Jr.

Salisbury, Henry T.: Loan from Zenas Coffin (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1822 Oct. 20
1p.
Box 1: 11
Seward, Miss: Enigma
1820
1p.
Box 2: 7

A form of riddle.

Shearman, Abraham, Jr.: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1819 Sept. 28
4p.
Box 2: 7

Interest in the institution (the Boarding School) has not waned.

Disapproval of recent publication by D. B. Slack [The Celestial Magnet].

Saltmaking in Yarmouth; musings on adaptability of the body, life.

Remarks on slavery, the Tract Society, and Elisha Bates' book on Baptism: "the time has very nearly, if not quite arrived, in which it may be incumbent on our Society again, in some way, to appear before the public, as the friends and advocates of the oppressed African race, and at the same time, declaring our belief of the utter inconsistency of Slavery with the benign precepts and spirit of the Christian religion..."

Revisions to his statement on slavery.

Impact and experience of depression on his body. Slavery. Baptism.

Review of the new paper, The Reformer, issued at Worcester by Joseph S. Wall.

Copy of letter over controversies in Yearly Meeting and departure from the discipline of the Society into disunion and schism over the handling of John Wilbur and another Friend.

Smith, Frederick: The following is an extraordinary instance of the goodness, and the power of omnipotence, to one of his benighted children...
undated
5p.
Box 2: 7
Starbuck, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1782 Dec. 19
1p.
Box 1: 5

Complaints about restrictions on whaling industry.

Starbuck, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1782 Jan. 26
1p.
Box 1: 5

Attended Quarterly and met with many friends.

Starbuck, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1783 Jan. 17
1p.
Box 1: 5
Starbuck, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1783 Sept. 17
1p.
Box 1: 5

Business poor; new daughter.

Starbuck, Daniel: Letter to Daniel Howland (Nantucket, Mass.)
1787 May 10
1p.
Box 1: 5

Shipping a barrel of beef.

Stark, Benjamin: Letter to unidentified (New London, Conn.)
1873 June 16
4p.
Box 2: 7

Chase family genealogy.

Stewardson, Thomas: Letter to Thomas Howland (Philadelphia, Pa.)
1827 Oct. 30
4p.
Box 2: 7

Report on the Hicksite Yearly Meeting: "it is very evident they avoided bringing any important subject into view for if they had, the leaders must have been aware that great diversity of opinion would have been manifested; turmoil in Indiana and Ohio Yearlies.

Congressman Tillinghast on politics un Jackson; use of bloodhounds against the Seminoles in Florida: "the ground of defence now taken for this measure is that the hounds are to be used for indication & chase, but not for slaughter... It is humiliating and debasing..."

Tobey, Samuel Boyd: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1823 Apr. 7
3p.
Box 1: 14

Issues with teachers at the Moses Brown School. Visiting Friends.

Tobey, Samuel Boyd: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1826 Mar. 5
4p.
Box 1: 14

Moses Brown School.

Health; Moses Brown School matters; Isaac Crowdson's Beacon to the Society of Friends.

Long discourse on Elisha Bates, the Society, and his Remarks on Baptism (1836)

Matters at the school in the aftermath of their friend Moses Brown.

Thomas Evans writes that he has been indicted on a felony in Richmond, Va., for distributing antislavery literature; J.J Gurney will be visiting America shortly; mourns over course taken by Sarah and Angelina Grimke. Abolition activity among Friends.

Tobey, Samuel Boyd: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1837 Oct. 10
2p.
Box 1: 14

Concerning the controversy over William Bassett's pamphlet and contention that Friends are not sufficiently antislavery because they do not support abolitionists in all matters.

Tobey, Samuel Boyd: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1839 Feb. 11
4p.
Box 1: 14

Two boys cited for profane behavior at Moses Brown School. William Bassett's pamphlet and discipline within the Yearly. Schools.

Tobey, Samuel Boyd: Letter to Thomas Howland (Providence, R.I.)
1839 Nov. 29
1p.
Box 1: 14

Concerning an essay on Moses Brown.

Wilburite disturbances at men;s and women's meetings in Providence.

Unidentified author: Circular graphic of Rhode Island Yearly Meeting
ca.1800
1p.
Box 2: 1
Unidentified author: To the memory of Richard Jordan
1827
1p.
Box 1: 8

Poem commemorating Richard Jordan.

Unidentified author: An account of the memorable deliverance of James Dickinson and Jane Pearon
ca.1845
4p.
Box 1: 18

Narrative of of Dickinson and Pearon during a religious visit to Scotland and their escape from a family of murderers.

Unidentified author: Genealogical information
Box 1: 27
Unidentified author: Letter to Thomas Howland? (Providence, R.I.)
1822 Feb. 24
4p. (incomplete)
Box 1: 12

Tumult at Lynn meeting between "New Light" and "Old Light" factions, with John Allen arming himself with a sword (symboplically).

Unidentified author: Letter to Thomas Howland (New Bedford, Mass.)
1829 Feb. 25
8p. (incomplete)
Box 2: 7

Passionate response to being censured for slandering friends.

Unidentified author: Extract on Christian dispensation
undated
3p.
Box 2: 1
Unidentified author: Note of controversy over issuance of paper currency in Rhode Island
undated
2p.
Box 2: 7
Unidentified author: Poem: Address to Peace, Hail welcome messenger, all hail!
undated
2p.
Box 2: 7
Unidentified author: Poem: 'Farewell my Friends whose minds are form'd...'
undated
1p.
Box 2: 7
Unidentified author: Poetical fragment
undated
1p.
Box 1: 8
Waterman, Resolved: Letter to Thomas Howland (Savannah, Ga.)
1826 Mar. 23
2p.
Box 1: 6

Cotton prices strong; agitation in Georgia over governor's policy toward Creek Indians.

Weaver, Sarah: Deed to Daniel Howland (East Greenwich, R.I.)
1751 Sept. 2
1p.
Box 1: 1

Transfer of property (the Weaver-Howland house) to Howland, signed by Weaver with a mark.

Series 2. Friends business
1777-1838
Answers to Queries from Monthly Meetings
1777-1787
82 items
Answers to Queries: Coakset
1777 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Coakset
1778 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Coakset
1780 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Coakset
1787 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Cranston
1781 Jan.
1p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Cranston (Women)
1782 July
3p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
undated
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1777 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1777 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1778 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1779 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1782 Oct.
3p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1783 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1784 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1785 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1785 July
3p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Dartmouth
1787 Oct.
4p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: East Greenwich
1779 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: East Greenwich
1781 Oct.
1p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: East Greenwich
1782 Oct.
1p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: East Greenwich
1784 Apr.
5p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: East Greenwich
1787 Oct.
3p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
undated
6p.
Box 2: 6
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1780 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1783 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1783 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1783 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1784 July
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1785 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Greenwich
1785 July
1p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Nantucket
1781 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Newport
1783 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Newport
1785 Mar.
4p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Newport
1787 Sept.
4p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Newport
1788 Mar.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Portsmouth
1780 Dec.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Portsmouth
1782 Dec.
1p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Portsmouth
1782 Dec.
3p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Providence
1784 Apr.
4p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Providence
1785 Jan.
3p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Providence
1787 Oct. 2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Providence
1787 Dec.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Richmond
1779 Dec.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Richmond
1781 Mar.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Richmond
1783 Dec.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1777 Mar.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1778 June
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1779 June
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1780 June
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1782 Mar.
1p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1783 June
3p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1784 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1784 June
3p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1784 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1787 Oct.
3p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Smithfield
1787 Dec.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Smithfield for Providence
1785 Dec.
4p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Smithfield for Providence
1787 Dec.
1p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1778 June
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1779 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1780 June
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1780 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1784 July
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1785 June
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: South Kingston
1785 Sept.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1779 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1779 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 2
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1780 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1781 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1783 Jan.
1p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1783 Oct.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1784 Apr.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1784 July
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1785 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1788 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Swansea
1788 July
2p.
Box 2: 4
Box :
Answers to Queries: Uxbridge
1784 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 3
Answers to Queries: Uxbridge
1784 Apr.
4p.
Box 2: 1
Answers to Queries: Uxbridge
1786 Jan.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Uxbridge
1787 Dec.
2p.
Box 2: 4
Answers to Queries: Uxbridge
undated
2p.
Box 2: 4
East Greenwich Monthly Meeting. Ministers and Elders: Answers to queries
1802 July
2p.
Box 2: 5
East Greenwich Monthly Meeting. Ministers and Elders: Answers to queries
1813 Oc.
2p.
Box 2: 5
East Greenwich Monthly Meeting. Ministers and Elders: Answers to queries
1817 Feb.
2p.
Box 2: 5
East Greenwich Monthly Meeting. Ministers and Elders: Answers to queries
1819 Jan.
4p.
Box 2: 5
NEYM. School Committee: Appointing committee to take ownership of property bequeathed by Sylvester Wickes
1824 Aug. 6
1p.
Box 2: 6
NEYM. Meeting for Sufferings: Appointing committee to take ownership of property bequeathed by Sylvester Wickes for the benefit of charity scholars at the Boarding School
1824 Aug. 4
1p.
Box 2: 6
Rhode Island Yearly Meeting: Appointing Friends to visit subordinate meetings
1837 June
1p.
Box 2: 6
Cranston Monthly Meeting notes
undated
2p.
Box 2: 6
Rhode Island Yearly Meeting: Disownment of Josiah Dow
1837 Oct. 26
1p.
Box 1: 21

Disownment of Dow and expulsion from Falmouth Monthly for lessening and injuring the character of Oliver and Lydia Dennett.

London Yearly Meeting: Epistle from the Yearly Meeting Held in London [printed]
1838
4p.
Box 2: 6
Greenwich Monthly Meeting: Letter to Creek Monthly Meeting
1795 May 2
1p.
Box 2: 6

Regarding transfer of David Sands.

Providence Monthly Meeting
1781 Feb. 25
1p.
Box 2: 6

Warning by visiting Carolina Friends (David Brooks, John Foreman, Thomas Scattergood) that the sword is drawn and Providence must repent.

Rhode Island Quarterly Meeting: Providence Monthly Meeting: report on proposal to enlarge the meetinghouse
undated
1p.
Box 2: 6
Rhode Island Yearly Meeting: Statement on disownment of Josiah Dow
ca.1837 Oct. 26
1p.
Box 1: 21

Administrative information

Access

The collection is open for research.

Language:

English

Provenance

Part of the Records of the New England Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends, acquired April 2016.

Processing Information

Processed by I. Eliot Wentworth, Aug. 2016.

Bibliography

Greene, Daniel Howland, History of the Town of East Greenwich and Adjacent Territory: From 1677 to 1877. Providence, R.I.: J.A. and R.A. Reid, 1877.

Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island, vol. 1. Chicago: J.H. Beers, 1908.

Howland Genealogy

Bold italics= appears in collection

  • Daniel (3) Howland (1724-1802) and Philadelphia Brownell (1726-1810)
    • Mercy Howland (1745-1824) m. Gideon Greene
    • Lucianna Howland (1747-1817)
    • Ruth Howland (1749-1824)
    • Benjamin Howland (1752-1834) m. Elizabeth Spencer
    • Daniel (4) Howland (1754-1834) m. Sarah Greene
      • Deborah G. Howland (1795-1876)
      • Daniel (5) Howland (1797-1871) m. Abigail Susan Greene
        • Sarah Greene Howland (1836-1878)
        • Daniel Howland (1838-1863)
        • Mary Howland (1843-1912) m. Arthur Knight(1855-1921)
        • Abby Susan Howland (1854-1881) m. Arthur Knight (1855-1921)
      • Richard Greene Howland (1799-1874) m. Isabella J. Allen (1843-1884) and Alice Marie Sisson (1856-1935)
      • Anna Howland (1801-1865)
    • Philadelphia Howland (1757-1826) m. Job Chaloner
    • Judith Howland (1759-1826)
    • Joseph Howland (b.1761) m. Hannah Fry
    • Thomas Howland (1764-1845)
    • George Howland (1773-1779)

Copyright and Use (More informationConnect to publication information)

Cite as: Howland Family Papers (MS 923). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries.

Search terms

Subjects

  • Antislavery movements--Rhode Island
  • East Greenwich (R.I.)--History
  • Peace movements--Rhode Island
  • Quakers--New England--History
  • Temperance--Rhode Island

Link to similar SCUA collections

Names

  • Bassett, William, 1803-1871
  • Brown, Moses, 1738-1836
  • Friends' Boarding School (Providence, R.I.)
  • Gurney, Joseph John, 1788-1847
  • Howland, Daniel
  • Howland, Daniel, 1754-1834
  • Howland, Thomas, 1764-1845
  • Moses Brown School
  • New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
  • Shearman, Abraham, 1777-1847
  • Society of Friends--Controversial literature
  • Society of Friends--History
  • Tobey, Samuel Boyd, 1805-1867
  • Wilbur, John, 1774-1856

Genre terms

  • Correspondence
  • Poetry