The University of Massachusetts Amherst
Robert S. Cox Special Collections & University Archives Research Center
CredoResearch digital collections in Credo

Collecting area: Science & technology

Galinat, Walton C.

Walton C. Galinat Papers

ca. 1964-1991
4 boxes 6 linear feet
Call no.: FS 205
Herbarium - corn sample
Corn sample, Herbarium of Walt C. Galinat, 1971

Born in 1923 in Manchester, Connecticut, Walton Clarence Galinat was a corn enthusiast for almost his entire life. He worked with various aspects of corn in high school, as an undergraduate student assistant at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, in graduate school at the University of Wisconsin, as a research associate at Harvard University, and finally, as a professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he worked at the Waltham Field Station as a plant geneticist from 1964 until his retirement in 1990. A contributing author to more than 300 published papers, Galinat spent significant parts of his research career in Mexico studying ancient maize, but was also deeply embedded in New England farming and corn production and sustainability. In addition to his world-renowned research on corn evolution, morphology, and diversity, he is credited with the development of many varieties of corn, including Candy Stick, “airplane corn,” and a red, white, and blue kernel variety. His skill as an artist was also recognized across his field and beyond, with his articles often accompanied by beautifully detailed illustrations of corn samples, his widely distributed and used teaching illustrations, and with a few of his hand-drawn corn diagrams permanently displayed in the National Academies Building in Washington D.C. The Waltham Experiment Station building retains several of Galinat’s oversized 3D art models of corn plant migrations and lifecycles to this day. Amongst many honors, Galinat was awarded the prestigious Distinguished Economic Botanist Award from the Society for Economic Botany in 1994.

The Walton C. Galinat Papers document Galinat’s academic, service, research, and artistic work during his time at the Waltham Experiment Station while employed as a professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Roughly half the collection is administrative and professional materials, including correspondence; research files and journals, with numerous detailed hand-drawn illustrations; Experiment Station and Hatch annual reports and grants; UMass administrative memos, reports, and files; and photographs of corn samples as well as individuals from Experiment Station, Home Economics, and 4H clubs. The other half of the collection consists of three-dimensional corn display samples and pressed corn and grass from Galinat’s personal herbarium.

Retreived from Waltham Experiment Station (Waltham Field Community Farms), 2021

Subjects

Corn--GeneticsUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Environmental Sciences

Types of material

Herbaria (documents)
Gibbons, Ian R.

Ian R. Gibbons Papers

ca.1965-2018
3 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1069

The cell biologist and biophysicist Eugene R. Gibbons was widely noted for his discovery of microtubule-associated motor proteins. For his doctoral research at Cambridge University in 1957 , Gibbons used an electron microscope to analyze chromosomal organization during mitosis and meiosis, earning him a call from Harvard University to help establish an electron mcircoscopic laboratory. While working on Tetrahymena to answer the question of how simple proteins can push cells through the water, he isolated and described a motor protein he called dynein, which moves cargos along microtubules and powers ciliar and flagellar motility. Relocating to the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 1967 to become head of the Kewalo Marine Laboratory, and switching his organismal focus to sea urchin sperm, he and his collaborator and wife, Barbara, contined to make fundamental contributions to understanding the role of microtubule sliding in ciliar motility. Gibbons shared the Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine with Ron Vale (2017) and the E.B. Wilson Medal from the American Society of Cell Biology (1994). He died in January 2018 at the age of 86.

The Gibbons papers contain two boxes of laboratory notebooks, a box of his offprints with a small quantity of correspondence. A collection of Gustaf Retzius’s periodical Biologische Untersuchungen (1890-1914) has been transferred to printed materials.

Gift of Wendy Gibbons, Mar. 2019

Subjects

Cell biologistsCilia and ciliary motionTetrahymena
Goessmann, Charles A. (Charles Anthony), 1827-1910

Charles A. Goessmann Papers

1850-1917
5.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 063
Depiction of Charles A. Goessmann, ca.1890
Charles A. Goessmann, ca.1890

German-born agricultural chemist, professor of Chemistry at the University of Massachusetts Amherst when it was known as Massachusetts Agricultural College, and President of the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists and the American Chemical Society who made several important contributions in nineteenth century chemistry and held at least four patents.

The Goessman collection includes correspondence (mostly professional), some with presidents of Massachusetts Agricultural College, William Smith Clark (1826-1886) and Henry Hill Goodell (1839-1905). Also contains handwritten drafts of addresses and articles, his dissertation, printed versions of published writings, handwritten lecture notes, class records, proposed college curricula, notes taken by students, handwritten research notes, newsclippings and offprints utilized in research, and biographical materials.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMassachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Chemistry

Contributors

Goessmann, Charles A. (Charles Anthony), 1827-1910
Goldfarb, Theodore D., 1935-

Theodore D. Goldfarb Collection

1978 June-July
389 digital images 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: PH 071
Part of: Science for the People Collection
Depiction of Oil processing plant machinery, June 1978
Oil processing plant machinery, June 1978

An environmental chemist, Ted Goldfarb was a founder of the Science for the People chapter at SUNY Stony Brook and an organizer of the group’s second trip to the People’s Republic of China in June 1978. The twelve delegates from SftP went with the intention of studying the organization of science and technology in China with respect to how it met people’s needs, and they were toured through a succession of factories, production facilities, farms, schools, and institutes in Guangzhou, Shanghai, Changsha, and Beijing, among other locations.

The nearly 400 slides in this collection were taken by Ted Goldfarb (and handful by his colleague Judith Weinstein) when they were members of the second Science for the People delegation to the People’s Republic of China in June 1978. Reflecting their interests in science and technology, the slides document a succession of factories, production facilities, schools, and institutes they visited, but include shots of typical street scenes, markets, artisans and factory workers, and tourist sites such as the Great Wall, Ming Tombs, and Forbidden City. In addition to the images of China, a handful were taken during a stopover in Delhi and Agra, India, on the way back to the United States.

Subjects

Acrobats--China--ShanghaiChina--PhotographsCotton manufacture--China--Shanghai--PhotographsFactories--China--PhotographsForbidden City (Beijing, China)--PhotographsGreat Wall of China (China)--PhotographsIndia--PhotographsMing Tombs (China)--PhotographsScience for the PeopleTextile factories--China--Shanghai--Photographs

Contributors

Weinstein, Judith

Types of material

Photographs
Goodale, Hubert Dana, 1879-1968

Hubert Dana Goodale Papers

1918-1978
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 918
Brass mouse head
Brass mouse-head stencil used in genetics work at Mount Hop Farm

An applied geneticist associated with Massachusetts Agricultural College and Mount Hope Farm, Hubert Dana Goodale made important contributions in poultry and dairy science.

The Goodale Papers contain correspondence written to Goodale, primarily by his friends and colleagues in poultry science, Al Lunn (Oregon Agricultural College), Loyal F. Payne (Kansas State), and John C. Graham (Mass. Agricultural College). Mixing both personal and professional content, the letters touch on academic life in post-World War I period and a variety of issues in poultry husbandry and genetics.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMount Hope Farm (Williamstown, Mass.)Poultry--BreedingPoultry--Genetics

Contributors

Graham, John G.Lunn, A. G. (Alfred Gunn), 1883-Payne, Loyal F. (Loyal Frederick), 1889-1970Prentice, E. Parmalee (Ezra Parmalee), 1863-1955

Types of material

Stencils
Gray, Asa, 1810-1888

Asa Gray, A pilgrimage to Torreya

1875
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 419 bd

The great botanist and early supporter of evolutionary theory, Asa Gray, toured the Florida Panhandle during the spring of 1875, making “a pious pilgrimage to the secluded native haunts of that rarest of trees, the Torreya taxifolia.” His journey took him along the Apalachicola River in search of Torreya, an native yew prized by horticulturists.

This slender manuscript account was prepared by Gray for publication in the American Agriculturist (vol. 43). In a light and graceful way, his “pilgrimage” describes the difficulties of travel in the deep south during the post-Civil War years and his exploits while botanizing. The text is edited in Gray’s hand and varies slightly from the published version.

Subjects

Florida--Description and travel--19th centuryYew

Contributors

Gray, Asa, 1810-1888
Hagar, Joseph A. (Joseph Archibald), 1896-1989

Joseph A. Hagar Papers

1897-1976 Bulk: 1930-1965
6 boxes 7.92 linear feet
Call no.: MS 743
Depiction of Hudsonian godwit hatchlings
Hudsonian godwit hatchlings

An ornithologist and conservationist for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Joseph A. “Archie” Hagar’s career was rooted in the generation of naturalists such as William Brewster, Edward Howe Forbush, and Arthur Cleveland Bent. Born in Lawrence, Mass., on May 13, 1896, Hagar’s undergraduate career at Harvard was interrupted by service in the First World War, after which he completed his studies at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, graduating with the class of 1921. An expert field biologist and ecologist, he was appointed State Ornithologist in the Department of Fish and Game in November 1934 serving in that position for almost twenty five years. A specialist in waterfowl and raptors, Hagar was deeply involved in early conservation efforts in New England, noted for his work on wetland conservation and for linking the use of DDT with eggshell thinning in peregrine falcons, and he was famously at the center of a dispute with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over the design of the Parker River Wildlife Refuge. Never a prolific writer, he was an active member of the American Ornithological Union, the Nuttall Ornithological Club, the Wildlife Society, and other professional organizations, and after retirement, he was specially cited for his work in waterfowl conservation by Ducks Unlimited. Active until late in life, he died at home in Marshfield Hills on Dec. 17, 1989.

The Hagar Papers are a deep and valuable resource for the study of New England birds and the growth of modern conservation biology. With abundant professional correspondence, field notes on shorebirds and raptors, and drafts of articles, the collection documents the full range of Hagar’s activities as State Ornithologist, including a particularly thick run of material for the controvery over the Parker River Wildlife Refuge. Hagar also acquired a set of field notes, 1897-1921, from the Harvard ornithologist John E. Thayer.

Subjects

Birds--MassachusettsBlack duckConservationists--MassachusettsMassachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnaeOrnithologists--MassachusettsParker River National Wildlife Refuge

Contributors

Hagar, Joseph A. (Joseph Archibald), 1896-1989

Types of material

Field notesLetters (Correspondence)Photographs
Hamilton, Tom Sherman, 1924-

Tom Sherman Hamilton Papers

1965-1979
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 065

The horticulturist Tom S. Hamilton was a member of the faculty at UMass Amherst in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning. A specialist in ornamental plants, Hamilton worked at UMass from prior to 1950 until his retirement in 1986.

The Hamilton Papers contain three works on ornamental plants published by the Dept. of Landscape Architecture, along with a mimeographed laboratory manual that Hamilton used in his courses on landscape operations in 1979.

Subjects

HorticultureUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning

Contributors

Hamilton, Tom Sherman, 1923-
Hertzbach, Stanley S.

Stanley S. Hertzbach Papers

1977-2002
1 box, 6 vols. 1 linear feet
Call no.: FS 140

A particle physicist educated at Johns Hopkins (PhD, 1965), Stanley S. Hertzbach joined the Physics faculty at UMass Amherst in 1965. Over the course of his career, he took part in high-energy experimental work at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the CERN hadron collider, the Cornell electron synchrotron, and beginning in 1979, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). With his colleague Richard Koffler, Hertzbach joined the SLD collaboration at SLAC in 1986 studying Z particles, and the BaBar (B Meson) group in 1994. A major contributor to the SLD “beamline group,” Hertzbach took part in the BaBar calorimeter beam test and in testing of its calorimeter modules. He was an active member of the SLD advisory group and chaired the SLAC Users Organization (SLUO) in the 1990s. Hertzbach’s contributions to UMass included service on several committees relating to student achievement, including a stint as Undergraduate Advising Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Hertzbach retired from UMass in 2009.

The Hertzbach collection consists of two distinct parts: six laboratory notebooks kept while conducting research at SLAC (1987-2002), and approximately 0.5 linear feet of records from university committees on which Hertzbach sat (e.g. the Space and Calendar, 1977-1983).

Subjects

B mesonsNuclear physicsSLAC National Accelerator LaboratoryUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics

Types of material

Laboratory notes
Hoag, Benjamin

Benjamin Hoag Records

1901-1915 Bulk: 1907-1914
3 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 710

Born at Ancram, N.Y., the merchant Benjamin Hoag (1865-1932) lived most of his life in Stephentown, N.Y., near the Massachusetts border. In 1900, he was listed as a dealer in bicycles, but by 1910, he was operating a broader retail trade in dry goods and grains. At the same time, he conducted a thriving trade in ornithological and oological supplies, announcing in journals such as The Oologist that he sold “books, periodicals, tools, supplies, eggs” as well as “fine line fish tackle and rods.” He also appears to have run a magazine subscription agency, offering everything from the Saturday Evening Post and Good Housekeeping to professional journals such as the Condor Magazine.

The Hoag collection consists of 1,345 letters, mostly incoming, and over 800 receipts, ephemeral items, and other documents, relating to Hoag’s oological and magazine businesses. Concentrated between 1901 and 1914, the collection offers a rich documentation of the oological trade in the years shortly before it was outlawed in 1918. The collection is organized chronologically.

Subjects

Birds--EggsEgg trade--New York (State)

Contributors

Hoag, Benjamin