Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection

All social change and cultural movements have their associated resources for the exchange of information, ideas, stories, and art. Particularly in the women’s movement, the effort to create newsletters, journals, and other forms of information dissemination was a proactive step taken to assert women’s stories and to locate the power of the press within women-run communities. These periodicals, both large and small in scale, reveal the ways women connected to each other and to larger spiritual and cultural concepts. Local artist, activist, and feminist Jay Goldspinner was engaged with many of these communities, particularly those characterizing the spiritual elements of the women’s liberation and feminist movements, and collected and saved their periodicals. Her collection includes journals focusing on feminist linguistics, goddess myths and spirituality, Wiccan and witch traditions, progressive politics, and women’s spirituality and community in local and international settings. Each is a unique window into discourses of women’s history, feminist movements, and social change work.

The Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection consists of issues of feminist and progressive periodicals, journals, and newsletters from four decades. The titles represented include: Always in Season, Goddessing, The Lonesome Node, The People’s Voice of Franklin County, Themis/Thesmophoria, Wicked Word, and an almost complete run, including the two indexes, of the seminal magazine of feminist spirituality, WomenSpirit.

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Background on Jay Goldspinner

1977 Spring Equinox cover of WomenSpirit.

1977 Spring Equinox cover of WomenSpirit.

All social change and cultural movements have their associated resources for the exchange of information, ideas, stories, and art. Particularly in the women’s movement, the effort to create newsletters, journals, and other forms of information dissemination was a proactive step taken to assert women’s stories and to locate the power of the press within women-run communities. These periodicals, both large and small in scale, reveal the ways women connected to each other and to larger spiritual and cultural concepts. Local artist, activist, and feminist Jay Goldspinner was engaged with many of these communities, particularly those characterizing the spiritual elements of the women’s liberation and feminist movements, and collected and saved their periodicals. Her collection includes journals focusing on feminist linguistics, goddess myths and spirituality, Wiccan and witch traditions, progressive politics, and women’s spirituality and community in local and international settings. Each is a unique window into discourses of women’s history, feminist movements, and social change work.

Contents of Collection

The Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection consists of issues of feminist and progressive periodicals, journals, and newsletters from four decades. The titles represented include:

Always in Season: Living in Sync with the Cycles, 9 issues from 1999-2001

  • Quarterly journal put out by Donna Henes, a ceremonial artist and urban shaman. The full run was 32 issues from 1999-2006.

Goddessing, 17 issues from 1993-2005

  • International women's spirituality newspaper put out by editor Willow LaMonte.

The Lonesome Node, 7 issues from 1992-1993

  • Newsletter published by the Ozark Center for Language Studies (OCLS) and written by linguist Suzette Haden Elgin (Patricia Anne Wilkins), known for her scholarly work in linguistics, the development of a feminist language called Láadan, and her publications in science fiction and other genres.

The People’s Voice of Franklin County, 26 issues from 2001-2012

  • Formerly The Franklin County Progressive Newsletter, a local newsletter put out by the Franklin County Progressive Network, based in Greenfield, MA.

Themis/Thesmophoria, 28 issues from 1979-1987

  • Newsletter put out by the Susan B. Anthony Coven, the first feminist, women-only, witches' coven, founded by Zsuzanna “Z” Budapest. The name was changed from Themis in 1981 after Budapest learned the name was covered by a sorority held copyright, but continued its numeration from that title into the new one.

Wicked Word, 7 issues from 1997-1999

  • Local Neopagan and Wiccan inspired newsletter put out by editor Mark Roblee, based in Shutesbury, MA.

WomenSpirit, 36 issues, plus a 1974-1984 Index issue, from 1974-1984

  • An almost complete run, including the two indexes, of the seminal magazine of feminist spirituality, WomenSpirit, produced by a transient group of volunteer women, feminists, and lesbians who migrated through the home of editors Jean and Ruth Mountaingrove in southern Oregon. Printed quarterly through the decade 1974-1984, the magazine featured writings and art from women, covered women’s culture, spirituality, rituals, healing, life stages, feminism, politics and much more, and was international in scope and contributors.

Collection inventory
Always in Season: Living in Sync with the Cycles
1999-2001
Box 1: 1
Goddessing
1993-2005
Box 1: 2-6
The Lonesome Node
1992-1993
Box 1: 7
The People’s Voice of Franklin County
2001-2012
Box 1: 8-10
Themis/Thesmophoria
1979-1987
Box 1: 11
Wicked Word
1997-1999
Box 1: 12
WomenSpirit
1974-1984
Box 1: 13-22
WomenSpirit Index: A Comprehensive Guide to a Decade of Women's Spirituality 1974-1984
1984
Box 1: 23

Administrative information

Access

The collection is open for research.

Language:

English

Provenance

Gift of Jay Goldspinner, May 2016.

Processing Information

Processed by Blake Spitz, July 2016.

Copyright and Use (More informationConnect to publication information)

Cite as: Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection (MS 909). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries.

Search terms

Subjects

  • Feminism--Periodicals
  • Franklin County (Mass.)--Periodicals
  • Goddess religion--Periodicals
  • Neopaganism--Periodicals
  • Spiritual feminism--Periodicals
  • Wicca--Periodicals
  • Witchcraft--Periodicals
  • Women and spiritualism--Periodicals
  • Women's rights and spiritualism--Periodicals

Link to similar SCUA collections